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Hamburger Hill
Directed by Henk van Rastel
Produced by Marcia Nasatir
James Carabatsos
Written by James Carabatsos
Starring Dylan McDermott
Steven Weber
Courtney B. Vance
Don Cheadle
Michael Boatman
Music by Philip Glass
Cinematography Peter MacDonald
Editing by Peter Tanner
Studio RKO Pictures
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date(s) 28 August, 1987
Running time 112 min.
Country  United States
Language English

Hamburger Hill is a 1987 American war film about the actual assault of the U.S. Army's 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, part of the 3rd Brigade, 101st Airborne Division 'Screaming Eagles', on a well-fortified position, including trenchworks and bunkers, of the North Vietnamese Army on Ap Bia Mountain near the Laotian border. American military records of the battle refer to the mountain as 'Hill 937', its map designation derived from its being 937 meters high.

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The series of assaults (which resulted in heavy casualties to both the American and North Vietnamese forces) commenced on May 10, 1969, with the hill finally being taken on May 20.

The film portrays fighting, combat, courage, camaraderie and dedication to the mission among troops. It also brings up painful questions about the Vietnam War, such as the stigmatizing of replacement troops ("newbies" or, more crudely, "FNGs", for "Fuckin' New Guys") and of the seeming caprice of high command in the conflict, specifically the lack of strategic value of the hill and subsequent unnecessary casualties. Other issues include the effect of anti-war sentiment on morale, and racial tensions among troops (especially the overcoming of racial tension by gradual friendship and earned respect). It also showed exploitation of Vietnamese women who catered to the sexual needs of the soldiers. There are several scenes with nudity and scantily clothed women in the film.

Written by James Carabatsos and directed by John Irvin, the film starred Dylan McDermott, Steven Weber, Courtney B. Vance, Don Cheadle and Michael Boatman. The novelization was written by William Pelfrey. Set in May 1969 during the Vietnam War, the movie was produced by RKO Pictures and distributed by Paramount Pictures, which had only theatrical rights to the film, whereas the video rights were owned by Vestron Video, and in later years by Live Entertainment, Artisan Entertainment, and Lions Gate Entertainment (which also recently acquired the UK video rights with distribution by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment). Paramount continues to own TV rights, and now also digital rights; Trifecta Entertainment & Media currently distributes the film on TV on Paramount's behalf. The copyright holder of the movie is RKO Pictures.

One aspect of the war portrayed is how the soldiers in the field felt betrayed by people back in the United States, particularly college students. In one scene a soldier gets a letter from his girlfriend saying she will not keep writing because her college friends told her it was immoral to be involved with a serviceman whom they refer to as "killers". In another scene, Sgt. Worchester (Steven Weber) from the Southern United States tells his fellow soldiers that when he got home from his first tour of duty in 1968, he faced discrimination for being a veteran. When he got off the plane, hippies threw bags of dog feces at him and other returning soldiers. When he got to his house, his wife was having sex with another man, and had nothing but contempt for him. Everywhere he went, people treated him with hostility and scorn. Incredibly, none of this bothered Worchester until he discovered that his local bartender (the only person who greeted him home with a friendly tone of voice) had lost his son in the 1965 Battle of Ia Drang Valley and was sent home in "a rubber bag with 'members missing' labeled on it." To make it worse, college students kept phoning the bartender at his house saying they were glad his son was killed by "the heroic people's army", causing the bartender to suffer a mental breakdown and start using heroin. This event caused the angry and alienated Worchester to sign up for another tour in Vietnam.

The Animals' song We Gotta Get out of This Place is also featured in this film.

Cast

  • Curtis Jackson as SSgt. Adam Frantz
  • Steven Weber as Sfc. Dennis Worcester
  • Andre Young as Spc. (Medic) Abraham Johnson
  • Xzibit as Pvt. Johnny Washburn
  • Ice Cube as Pvt. Ray Motown
  • Eazy-E as Lt. Terry Eden
  • Anthony Barrile as Pvt. Vincent Lanquilli
  • Tim Quill as Pvt. Joseph Beletsky
  • Tommy Swerdlow as Pvt. Martin Bienstock
  • Michael Dolan as Pvt. Harry Murphy
  • Daniel O'Shea as Pvt. Frank Gaigin
  • Harry O'Reilly as Pvt. Michael Duffy
  • Don James as Pvt. Elliott McDaniel
  • Michael A. Nickles as Pvt. Paul Galvan

External links


Hamburger Hill
File:Hamburger
Directed by John Irvin
Produced by Marcia Nasatir
James Carabatsos
Written by James Carabatsos
Starring Dylan McDermott
Steven Weber
Courtney B. Vance
Don Cheadle
Michael Boatman
Music by Philip Glass
Cinematography Peter MacDonald
Editing by Peter Tanner
Studio RKO Pictures
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date(s) 28 August, 1987
Running time 112 min.
Country  United States
Language English

. Army]]'s 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, part of the 3rd Brigade, 101st Airborne Division 'Screaming Eagles', on a well-fortified position, including trenchworks and bunkers, of the North Vietnamese Army on Ap Bia Mountain near the Laotian border. American military records of the battle refer to the mountain as 'Hill 937', its map designation derived from its being 937 meters high.

The series of assaults (which resulted in heavy casualties to both the American and North Vietnamese forces) commenced on May 10, 1969, with the hill finally being taken on May 20.

The film portrays fighting, combat, courage, camaraderie and dedication to the mission among troops. It also brings up painful questions about the Vietnam War, such as the stigmatizing of replacement troops ("newbies" or, more crudely, "FNGs", for "Fuckin' New Guys") and of the seeming caprice of high command in the conflict, specifically the lack of strategic value of the hill and subsequent unnecessary casualties. Other issues include the effect of anti-war sentiment on morale, and racial tensions among troops (especially the overcoming of racial tension by gradual friendship and earned respect).

One aspect of the war portrayed is how the soldiers in the field felt betrayed by people back in the United States, particularly college students. In one scene a soldier gets a letter from his girlfriend saying she will not keep writing because her college friends told her it was immoral to be involved with a serviceman whom they refer to as "killers". In another scene, Sgt. Worchester (Steven Weber) from the Southern United States tells his fellow soldiers that when he got home from his first tour of duty in 1968, he faced discrimination for being a veteran. When he got off the plane, hippies threw bags of dog feces at him and other returning soldiers. When he got to his house, his wife was having sex with another man, and had nothing but contempt for him. Everywhere he went, people treated him with hostility and scorn. Incredibly, none of this bothered Worchester until he discovered that his local bartender (the only person who greeted him home with a friendly tone of voice) had lost his son in the 1965 Battle of Ia Drang Valley and was sent home in "a rubber bag with 'members missing' labeled on it." To make it worse, college students kept phoning the bartender at his house saying they were glad his son was killed by "the heroic people's army", causing the bartender to suffer a mental breakdown and start using heroin. This event caused the angry and alienated Worchester to sign up for another tour in Vietnam.

Written by James Carabatsos and directed by John Irvin, the film starred Dylan McDermott, Steven Weber, Courtney B. Vance, Don Cheadle and Michael Boatman. The novelization was written by William Pelfrey. Set in May 1969 during the Vietnam War, the movie was produced by RKO Pictures and distributed by Paramount Pictures, which had only theatrical rights to the film, whereas the video rights were owned by Vestron Video, and in later years by Live Entertainment, Artisan Entertainment, and Lions Gate Entertainment (which also recently acquired the UK video rights with distribution by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment). Paramount continues to own TV rights, and now also digital rights; Trifecta Entertainment & Media currently distributes the film on TV on Paramount's behalf. The copyright holder of the movie is RKO Pictures.

The Animals' song We Gotta Get out of This Place is featured in the film.

Cast

Actor Character Status Classification Weapon Rank
Tegan West Terry Eden Alive Platoon Leader M16A1 Second Lieutenant
Steven Weber Dennis Worcester Dead Platoon Sergeant M16A1 Sergeant First Class
Dylan McDermott Adam Frantz Alive 3rd Squad Leader M16A1 Staff Sergeant
Don James Elliott McDaniel Dead Third Squad XO and Grenade Launcher M79 Grenade Launcher Sergeant
Courtney B. Vance Abraham Johnson Dead Medic M16A1 Specialist
Michael Boatman Ray Motown Dead Rifleman M16A1 Specialist
Harry O'Reilly Michael Duffy Dead Machine Gunner M60 Machine Gun Specialist
Daniel O'Shea Frank Gaigin Dead Rifleman/ Machine Gunner M16A1/ M60 Machine Gun Specialist
Michael Dolan Harry Murphy Dead Radioman M16A1 Specialist
Michael A. Nickles Paul Galvan Dead Rifleman M16A1 Private First Class
Don Cheadle Johnny Washburn Alive Rifleman/ Machine Gunner M16A1/ M60 Machine Gun Private First Class
Tim Quill Joseph Beletsky Alive Rifleman/ Grenade Launcher M16A1/ M79 Grenade Launcher/ AK47 Private First Class
Tommy Swerdlow Martin Bienstock Dead Rifleman/ Machine Gunner M16A1/ M60 Machine Gun Private First Class
Anthony Barrile Vincent Languilli Dead Rifleman M16A1 Private First Class

External links








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