Hardin County, Kentucky: Wikis

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Hardin County, Kentucky
Map of Kentucky highlighting Hardin County
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of the U.S. highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Seat Elizabethtown
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

630 sq mi (1,632 km²)
628 sq mi (1,627 km²)
2 sq mi (5 km²), 0.30%
PopulationEst.
 - (2007)
 - Density

97,949
150/sq mi (58/km²)
Founded 1793
Named for Colonel John Hardin (1753–1792), American Revolutionary War soldier serving with George Rogers Clark, killed in Northwest Indian War.
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Hardin County Kentucky courthouse.jpg
Hardin County courthouse in Elizabethtown, Kentucky
Website www.hcky.org

Hardin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1793. As of 2008, the population was 98,546. Its county seat is at Elizabethtown[1]. Hardin County is part of the Elizabethtown, Kentucky, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The county is named for John Hardin, a Continental Army officer during the American Revolution. President Abraham Lincoln was born in what was then Hardin County near Hodgenville, now part of modern-day LaRue County.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 630 square miles (1,632 km2), of which 628 square miles (1,627 km2) is land and 2 square miles (5.2 km2) is water.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1800 3,653
1810 7,531 106.2%
1820 10,498 39.4%
1830 12,849 22.4%
1840 16,357 27.3%
1850 14,525 −11.2%
1860 15,189 4.6%
1870 15,705 3.4%
1880 22,564 43.7%
1890 21,304 −5.6%
1900 22,937 7.7%
1910 22,696 −1.1%
1920 24,287 7.0%
1930 20,913 −13.9%
1940 29,108 39.2%
1950 50,312 72.8%
1960 67,789 34.7%
1970 78,421 15.7%
1980 88,917 13.4%
1990 89,240 0.4%
2000 94,174 5.5%
Est. 2008 98,546 4.6%
http://ukcc.uky.edu/~census/21093.txt

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 94,174 people, 34,497 households, and 25,355 families residing in the county. The population density was 150 per square mile (58 /km2). There were 37,673 housing units at an average density of 60 per square mile (23 /km2). The racial makeup of the county was 81.99% White, 11.87% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 1.80% Asian, 0.22% Pacific Islander, 1.35% from other races, and 2.35% from two or more races. 3.35% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race.

There were 34,497 households out of which 38.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.80% were married couples living together, 11.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.50% were non-families. 22.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.07. The largest metropolitan area in the county is the City of Elizabethtown.

The age distribution was 27.60% under the age of 18, 10.60% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 9.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 102.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,744, and the median income for a family was $43,610. Males had a median income of $30,743 versus $22,688 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,487. About 8.20% of families and 10.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.50% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

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Incorporated places

Census-designated places

Note: Census-designated places are unincorporated.

  • Fort Knox - a military base (partly in Meade County)

Unincorporated places

  • Harcourt
  • Howell Spring
  • Hardin Springs
  • Howevalley
  • Mill Creek
  • New Fruit
  • Nolin
  • Quaker Valley
  • Red Mills
  • Rineyville
  • St. John
  • Star Mills
  • Stephensburg
  • Summitt
  • Tip Top
  • Tunnel Hill
  • Vertrees
  • White Mills
  • Youngers Creek

Economy

The economy of Hardin County is largely dominated by the adjacent Fort Knox Military Installation.

The U.S. Gold Bullion Depository at Fort Knox.

The Army Human Resource Center, the largest construction project in the history of Fort Knox, began in November 2007. It’s a $185 million, three-story, 880,000-square-foot (82,000 m2) complex, sitting on 104 acres (0.42 km2). As many as 2,100 new permanent human resources, information technology, and administrative white-collar civilian professionals will be working there.

Officials expect that as many as 12,000 people, including the families of soldiers and civilian workers to relocate to the area as a result of the Fort Knox realignment.

Approximately $1 billion in federal and state construction funds are scheduled for Fort Knox, and in the surrounding areas by the end of 2011.

Gov. Steve Beshear of Kentucky announced the creation of a task force to help Hardin County, and the surrounding counties prepare for the Fort Knox realignment. The group is “designed to meet specific needs” in areas such as transportation, economic development, education, water and sewer availability, and area wide planning.

A $600 million lithium-ion battery manufacturing complex is being planned for Glendale, Ky.

Hardin County is a limited dry county, meaning that sale of alcohol in the county is prohibited except in very limited areas.

Education

K-12

Three public school districts operate in the county:

  • The Hardin County Schools serve K-12 students in most of the county, with the exception of (most of) Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, and for K-8 students only, the West Point area. The district operates seven elementary schools, five middle schools, and three high schools.
  • The Elizabethtown Independent Schools serve students in most of the city of Elizabethtown; however, some areas are instead served by the Hardin County district. The district operates three elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school.
  • West Point School is a K-8 school serving the West Point area, which is cut off from the rest of Hardin County by Fort Knox.

Four private schools also operate in the county, St. James Catholic School, Elizabethtown Christian Academy, North Hardin Christian School, and Hardin Christian Academy.

The Department of Defense Education Activity, through its Domestic Dependent Elementary and Secondary Schools subagency, operates eight schools on the Fort Knox base for military dependents. DDESS has four elementary schools (grades K-3), two intermediate schools (4-6), one middle school (7-8), and one high school (9-12) on base.

A new $16-million Fort Knox High School, a two-story, state-of-the-art facility that united the existing vocational school with the current gymnasium, creating a connected campus was completed in 2008, with dedication on August 7, 2008. Most of the remaining parts of the old high school have already been demolished. [3]

Postsecondary education

Elizabethtown is home to Elizabethtown Community and Technical College, a member of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System.

See also

Coordinates: 37°42′N 85°58′W / 37.70°N 85.96°W / 37.70; -85.96

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ The new Fort Knox High School

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

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Hardin County, Kentucky
Map
File:Map of Kentucky highlighting Hardin County.png
Location in the state of Kentucky
Map of the USA highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1793
Seat Elizabethtown
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 0.30%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

94174
Time zone Eastern : UTC-5/-4
Website: www.hcky.org
Named for: Colonel John Hardin (1753–1792), American Revolutionary War soldier serving with George Rogers Clark, killed in Northwest Indian War.

Hardin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It was formed in 1793. As of 2000, the population was 94,174. Its county seat is at Elizabethtown6. The county is named for John Hardin, a Continental Army officer during the American Revolution. President Abraham Lincoln was born in what was then Hardin County near Hodgenville, now part of modern-day LaRue County.

Hardin County is a limited dry county, meaning that sale of alcohol in the county is prohibited except by the drink in restaurants seating at least 100 diners in the cities of Elizabethtown and Radcliff, and at the Pine Valley Golf Resort.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,631 km² (630 sq mi). 1,626 km² (628 sq mi) of it is land and 5 km² (2 sq mi) of it (0.30%) is water.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 94,174 people, 34,497 households, and 25,355 families residing in the county. The population density was 58/km² (150/sq mi). There were 37,673 housing units at an average density of 23/km² (60/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 81.99% White, 11.87% Black or African American, 0.42% Native American, 1.80% Asian, 0.22% Pacific Islander, 1.35% from other races, and 2.35% from two or more races. 3.35% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 34,497 households out of which 38.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.80% were married couples living together, 11.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.50% were non-families. 22.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.07. The largest metropolitan area in the county is the City of Elizabethtown.

In the county the population was spread out with 27.60% under the age of 18, 10.60% from 18 to 24, 31.50% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 9.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 102.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,744, and the median income for a family was $43,610. Males had a median income of $30,743 versus $22,688 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,487. About 8.20% of families and 10.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.50% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Military base

See also

Coordinates: 37°42′N 85°58′W / 37.70, -85.96

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Hardin County, Kentucky. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Hardin County, KentuckyRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Kentucky  +
Short name Hardin County  +

This article uses material from the "Hardin County, Kentucky" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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