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Hartmann's solution or compound sodium lactate is a solution that is isotonic with blood and intended for intravenous administration. Hartmann's IV Infusion is used to replace body fluid and mineral salts that may be lost for a variety of medical reasons. Hartmann's IV Infusion is especially suitable when the losses result in too much acid being present in the blood. Hartmann's solution is abbreviated as "CSL". It is very similar—though not identical to—lactated Ringer's solution, the ionic concentrations of which differ.

Contents

Overview

One litre of Hartmann's solution contains:

Generally, the sodium, chloride, potassium and lactate come from NaCl (sodium chloride), NaC3H5O3 (sodium lactate), CaCl2 (calcium chloride), and KCl (potassium chloride). How it is given: Hartmann's IV infusion will be given at a slow rate of injection (drip)

Contraindications

Hartmann's solution is said to be contraindicated in patients with diabetes mellitus, as one of the isomers of lactate is gluconeogenic[1]. Hartmann solution should not be given if you have congestive heart failure (constant wheezing, shortness of breath) ischaemic stroke (have had a stroke) liver disease as a consequence of alcoholism, or severe reduction in kidney function

Side effects

As with any medicines, some side effects may occur. Some swelling of the hands, ankles and feet may be experienced due to retention fluid in the body. In rare circumstances, this may also involve the lungs, which may cause some breathing difficulty. Other symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, headache, dizziness, drowsiness or confusion. Inflammation at the site of injection, or swelling of the veins near the site of injection is also possible.

See also

References

  1. ^ D. J. B. Thomas AND K. G. M. M. Alberti, 'Hyperglycaemic effects of Hartmann's solution during surgery in patients with maturity onset diabetes', British Journal of Anaesthesia, (1978, 50, 185) - http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/50/2/185
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