Haplogroup R (Y-DNA): Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Advertisements

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Haplogroup R

Haplogroup R (Y-DNA).jpg

Time of origin 26,800 years BP[1]
Place of origin Central Asia or South Asia or the Middle east
Ancestor P
Descendants R1, R1a, R1b, R2
Defining mutations R = M207
:R1 = M173
::R1a = L62, L63
::R1b = M342
:R2 = M124 [2]

In human genetics, Haplogroup R is a Y-chromosome DNA haplogroup, a subgroup of haplogroup P, defined by the M207 mutation.

Contents

Origins

This haplogroup is believed to have arisen around 26,800 years ago,[3] somewhere in Central Asia or South Asia, where its ancestor Haplogroup P is most often found at polymorphic frequencies.[4] Cambridge University geneticist Kivisild et al. (2003) suggests that southern and western Asia might be the source of this haplogroup:

Given the geographic spread and STR diversities of sister clades R1 and R2, the latter of which is restricted to India, Pakistan, Iran, and southern central Asia, it is possible that southern and western Asia were the source for R1 and R1a differentiation.
R
R1

R1a



R1b




R2



Distribution

Distribution of R1a (purple) and R1b (red)

The R haplogroup is common throughout Europe and western Asia and the Indian sub-continent, and in those whose ancestry is from within these regions. It also occurs in North and Sub-Saharan Africa. The distribution is markedly different for the two major subclades R1a and R1b.

Haplogroup R1a is typical in populations of Eastern Europe and parts of Central Europe, especially in Slavic speakers. R1a has a significant presence in Northern Europe, South and Central Asia (including Iran), Siberia, as well as India. R1a can be found in low frequencies in the Middle East, mostly in Indo-European speakers or their descendants. [5]

Haplogroup R1b predominates in Western Europe. R1b can be found at high frequency in Bashkortostan (Russia)[6]. R1b can be found at low frequency in Central Asia and in the Middle East, as well as North Africa. There is an isolated pocket of R1b in Sub Saharan Africa.[7] In Europe, R1b is indicative of Celtic influence.

Subclades

The subclades of haplogroup R with their defining mutation, according to the stratification chart published by the 2006 International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG)[8]:

  • R*
  • R1 (M173)
    • R1a (SRY10831.2 (SRY1532)) is typical in parts of Eastern Europe, Central Europe, South Asia and Central Asia. R1a also has a significant presence in the rest of Europe, Siberia, and the Middle East
      • R1a1 (M17, M198)
        • R1a1a (M56)
        • R1a1b (M157)
        • R1a1c (M64.2, M87, M204)
        • R1a1*
      • R1a*
    • R1b (M343) Typical of populations of Western Europe and Bashkortostan, with a moderate distribution throughout Eurasia and in parts of Africa
      • R1b1 (P25)
        • R1b1a (M18)
        • R1b1b (M73)
        • R1b1c (M269, S3, S10, S13, S17)
          • R1b1c1 (M37)
          • R1b1c2 (M65)
          • R1b1c3 (M126)
          • R1b1c4 (M153)
          • R1b1c5 (M160)
          • R1b1c6 (SRY2627, M167)
          • R1b1c7 (M222)
          • R1b1c8 (P66)
          • R1b1c9 (S21)
            • R1b1c9a (S26)
            • R1b1c9b (S29)
            • R1b1c9*
          • R1b1c10 (S28)
          • R1b1c*
        • R1b1d (M335)
        • R1b1*
      • R1b*
    • R1*
  • R2 (M124) Typical of populations of South Asia, with a moderate distribution in Central Asia and the Caucasus

Haplogroup R*

Y-chromosomes which possess the marker M207 (which defines Haplogroup R), but neither of the markers for its subgroups, are categorised as belonging to group R*. However, R* is exceedingly rare. It has been found in 10.3% (10/97) of a sample of Burusho, 6.8% (3/44) of a sample of Kalash, and 1.0% (1/96) of a sample of Pashtuns from northern Pakistan in addition to 0.63% (4/638) of an ethnically mixed Pakistani sample.[9]

R1

The majority of members of haplogroup R belong to its subgroup R1, defined by marker M173. R1 is very common throughout Europe and western Eurasia in the form of its subclades R1a (SRY1532) and R1b (M343).[10][11]

R1*

The Haplogroup R1* is very rare. Examples have been found in Turkey, Pakistan and India, but the highest frequency so far discovered is in Iran.[12]

R1a

The highest levels of R1a (>50%) are found across the Eurasian Steppe: West Bengal Brahmins (72%), and Uttar Pradesh Brahmins, (67%) , the Ishkashimi (68%), the Tajik population of Khojant (64%), Kyrgyz (63.5%), Sorbs (63.39%), Poles (56.4%), Ukrainians (50%) and Russians (50%)[4][10][13][14] and in the Central India among the saharia tribe of Madhya Pradesh R1a*(22.8%) and R1a1(28.07%).[15]

R1a has been variously associated with:

The Modern studies for R1a1 (M17) suggest that it could have originated in South Asia. It could have found its way initially from Western India (Gujrat) through Pakistan and Kashmir, then via Central Asia and Russia, before finally coming to Europe"..."as part of an archaeologically dated Paleolithic movement from east to west 30,000 years ago[17].

R1b

Haplogroup R1b is thought to have originated in Central Asia, the Middle East, or Iberia.[citation needed] It is prolific in Western Europe, where frequencies of 70% or more have been found in populations from Ireland,[11] Spain,[10] and the Netherlands,[10] according to the Genographic Project conducted by the National Geographic Society.[18]

It is also found in Bashkortostan where its frequency surpasses 84% in some parts of Bashkortostan[6].

It is also present at lower frequencies throughout Eastern Europe.[19]

Although it is rare in South Asia. Some populations showing relatively high percentages for R1b. These include Lambadi(Andhra Pradesh) showing 37%[20] , Hazara 32%[21] and Agharia(East India) at 30%[21]. Besides these, R1b appeared in Balochi(8%), Chenchu(2%), Makrani(5%), Pallan(3.5%), Pathan(9.5%), Punjabi(7.5%) and West Bengalis(6.5%)[20][21].

It is also found in North Africa where its frequency surpasses 10% in some parts of Algeria.[22]

R2

The haplogroup R2 is defined by the presence of the marker M124. At least 90% of R2 individuals are located in the Indian sub-continent.[23] It is also reported in Caucasian and Central Asian populations.

R2 may have arisen in southern Central Asia, and its members migrated southward as part of the second major wave of human migration into India.[24]

Notes

  1. ^ Tatiana M. Karafet, Fernando L. Mendez, Monica B. Meilerman, Peter A. Underhill, Stephen L. Zegura, and Michael F. Hammer, New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree,Genome Research, (April 2, 2008).
  2. ^ Y-DNA Haplogroup R and its Subclades - 2008 from ISOGG
  3. ^ Tatiana M. Karafet, Fernando L. Mendez, Monica B. Meilerman, Peter A. Underhill, Stephen L. Zegura, and Michael F. Hammer, New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree Genome Research, (April 2, 2008).
  4. ^ a b c R.Spencer Wells et al, The Eurasian Heartland: A continental perspective on Y-chromosome diversity, PNAS August 28, 2001, vol. 98 no. 18, pp.10244-10249.
  5. ^ http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~mcdonald/WorldHaplogroupsMaps.pdf
  6. ^ a b A. S. Lobov et al. (2009), "Y chromosome analysis in subpopulations of Bashkirs from Russia" (original text in Russian)
  7. ^ http://www.eupedia.com/europe/origins_haplogroups_europe.shtml
  8. ^ http://www.isogg.org/tree/Main06.html ISOGG Website
  9. ^ Sadaf Firasat, Shagufta Khaliq, Aisha Mohyuddin, Myrto Papaioannou, Chris Tyler-Smith, Peter A Underhill and Qasim Ayub, "Y-chromosomal evidence for a limited Greek contribution to the Pathan population of Pakistan," European Journal of Human Genetics (2007) 15, 121–126.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Semino et al. 2000
  11. ^ a b Rosser et al. 2000
  12. ^ M. Regueiro et al., Iran: Tricontinental Nexus for Y-Chromosome Driven Migration, Human Heredity vol. 61 (2006), pp. 132–143.
  13. ^ High-Resolution Phylogenetic Analysis of Southeastern Europe Traces Major Episodes of Paternal Gene Flow Among Slavic Populations - Pericic et al. 22 (10): 1964 - Molecular Bi...
  14. ^ Behar et al. (2003)
  15. ^ The Autochthonous Origin and a Tribal Link of Indian Brahmins: Evaluation Through Molecular Genetic Markers, by S. Sharma (1,2), E. Rai (1,2), S. Singh (1,2), P.R. Sharma (1,3), A.K. Bhat (1), K. Darvishi (1), A.J.S. Bhanwer (2), P.K. Tiwari (3), R.N.K. Bamezai (1) 1) NCAHG, SLS, JNU, New delhi; 2) Department of Human Genetics, GNDU, Amritsar; 3) Centre for Genomics, SOS zoology, JU, Gwalior, Page 273 (1344/T), Published in The American Society of Human Genetics 57th Annual Meeting, October 23–27, 2007, San Diego, California.
  16. ^ Passarino et al. (2002)
  17. ^ Underhill et al. (2009)
  18. ^ "Haplogroup R1 (M173)". The Genographic Project. National Geographic Society. https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/atlas.html?card=my047. Retrieved 2008-03-11. 
  19. ^ B. Arredi, E. S. Poloni and C. Tyler-Smith, The peopling of Europe, in M. Crawford (ed.), Anthropological Genetics: Theory, methods and applications (2007), p. 394.
  20. ^ a b Kivisild et al. (2005)
  21. ^ a b c Sengupta et al. (2005)
  22. ^ Analysis of Y-chromosomal SNP haplogroups and STR haplotypes in an Algerian population sample
  23. ^ Manoukian (2006)
  24. ^ "The Genographic Project". National Geographic Society. https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/index.html. Retrieved 2008-03-13. . The first wave consisted of African migrants who traveled along the Indian coastline some 50,000 to 60,000 years ago.

See also

Human Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) haplogroups (by ethnic groups · famous haplotypes)

most recent common Y-ancestor
|
A BT
|
B CT
|
CF DE
| |
C F D E
|
G H IJK
|
IJ K
| |
I J L MNOPS T
|
M NO P S
| |
N O Q R

References

External links

Phylogenetic tree of Y-DNA haplogroup R

Other information of Y-DNA haplogroup R


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

In human genetics, Haplogroup R is a Y-chromosome DNA haplogroup, a subgroup of haplogroup P, associated with the M207 mutation. It is believed to have occurred somewhere in Northwest Asia between 30,000 and 35,000 years ago. However, most of the rare forms of Haplogroup R chromosomes, as well as most cases of the closely related Haplogroup Q, are found among populations of Central Asia, South Asia, Australia, Siberia, Native Americans, and Cameroon.

Haplogroup R
Haplogroup R1
Haplogroup R1a

Haplogroup R1a1




Haplogroup R1b




Haplogroup R2



The majority of members of haplogroup R belong to the Haplogroup R1, defined by marker M173. R1 is very common throughout Europe and western Eurasia. Its distribution is believed to be associated with the re-settlement of Eurasia following the last glacial maximum. Its main subgroups are R1a (SRY1532) and R1b (M343).

One isolated clade (or clades) of Y chromosomes that appear to belong to Haplogroup R1* (M173-derived) is found at high frequency among the native populations of northern Cameroon in west-central Africa, which is believed to reflect a prehistoric back-migration of an ancient proto-Eurasian population into Africa; some researchers have reported having also detected Haplogroup K2 Y-chromosomes at a low frequency among some of these Cameroonian populations, which also suggests a Eurasian affinity.[1] Some Y-chromosomes that appear to be closely related to the northern Cameroonian R1b1* are found at a substantial frequency among the modern population of Egypt. Many modern populations of northern Cameroon speak Chadic languages, which are classified as an ancient branch of the Afro-Asiatic superfamily of languages; the now extinct language of the Ancient Egyptians also belonged to the same superfamily.

Individuals whose Y-chromosomes possess all the mutations on internal nodes of the Y-DNA tree down to and including M207 (which defines Haplogroup R) but which display neither the M173 mutation that defines Haplogroup R1 nor the M124 mutation that defines Haplogroup R2 are categorised as belonging to group R*. Some instances of Haplogroup R* have been reported from samples of Australian aboriginal populations.

Contents

Subclades

The subclades of haplogroup R with their defining mutation, according to the 2006 ISOGG tree:

  • R*
  • R1 (M173)
    • R1a (SRY1532)
      • R1a1 (M17, M198)
        • R1a1a (M56)
        • R1a1b (M157)
        • R1a1c (M64.2, M87, M204)
        • R1a1*
      • R1a*
    • R1b (M343)
      • R1b1 (P25)
        • R1b1a (M18)
        • R1b1b (M73)
        • R1b1c (M269, S3, S10, S13, S17)
          • R1b1c1 (M37)
          • R1b1c2 (M65)
          • R1b1c3 (M126)
          • R1b1c4 (M153)
          • R1b1c5 (M160)
          • R1b1c6 (SRY2627, M167)
          • R1b1c7 (M222)
          • R1b1c8 (P66)
          • R1b1c9 (S21)
            • R1b1c9a (S26)
            • R1b1c9b (S29)
            • R1b1c9*
          • R1b1c10 (S28)
          • R1b1c*
        • R1b1d (M335)
        • R1b1*
      • R1b*
    • R1*
  • R2 (M124)

R1

Distribution of R1a (purple) and R1b (red)

R1a1

Main article: Haplogroup R1a1 (Y-DNA)

R1a likely originated in the Eurasian Steppes, and may be associated with the Kurgan culture and Proto-Indo-European expansion. It is primarily found in Central and Western Asia, India, and the Slavic peoples of Eastern Europe, as well as among some populations of Mongolia and southern Siberia, where it might reflect Scythian influences of classical antiquity. Some researchers have objected to the association of Haplogroup R1a with Proto-Indo-Europeans, and believe instead that it reflects the traces of the ancient Scythian and Sarmatian domains, which they associate with the Indo-Iranian, Slavic, Satem Indo-European (Proto-Balto-Slavic-Indo-Iranian), Ugric, or even Turkic languages. One important observation that has been made about the frequently occurring subgroup R1a1 is that it appears to be very recently introduced in both the western and eastern extremes of its distribution: all the Haplogroup R1a1 Y-chromosomes found among the Czechs of Central Europe and the Khoton people of Mongolia coalesce to a common patrilineal ancestor who should have lived well within the bounds of the Neolithic, and possibly even within the bounds of historical time. This distribution is somewhat reminiscent of the widespread and frequently occurring subgroup of Haplogroup C3 that is believed to represent direct patrilineal descent from Genghis Khan. The R1a1 component of the Y-chromosome diversity among the Czechs suggests a rapid demographic expansion beginning about 60 to 80 generations ago, which would equate to about 1500 years ago (approx. 500 AD) to 2000 years ago (approx. 1 AD) with a generation time of 25 years. This means that the Y-chromosome distribution in the modern Czech population may be nothing but a magnified and perhaps somewhat modified version of the Y-chromosome distribution as it was in the region where the ancestors of the Czechs dwelt during the times of the Roman Empire.

Haplogroup R1a1 (M17) is spread across Eurasia. It is common in Europe, northern Central Asia, and South Asia. The first carriers of the R1a1 haplotype are believed to be have been peoples living about 10,000 years ago around Ukrainian LGM refuge area who after become nomadic proliferated on Eurasian steppes. Current theories point to them being speakers of the Proto-Indo-European language in the Kurgan scenario. In Europe, the highest frequencies are found among Eastern Europeans. Today it is found with its highest levels and diversity in Ukraine [1], where more than one out of two men has this haplogroup. It is found in high frequencies as well in Russia, Poland, and the Czech Republic, to name only a few, and relatively high frequencies are also found in Northern Europe and is believed to have been spread across Europe by the Vikings, which may account for the existence of it in, among other places, the British Isles.[2]

R1b

Haplogroup R1b originated prior to or during the last glaciation, when it was concentrated in refugia in southern Europe and the Aegean. It is the most common haplogroup in Western Europe, but has been found at low frequency as far away as Iran and Korea. It is also found in North Africa where its frequency surpasses 10% in some parts of Algeria[2]. In south-eastern England the frequency of R1b is about 70%; in parts of the rest of north and western England, Spain, Portugal, Wales and Ireland, it is as high as 90%; and in parts of north-western Ireland it reaches 98%. The R1b clade appears to have a much higher degree of internal diversity than R1a, which suggests that the M343 mutation that derives R1b from R1* may have occurred considerably earlier than the SRY1532 mutation that defines R1a.

R1b (previously called Hg1 and Eu18) is the most frequent Y-chromosome haplogroup in Europe. It is an offshoot of R1 (M173), characterised by the M343 marker.[3] An overwhelming majority of members of R1b are classified as R1b1 (defined by the P25 marker), the remainder as R1b*. Its frequency is highest in Western Europe (and due to modern European emigration, in parts of the Americas). The majority of R1b-carriers of European descent belong to the subclade R1b1c (M269).

R2

Main article: Haplogroup R2 (Y-DNA)

Haplogroup R2 (M124), found only in populations of South Asia, Central Asia, Iran, and the Caucasus. Haplogroup R2 is also found at a high frequency among certain groups of Roma (i.e., Gypsies), who are generally believed to have migrated into Europe and other regions from an ancient homeland in India.

The R2 subgroup is defined by marker M124. Unlike the other subgroups of R, R2 is confined to South Asia and nearby regions. The highest frequency is found in South Asia. It is also reported in lower frequencies in Caucasian and Central Asian populations.

Notes

  1. ^ Mulcare, Charlotte A. et al (2004). "[http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/journal/issues/v74n6/40808/40808.web.pdf The T Allele of a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism 13.9 kb Upstream of the Lactase Gene (LCT) (C513.9kbT) Does Not Predict or Cause the Lactase-Persistence Phenotype in Africans]". The American Journal of Human Genetics. 74: 1107. 
  2. ^ Analysis of Y-chromosomal SNP haplogroups and STR haplotypes in an Algerian population sample
  3. ^ Note that in earlier literature the M269 marker, rather than M343, was used to define the R1b haplogroup. Then, for a time (from 2003 to 2005) what is now R1b1c was designated R1b3.

References

See also

Human Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) haplogroups

Y-most recent common ancestor
|
A BR
B CR
C DE F
D E G H IJ K
I J L M NO P
N O Q R

External links

R1


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Haplogroup R (Y-DNA). The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Haplogroup R (Y-DNA)RDF feed

This article uses material from the "Haplogroup R (Y-DNA)" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message