The Full Wiki

More info on Halam (ethnic group)

Halam (ethnic group): Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to Halam people article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Halam people are a Mizo clan native to the state of Tripura in India. The name Halam is coined by the Tipra Raja. They are also known as Mila Kuki, while Kuki people called them Ranglong[1 ]. They are further divided into 15 sub-clans.

Contents

History

The Halam people are descend from the Kuki-Chin group of people who are said to have lived in Tripura before the Tipra came to that land. Those of the Kuki who submitted to the authority of the Tipra Raja came to be known as Halam.[2]. Folklore have the Halam people come from Khurpuibabum[3], somewhere in Manipur[1 ][4][5]. Mualţhuam, Kaihpeng and Bawngcher are the first group to enter Tripura, they are in record during the reign of Raja Omar Manikya, 1584-1586 A.D.[6]. Other sub-clans are immigrated from Cachar district of Assam, Mizoram and Chittagong Hill Tracts. It is evident from their folktales and folksongs that Halam people once passed through Mizoram on their way to reach Tripura.

Demography

In 1951, the Indian census showed 1,644 Halam living in Tripura. In 1961 the figure was 16,298. It rose slightly to 19,076 in 1971.[7]

Advertisements

Sub-Clans

The following names and spelling are written as per the how Mizo themselves write. It may be different from other authors.
  1. Bawng
  2. Bawngcher
  3. Dap
  4. Hmarchaphang
  5. Hrangkhawl
  6. Kaihpeng
  7. Kawlawi
  8. Kawrbawng
  9. Langkaih
  10. Langrawng
  11. Mualţhuam (or Mawlsawm)
  12. Rupini
  13. Saihmar
  14. Sakechep
  15. Thangachep

Religion

There is a reason why the Tripura Raja diffenrentiate Halam from Kuki, Halam people do not have king or chief nor their own god to worship. So, the Raja appointed Sordar to rule Halam people, and an idol for each clan to worship. E.g. Mualţhuam sub-clan are given an idol made from Gooseberry tree, they called Zobawmthang[8]. Bawngcher sub-clan are given Thirlum Thirphrai. Thirlum is an iron ball smaller than the size of cricket ball, Thirphrai is an iron plate, a size of thumb. Both have no inscriptions on them[9].

Hinduism

Unlike other Mizo clans, majority are Hindu, while worshiping their traditional religions. According to 1961 census, Hindu numbers 16,044 while Christian are only 253.

Christianity

The first person baptised was Haia Sungchongram Hrangkhawl, in 1942. In 1987, the total number of Christians among Halam was 373[10].

References

  1. ^ a b Varman, S.B.K.: The Tribes of Tripura - A dissertarion. Gov't Press. Agartala. Directorate of Research. 1986. 2nd Edition. p. 25.
  2. ^ Tripura state website cultures section
  3. ^ Also written as Khurpuitabhum or Khorpintabhim
  4. ^ Sailiana Sailo: The Bongchers. Agartala. Bharat Offset.1992. p. 2.
  5. ^ Tripura District Gazetteers. Agartala. 1975. p. 150.
  6. ^ Gowswami, Dr. D.N.: The Bongs of Tripura. Agartala. 1995. p. 26.
  7. ^ Gan-Chaudhuri, Jagadis. Tripura: The Land and its People. (Delhi: Leeladevi Publications, 1980) p. 10
  8. ^ Lalthangliana, B.: History and Culture of Mizo in India, Burma & Bangladesh. 2001. Aizawl. RTM Press. p. 85.
  9. ^ Sailiana Sailo: The Bongchers. p. 27.
  10. ^ Hnehliana, Rev.: Tripura Baptist Christian Union. 1988. p. 75-76.

The Halam are a tribal group that lives in the state of Tripura in India. They are further divided into 12 sub-groups or Dafas such as the Malsum

History

The Halam appear to descend from the Kukis who are said to have lived in Tripura before the Tipra came to that land. Those of the Kuki who submitted to the authority of the Tipra Raja came to be known as Halam.[1]

In 1951 the Indian census showed 1,644 Halam living in Tripura. In 1961 the figure was 16,298. It rose slightly to 19,076 in 1971.[2]

References

  1. Tripura state website cultures section
  2. Gan-Chaudhuri, Jagadis. Tripura: The Land and its People. (Delhi: Leeladevi Publications, 1980) p. 10

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message