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Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport
HFJAIA Logo.png
Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson.jpg
IATA: ATLICAO: KATLFAA: ATL
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner City of Atlanta
Operator Department of Aviation
Serves Atlanta, Georgia
Location unincorporated areas, Atlanta, College Park, and Hapeville
Fulton & Clayton Counties
Hub for
Elevation AMSL 1,026 ft / 313 m
Coordinates 33°38′12″N 084°25′41″W / 33.63667°N 84.42806°W / 33.63667; -84.42806
Website www.atlanta-airport.com
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
8L/26R 9,000 2,743 Concrete
8R/26L 10,000 3,048 Concrete
9L/27R 11,890 3,624 Concrete
9R/27L 9,000 2,743 Concrete
10/28 9,000 2,743 Concrete
Helipads
Number Length Surface
ft m
H1 52 16 Asphalt
Statistics (2009)
Aircraft operations 1,080,908
Passengers 88,365,024
Source: Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport[1]
Hartsfield–Jackson International Airport's Diagram
A line of automated and staffed ticketing counters for Delta, Atlanta's major tenant airline.

Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (IATA: ATLICAO: KATLFAA LID: ATL), known locally as Atlanta Airport, Hartsfield Airport, and Hartsfield–Jackson, is located seven miles (11 km) south of the central business district of Atlanta, Georgia, United States. It is the world's busiest airport by passenger traffic, serving 88 million passengers per year, as well as by number of landings and take-offs.[2] The airport is the primary hub of Delta Air Lines, AirTran Airways, and Delta Connection partner Atlantic Southeast Airlines; the Delta hub is the world's largest airline hub. Delta Air Lines flew 55.96% of passengers from the airport in 2009, AirTran flew 17.75%, and Atlantic Southeast Airlines flew 14.35%.[3] The airport has 151 domestic and 28 international gates.[4]

Hartsfield–Jackson held its ranking as the world's busiest airport in 2008, both in terms of passengers and number of flights, by accommodating 88 million passengers and 970,235 flights.[3] Many of the nearly one million flights are domestic flights from within the United States where Atlanta serves as a major hub for travel throughout the Southern United States.

Hartsfield–Jackson International Airport has international service to North America, South America, Central America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. As an international gateway to the United States, Hartsfield–Jackson ranks seventh.[3]

The airport is located mostly in unincorporated areas in Fulton and Clayton counties; the city limits of Atlanta,[5] College Park,[6] and Hapeville extend to the airport grounds.[7] The airport is served by MARTA's Red/Gold rail line.

Contents

History

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport's Air Traffic Control Tower

Hartsfield–Jackson had its beginnings with a five-year, rent free lease on 287 acres (116 ha) that had been the home of an abandoned auto racetrack. The lease was signed on April 16, 1925, by Mayor Walter Sims, who committed the city to develop it into an airfield. As part of the agreement, the property was renamed Candler Field after its former owner, Coca-Cola tycoon and former Atlanta mayor Asa Candler. The first flight into Candler Field was on September 15, 1926, a Florida Airways mail plane flying from Jacksonville, Florida. In May 1928, Pitcairn Aviation began service to Atlanta, followed in June 1930 by Delta Air Service. Later these two airlines, known as Eastern Air Lines and Delta Air Lines, respectively, would both use Atlanta as their chief hubs.[citation needed]

It was a busy airport from its inception and by the end of 1930 it placed third behind New York City and Chicago for regular daily flights with sixteen arriving and departing.[8] Candler Field's first control tower was opened March 1939.[9]

See also: Atlanta Army Airfield

In October 1940 the U.S. government declared it a military airfield and the United States Army Air Force operated Atlanta Army Airfield jointly with Candler Field. The Air Force used the airport primarily for the servicing of transient aircraft, with many different types of combat aircraft being maintained at the airport. During World War II, the airport doubled in size and set a record of 1,700 takeoffs and landings in a single day, making it the nation's busiest airport in terms of flight operation. Atlanta Army Airfield closed after war's end.[9]

In 1946 Candler Field was renamed Atlanta Municipal Airport. In 1948, more than one million passengers passed through a war surplus hangar that served as a terminal building. On June 1, 1956, an Eastern Airlines flight to Montreal, Canada was the first international flight out of Atlanta. In 1957, Atlanta had its first jet flight: a Sud Aviation Caravelle from Washington D.C. That same year, work on a new terminal began to help alleviate congestion. Atlanta was the busiest airport in the country with more than two million passengers passing through that year and, between noon and 2 p.m. each day, it became the busiest airport in the world.[9]

On May 3, 1961, a new $21 million terminal opened, the largest in the country, being able to accommodate over six million travelers a year. The new airport was stretched past its capacity the very first year when nine and half million people passed through.[10] In 1967, the city of Atlanta and the airlines began to work on a master plan for future development of Atlanta Municipal Airport.[citation needed]

Construction had begun on the present midfield terminal in January 1977 under the administration of Mayor Maynard Jackson. It was the largest construction project in the South, costing $500 million. Named for former Atlanta mayor William Berry Hartsfield, who did much to promote air travel, William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport opened on September 21, 1980, on-time and under budget.[11] It was designed to accommodate up to 55 million passengers per year and covered 2.5 million square feet (230,000 m²). In December 1984 a 9000-foot (3 km) fourth parallel runway was completed, and another runway was extended to 11,889 feet (3.6 km) the following year.[9]

In May 2001, construction of a 9,000-foot (2,700 m) fifth runway (10-28) began. It was completed at a cost of $1.28 billion and opened on May 27, 2006,[12] and was the first runway added since 1984. It bridges Interstate 285 (the Perimeter) on the south side of the airport. The massive project, which involved putting fill dirt eleven stories high in some places, destroyed some surrounding neighborhoods, and dramatically changed the scenery of two cemeteries on the property, Flat Rock Cemetery and Hart Cemetery.[13] It was added to help ease some of the traffic problems caused by landing small- and mid-size aircraft on the longer runways which are also used by larger planes such as the Boeing 777, which generally require longer takeoff distances than the smaller planes. With the fifth runway, Hartsfield–Jackson is one of only a few airports that can perform triple simultaneous landings.[14] The fifth runway is expected to increase the capacity for landings and take-offs by 40%, from an average of 184 flights per hour to 237 flights per hour.[15]

Along with the construction of the fifth runway, a new control tower was built to see the entire length of the runway. The new control tower is the tallest airport control tower in the United States, with a height of over 398 feet (121 m). The old control tower, 585 feet (178 m) away from the new control tower, was demolished August 5, 2006. [16]

In 2003, Atlanta's city council voted on October 20 to change the name from Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport to the current Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport, in honor of former mayor Maynard Jackson, the first African-American mayor of Atlanta, who had died on June 23, 2003. The council had initially planned on renaming the airport solely for Mayor Jackson, but public outcry,[17] especially by Mayor Hartsfield's descendants, prompted the compromise.[18]

In April 2007, an "end-around taxiway" opened, called Taxiway Victor. It is expected to save an estimated $26 million to $30 million in fuel by allowing airplanes landing on the northernmost runway to taxi to the gate area without preventing other aircraft from taking off. The taxiway drops approximately 30 feet (9.1 m) from the runway elevation to allow takeoffs to continue.[19]

As a result of the Southeastern U.S. drought of 2007, the airport (the eighth-largest water user in the state) has made changes to reduce water usage. This includes adjusting toilets, of which there are 725 commodes and 338 urinals, in addition to 601 sinks. (The two terminals alone use 917,000 gallons or about 3.5 million liters each day in average.) It also suspended the practice of using firetrucks to spray water over aircraft when the pilot made a last landing before retirement (a water salute).[20][21] The city of Macon offered to sell water to the airport, through a proposed pipeline.[22]

The airport today employs approximately 55,300 airline, ground transportation, concessionaire, security, federal government, City of Atlanta and Airport tenant employees and is considered the largest employment center in the State of Georgia. With a payroll of $2.4 billion, the airport has a direct and indirect economic impact of $3.2 billion on the local and regional economy and a total annual, regional economic impact of more than $19.8 billion.[23]

Expansion

Sign installation visible from departing flights, emphasizing the presence of Delta Air Lines.
A view of the International Concourse E and Control Tower at night

In 1999, Hartsfield–Jackson's leadership established the Development Program: "Focus On the Future" involving multiple construction projects with the intention of preparing the airport to handle a projected demand of 121 million passengers in 2015. The program was originally budgeted at $5.4 billion over a ten-year period, but due to project delays and increased construction costs, the total is now projected at over $9 billion.[24]

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Hartsfield–Jackson Rental Car Center

See Also: ATL Skytrain

The Hartsfield–Jackson Rental Car Center, which opened on December 8, 2009, houses all ten current airport rental agencies with capacity for additional companies.[25] The complex features 9,900 parking spaces split up between two four-story parking decks that together cover 2.8 million square feet, a 137,000 square foot customer service center, and a maintenance center for vehicles, which features 140 gas pumps,and 30 bays for washing with each one equipped with a water recovery system.[25] The automated people mover, nicknamed the ATL Skytrain, (using Mitsubishi Crystal Mover equipment) connects the facility to the airport and to the Gateway Center of the Georgia International Convention Center and the Hartsfield–Jackson Rental Car Center.[25] A four-lane roadway was built across Interstate 85 to connect the Hartsfield–Jackson Rental Car Center to the existing airport road network.[26]

Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr. International Terminal

New terminal exterior rendering

In July 2003, former Atlanta mayor Shirley Franklin announced a new terminal to be named for Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr.. The new international terminal would be built on the east side of the airport near International Concourse E, on a site that has been occupied by air cargo facilities and the midfield control tower. It would add twelve new gates able to hold wide-body jets, as well as new check-in desks and a baggage claim area solely for international carriers. Additionally, the international terminal would have its own parking lot just for international passengers with over 1,100 spots. Arriving international passengers whose final destination is Atlanta will be able to keep possession of their luggage as they proceed to exit the airport. The new terminal will be affixed to Terminal E by the people mover tram and will also have new ground transportation access from I-75.[27]

It was slated to open in 2006. However, time and cost overruns led general manager Ben DeCosta to cancel the design contract in August 2005. The very next day the company sued the airport claiming "fraud" and "bad faith", blaming the airport authority for the problems.[28] Recently, Ben DeCosta awarded a new design contract on the new international terminal to Atlanta Gateway Designers (AGD). Estimated prices place the terminal's cost at $1.4 billion and expected to open in 2011.[24][29]

Also scheduled to be completed after the new international terminal and concourse is a new terminal south of the current terminals. The new terminal is expected to include up to 70 gates.[30] The project is currently known as the South Gate Complex, and is estimated to cost around $1.8 billion. The new terminal will be connected to the main terminal by an expanded automated people mover system. [31]

Layout

The Transportation Mall. The portion between Concourse T and Concourse A also includes African-themed artwork and photographs

Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport has terminal and concourse space totaling 5.8 million square feet (~0.54 km²).[4] The airport has two terminals where passengers check in and claim bags, the North Terminal and the South Terminal. The two terminals are parts of a larger building. The portions of the building in between the two terminals include the Atrium (which has a large, open seating area, concessionaires and a bank), the main security checkpoint, car rental agencies and a MARTA (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) train station.[32]

Six concourse buildings, parallel to one another, exist for passenger boarding. The first concourse is directly connected to the main terminal, and is known as the T-Gates (for Terminal). The remaining five concourses are arranged successively in distance from the terminal as Concourses A, B, C, D, and E.[4] Concourse E is the international terminal, and was opened in 1994 in time for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, which were held in Atlanta .[33] International passengers who arrive in Atlanta are subjected to a security re-check after clearing customs due to the fact that the facility exits into the concourse instead of the main terminal lobby. The concourses are connected by an underground Transportation Mall, which begins at the main terminal and passes under the center of each concourse.[34] There used to be a second underground walkway between Concourses B and C located at the north end of the two concourses, that made it possible to transfer without returning all the way to the center of the concourse. This was originally constructed for Eastern Airlines, who occupied these two terminals. This is now blocked off and the old entrance at Terminal B has been replaced by a bank of arrival/departure monitors.

A concourse entrance to the underground people mover.

The Automated People Mover

In addition to a pedestrian walkway, which includes a series of moving walkways, connecting the concourses, the Transportation Mall also features an automated people mover. The Automated People Mover has a station at the east end of the main terminal for passengers entering the Transportation Mall after passing through security (this station also serves as the station for Concourse T), and a station at each of the remaining five concourses. There is an additional station for the Baggage Claim area, which is located directly underneath the Main Terminal. It is the world's busiest automated people mover, with over 64 million riders in 2002.[34]

MARTA Station

Hartsfield–Jackson also has its own train station on the city's rapid transit system, MARTA. The above-ground station is inside in the main building, between the north and south terminals on the west end. The Airport train station is currently the southernmost station in the MARTA system.[35]

Airlines and destinations

  • Note: All international arrivals (expect flights with customs pre-clearance) are handled at Concourse E.
Airlines Destinations Concourse
Aeroméxico Mexico City [resumes May 1] E
Air Canada Jazz Toronto-Pearson D
Air France Paris-Charles de Gaulle E
AirTran Airways Akron/Canton, Allentown [seasonal; begins May 4] Aruba, Atlantic City, Baltimore, Bloomington, Boston, Branson, Buffalo, Cancún, Charlotte, Chicago-Midway, Columbus (OH), Dallas/Fort Worth, Dayton, Denver, Detroit, Flint, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Gulfport/Biloxi, Harrisburg [seasonal; begins May 4] Houston-Hobby, Indianapolis, Jacksonville (FL), Kansas City, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Moline/Quad Cities, Montego Bay, Nassau, New Orleans, New York-LaGuardia, Newport News, Orlando, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Portland (ME) [seasonal], Raleigh/Durham, Richmond, Rochester (NY), St. Louis, San Antonio, San Diego [seasonal], San Francisco, San Juan, Sarasota/Bradenton, Seattle/Tacoma, Tampa, Tunica [begins May 6],[36] Washington-Dulles, Washington-Reagan, West Palm Beach, White Plains, Wichita C, D
Alaska Airlines Seattle/Tacoma D
American Airlines Chicago-O'Hare [ends April 5], Dallas/Fort Worth, Miami T
American Connection operated by Chautauqua Airlines St. Louis [ends April 5] T
American Eagle Chicago-O'Hare, Miami [begins April 6] T
British Airways London-Heathrow E
Continental Airlines Houston-Intercontinental, Newark D
Continental Express operated by Chautauqua Airlines Cleveland, Houston-Intercontinental D
Continental Express operated by ExpressJet Airlines Cleveland, Houston-Intercontinental, Newark D
Delta Air Lines Albuquerque, Anchorage [seasonal], Austin, Baltimore, Bermuda, Birmingham (AL), Boston, Bozeman [seasonal], Buffalo, Charleston (SC), Charlotte, Chicago-Midway, Chicago-O'Hare, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky, Colorado Springs, Columbus (OH), Dallas/Fort Worth, Dayton, Daytona Beach, Denver, Detroit, Eagle/Vail [seasonal], El Paso, Flint [begins May 1], Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Fort Walton Beach [resumes April 6], Grand Rapids [begins May 1], Gulfport/Biloxi, Hartford/Springfield, Hayden/Steamboat Springs [seasonal], Hilton Head Island, Honolulu, Houston-Intercontinental, Huntsville/Decatur, Indianapolis, Jackson (MS), Jackson Hole [seasonal], Jacksonville (FL), Kalispell [seasonal], Kansas City, Key West, Knoxville [begins April 6], Las Vegas, Lexington [seasonal, begins May 1], Little Rock [begins April 7], Los Angeles, Louisville, Manchester (NH), Melbourne (FL), Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Mobile, Montrose/Telluride [seasonal], Nashville, New Orleans, New York-JFK, New York-LaGuardia, Newark, Newport News, Norfolk, Oklahoma City, Ontario, Orange County, Orlando, Panama City (FL) [begins May 23], Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Portland (ME) [resumes April 6], Portland (OR), Providence, Raleigh/Durham, Reno/Tahoe, Richmond, Rochester (NY), Sacramento, St. Louis, St. Thomas, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose (CA), San Juan (PR), Sarasota/Bradenton, Savannah, Seattle/Tacoma, Tallahassee, Tampa, Tri-Cities, Tucson, Tupelo, Vancouver [seasonal], Washington-Dulles, Washington-Reagan, West Palm Beach T, A, B, E
Delta Air Lines Accra [begins June 1],[37] Amsterdam, Antigua, Aruba, Athens [seasonal], Barbados, Barcelona, Belize City, Bonaire, Bogotá, Brasilia, Brussels, Buenos Aires-Ezeiza, Cancún, Caracas, Copenhagen, Cozumel, Curaçao [seasonal], Dubai, Dublin, Düsseldorf, Fortaleza, Frankfurt, Grand Cayman, Guadalajara [seasonal], Guatemala City, Guayaquil [seasonal], Johannesburg, Kingston [seasonal], Lagos, Liberia (Costa Rica), Lima, London-Gatwick, London-Heathrow, Madrid, Managua, Manaus, Manchester (UK), Mexico City, Milan-Malpensa, Montego Bay, Moscow-Sheremetyevo [seasonal], Mumbai [resumes March 28], Munich, Nassau, Panama City, Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Port of Spain, Prague [seasonal], Providenciales, Puerto Plata [seasonal], Puerto Vallarta, Punta Cana, Quito, Rio de Janeiro-Galeão, Roatán, Rome-Fiumicino, St. Kitts [seasonal], St. Croix, St. Lucia, St. Maarten, San José de Costa Rica, San José del Cabo, San Salvador, Santiago de Chile, Santo Domingo, São Paulo-Guarulhos, San Pedro Sula, Stuttgart, Sydney (Australia) [ends May 31], Tegucigalpa, Tel Aviv, Tobago, Tokyo-Narita, Venice-Marco Polo [seasonal], Zürich T*, E

*Departing flights only

Delta Connection operated by Atlantic Southeast Airlines Akron/Canton, Albany (GA), Albany (NY), Alexandria, Allentown/Bethlehem, Appleton, Asheville, Augusta (GA), Austin, Baton Rouge, Birmingham (AL), Bloomington (IL), Blountville/Tri-Cities, Brunswick, Charleston (SC), Charleston (WV), Charlotte, Charlottesville, Chattanooga, Chicago-Midway [ends April 5], Cleveland, Columbia (SC), Columbus (GA), Columbus (MS), Dayton, Daytona Beach, Des Moines, Dothan, Evansville, Fayetteville (AR), Fayetteville (NC), Flint, Florence, Fort Walton Beach, Fort Wayne [ends April 5], Freeport, Gainesville, Grand Rapids [ends April 30], Great Exuma Island [begins June 13], Greensboro, Greenville/Spartanburg, Gulfport/Biloxi, Harrisburg, Houston-Hobby, Houston-Intercontinental [ends April 5], Huntsville/Decatur, Indianapolis [ends April 5], Jackson (MS), Jacksonville (NC), Kansas City [ends April 5], Killeen, Key West, Knoxville, Lafayette, Lexington, Little Rock, Louisville, Lynchburg, Manchester (NH) [ends April 5], Melbourne (FL), Meridian, Milwaukee, Mobile, Moline/Quad Cities, Monroe, Montgomery, Montréal-Trudeau, Myrtle Beach, Nashville, New Bern, Newburgh, Newport News, New Orleans, Norfolk, North Eleuthera, Oklahoma City, Omaha, Panama City (FL), Pensacola, Peoria, Pittsburgh, Providence, Raleigh/Durham, Richmond, Roanoke, Rochester (NY), St. Louis, San Antonio, Sarasota, Savannah, Shreveport, Sioux Falls, South Bend, Springfield, Syracuse, Tallahassee, Toronto-Pearson, Tri-Cities (TN/VA), Tulsa, Valdosta, Valparaiso, White Plains, Wichita, Wilmington (NC) C, D
Delta Connection operated by Comair Asheville [begins April 6], Birmingham (AL), Charleston (SC), Chattanooga [begins April 6], Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky, Cleveland [begins April 6], Columbus (OH), Dayton, Flint, Grand Rapids [ends April 30], Greensboro, Harrisburg, Huntsville/Decatur, Houston-Hobby, Lexington, Louisville, Manchester (NH), Nashville, New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Omaha, Portland (ME), Providence, Raleigh/Durham, Springfield (MO), Syracuse, Tulsa, Washington-Dulles D
Delta Connection operated by Compass Airlines Charlotte, Louisville A
Delta Connection operated by Mesaba Airlines Chattanooga, Columbus (MS) [begins April 6], Florence (SC), Hilton Head [seasonal], Muscle Shoals, Tupelo D
Delta Connection operated by Pinnacle Airlines Austin, Charlotte, Chicago-O'Hare, Chicago-Midway, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky, Cleveland [begins April 6], Dayton, Fort Wayne, Greenville/Spartanburg [begins April 6], Houston-Hobby, Houston-Intercontinental, Huntsville/Decatur, Kansas City, Knoxville, Lexington, Louisville, Memphis, Milwaukee, Nashville, New Orleans, Newark [ends April 5], Norfolk, Oklahoma City, Portland (ME), Providence, Richmond, St. Louis, San Antonio, Savannah, Tallahassee, Washington-Dulles, Washington-Reagan, White Plains B
Delta Connection operated by Pinnacle Airlines Belize City [seasonal], Cozumel [seasonal], Guadalajara [seasonal], Monterrey, Providenciales [seasonal], St. Croix E
Delta Connection operated by Shuttle America Charlotte, Chicago-Midway, Charleston (SC), Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky, Columbus (OH), Fort Walton Beach, Houston-Hobby, Houston Intercontinental, Indianapolis, Knoxville, Louisville, Memphis, Milwaukee, Nashville, Norfolk, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Antonio, Sarasota/Bradenton, Washington-Dulles, Washington-Reagan A
Delta Connection operated by SkyWest Airlines Aspen [seasonal], Chicago-O'Hare, Halifax [Seasonal], Montrose [Seasonal], St. Louis B
Frontier Airlines Denver D
Frontier Airlines operated by Republic Airlines Denver D
GeorgiaSkies[38] Athens (GA), Macon E
KLM Amsterdam E
Korean Air Seoul-Incheon E
Lufthansa Frankfurt E
Midwest Airlines operated by Republic Airlines Milwaukee D
Spirit Airlines Fort Lauderdale, Myrtle Beach [seasonal; begins May 1] D
United Airlines Chicago-O'Hare T
United Express operated by Mesa Airlines Chicago-O'Hare, Denver, Washington-Dulles T
United Express operated by Shuttle America Chicago-O'Hare, Denver, Washington-Dulles T
US Airways Charlotte, Philadelphia, Phoenix D
US Airways Express operated by Air Wisconsin Philadelphia D
US Airways Express operated by Mesa Airlines Charlotte D
US Airways Express operated by PSA Airlines Charlotte D
US Airways Express operated by Republic Airlines Charlotte, Philadelphia D

Atlantic Aviation

Due to access restrictions, Wings Air (USA) currently operates from the Atlantic Aviation Fixed base operator facility and provides shuttle transportation for passengers connecting to the main passenger terminals.[39] GeorgiaSkies won gate access at the airport and moved its operations from the Atlantic Aviation facility to Concourse E at the main passenger terminal.[40]

Airlines Destinations
Locair Beckeley[41]
Wings Air (USA) Athens, Lawrenceville, Macon

Cargo airlines

Accidents and incidents

Accidents en route

Incidents

Chemical spills

At the beginning of January 2002, the glycol solution used for deicing during winter weather operations overflowed from the glycol collection system into the drainage system that eventually flows into the Flint River. Because the airport is built over the beginning point of the Flint River, one of the major rivers in Georgia, it ended up in water systems which supply drinking water downstream. The problem was fixed before the next winter, and the drainage system has not backed up again.

Security incidents

On November 16, 2001, a man left the secure area to retrieve his camera bag, which he had left behind, and then tried to bypass the wait at the security checkpoint by running the wrong way down the escalators at the secure area's exit. As a result, the entire airport was evacuated, including all aircraft, and operations halted for three hours.[47]

The man said that he tried to bypass the security line because he would be late for a flight he was taking to see a Georgia Bulldogs football game. As part of his sentence, he was not allowed to attend any Bulldogs games for the 2002 season.[48]

Crime

From December 2006 to March 2007, there were 30 arrests for indecent exposure involving reported sex acts in airport bathrooms.[49] Several prominent persons were arrested, including an advisor for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a Spelman College professor, and the Chairman of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority board of directors.[50]

Lightning strike

In 2009, a severe thunderstorm on the evening of April 23 caused a lightning strike directly to the control tower at 8:45 (20:45) EDT. The airport was already in a ground stop due to dangerous wind shear, and four minutes after the strike, the tower was evacuated after a smoke odor was detected. After returning at 9:10, a power outage at 9:20 caused further problems, including major flight delays and diversions due also to the lightning (at over 1000 strikes per hour) and large amounts of hail that continued in the vicinity. Partial power outages continued to affect the airport and the northern runway lighting for more than an hour afterward, leaving only three other runways to handle the backlog. An FAA official said that neither the new nor the old tower had been struck in at least 18 years.[51] Several storm chasers 4-5 miles east of the airport reported a wall cloud and descending funnel during the severe thunderstorm.

In culture

As the dominant airport in the Southern United States, and the nation's busiest in terms of passengers handled (mainly due to being Delta's flagship hub), there is an old joke in the region (and elsewhere) which states that, upon one's death, regardless of whether he or she goes to Heaven or Hell, in either case he or she will connect in Atlanta to get there.[52][53][54][55][56][57]

Other notes

Air traffic controllers for tower and ground control operations refer to the letter "D" using the word "Dixie" instead of the ICAO phonetic term "Delta" to avoid confusion with Delta Air Lines aircraft (note the use of "DIXIE" for taxiway "D" in the FAA's airport diagram, listed in the external links below).[citation needed]

The People Mover's recorded announcements list "Concourse D as in David," rather than "Delta" or "Dixie."

See also

References

  1. ^ "Year-to-Date Passenger Data" (PDF). Department of Aviation, Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport. December 2007. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/docs/Traffic/200812.pdf. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  2. ^ "Atlanta airport still the "busiest"". Hartsfield-Jackson. 2010-01-04. Archived from the original on 2007-01-06. http://web.archive.org/web/20070106042352/http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories/2007/01/04/0104airport.html. 
  3. ^ a b c "Year-to-Date Passenger Data" (PDF). Department of Aviation, Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport. December 2007. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/docs/Traffic/200912.pdf. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  4. ^ a b c "Fact Sheet". City of Atlanta. February 2007. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/ATL_FactSheet.aspx. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  5. ^ Zoning Ordinance, City of Atlanta, Georgia
  6. ^ "City Maps." City of College Park. Retrieved on May 25, 2009.
  7. ^ "Official Zoning Map." City of Hapeville. Retrieved on May 19, 2009.
  8. ^ Garrett, Franklin, Atlanta and Its Environs, 1954, Vol.II, p.851
  9. ^ a b c d "Airport History". Atlanta-airport.com. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/Airport_History.aspx. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  10. ^ (book) Sunshine Skies: Historic Commuter Airlines of Florida and Georgia. Atlanta, Georgia: Zeus Press. November 2008. pp. 262. ISBN 9781440424748. http://www.sunshineskies.net/book.html. 
  11. ^ "Maynard Jackson Jr". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 2003-06-25. http://www.legacy.com/ATLANTA/Obituaries.asp?Page=LifeStory&PersonId=1113182. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  12. ^ "Atlanta International Airport: Fifth Runway". City of Atlanta. May 2006. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/5thMain.htm. 
  13. ^ "Flat Rock Cemetery". http://tomitronics.com/flat%20rock%20cemetery/index.html. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  14. ^ "Aviation "Bridges" the Gap for Future Growth". Williams-Russell and Johnson, Inc. http://www.wrjinc.com/index.php?pid=95. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  15. ^ "Atlanta International Airport: Benchmark Results" (PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. 2004. http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ato/publications/bench/DOWNLOAD/pdf/ATL_2004.pdf. 
  16. ^ Airport Business
  17. ^ David M. Halbfinger (2003-08-13). "Atlanta Is Divided Over Renaming Airport for Former Mayor". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/13/us/atlanta-is-divided-over-renaming-airport-for-former-mayor.html. Retrieved 2009-06-19. 
  18. ^ Airline Industry Information (2003-10-21). "Atlanta airport to be renamed Hartsfield–Jackson". AllBusiness.com. http://www.allbusiness.com/operations/shipping-air-freight/663285-1.html. Retrieved 2009-06-19. 
  19. ^ Tharpe, Jim (2007-03-18). "An end-around to efficiency: Hartsfield–Jackson strip offers safety, boosts capacity". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on 2007-03-22. http://web.archive.org/web/20070322165005/http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2007/03/18/0319metairport.html. 
  20. ^ "Airport Hoping to Flush Away Less Water". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 2007-10-29. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2007/10/28/airportdrought_1029.html. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  21. ^ "Fewer, Faster Flushes for Airport Toilets". WSB TV. 2007-10-29. http://www.wsbtv.com/drought/14448080/detail.html. Retrieved 2008-06-13. 
  22. ^ "Drought: Macon Offers Water to ATL Airport". Georgia Public Broadcasting News. 2007-10-24. http://gpbnews.blogspot.com/2007/10/drought-macon-offers-water-to-atl.html. Retrieved 2008-06-13. 
  23. ^ "Financial Statements June 30, 2007 and 2006" (PDF). City of Atlanta, Georgia Department of Aviation. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/pdfs/FY07DOAFinancials.pdf. 
  24. ^ a b Ramos, Rachel Tobin (2007-09-21). "Hartsfield project costs soar to $9B". Atlanta Business Chronicle. http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2007/09/24/story2.html. Retrieved 2007-11-01. 
  25. ^ a b c "Rental Car Center (RCC) - Construction". Atlanta-airport.com. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/RentalCarCenter/RentalCarCenter_FAQ.aspx. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  26. ^ "HJAIA - Airport Construction". City of Atlanta. http://atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/construction.htm. Retrieved 2007-11-01. 
  27. ^ "HJAIA - Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr. International Terminal". City of Atlanta. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/fifth/ceela.htm. Retrieved 2007-11-01. 
  28. ^ "City Sued Over Airport Terminal". 11Alive.com. 2005-08-17. http://www.11alive.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=67892. 
  29. ^ Jim Tharpe (2008-02-27). "Passenger Perks the Buzz of Proposed International Terminal". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/business/stories/2008/02/27/airport_0228.html. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  30. ^ "New Passenger Complex to Handle Growing Airport Needs". Hartsfield–Jackson News. December 2005. http://www.atlantaairportbusinessopportunities.com/hjn/2005/12/dvlp2.htm. 
  31. ^ "Construction - Maynard". Atlanta-airport.com. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/airport/frmAirportinformationConstruction_Maynard.aspx. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  32. ^ "2005 Annual Report" (PDF). City of Atlanta Department of Aviation. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/pdfs/2005%20Annual%20Report_Website.pdf. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  33. ^ "Airport History". Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/histpage.htm. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  34. ^ a b "Transportation Mall/People Mover". Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/customer_service/mallpage.htm. Retrieved 2007-07-06. 
  35. ^ "Airport Station Helper". Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. http://www.itsmarta.com/explore/airporthelp.htm. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  36. ^ [1]
  37. ^ "Delta Air Lines Newsroom - Delta Air Lines New and Returning Seasonal International Service". News.delta.com. http://news.delta.com/index.php?DB=mr4enh_delta&s=11. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  38. ^ "GeorgiaSkies : 877-849-4997 : Go Green!". Pacificwings.com. http://www.pacificwings.com/gsky/gs/airport-information.asp?sct=atlanta. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  39. ^ "GeorgiaSkies - Atlanta, Georgia (ATL)". GeorgiaSkies. http://www.pacificwings.com/gsky/gs/airport-information.asp?sct=atlanta. Retrieved 2009-03-02. 
  40. ^ Fain, Travis (2009-10-29). "Georgia Skies now has gate access at Atlanta airport - Related stories". Macon.com. http://www.macon.com/532/story/896720.html. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  41. ^ "Airport to offer direct flights to Atlanta » Local News » The Register-Herald, Beckley, West Virginia". Register-herald.com. http://www.register-herald.com/local/local_story_315224801.html. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  42. ^ "Altered taxiway cited in crash that killed 49". International Herald Tribune. 2009-08-28. http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/08/28/news/crash.php. Retrieved 2008-09-27. 
  43. ^ "May 23, 1960.". Our Georgia History. http://ourgeorgiahistory.com/search?id=7126. Retrieved 2008-09-26. 
  44. ^ "Stowaway's Body Found In Delta Jet." CBS News.
  45. ^ "FAA probes near-collision at Atlanta airport". Associated Press (MSNBC). 2008-01-12. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22624189/. Retrieved 2008-04-07. 
  46. ^ Marylynn Ryan (2009-10-21). "FAA probes plane's landing on Atlanta airport's taxiway". CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/10/21/georgia.taxiway.incursion/index.html. Retrieved 2010-02-05. 
  47. ^ "Suspect in custody in Atlanta airport incident". CNN. 2001-11-16. http://archives.cnn.com/2001/US/11/16/rec.hartsfield.evacuation/index.html. Retrieved 2007-08-02. 
  48. ^ Font size Print E-mail Share By Bootie Cosgrove-Mather (2002-03-06). "Fan Gets Jail Time For Airport Shutdown". CBS News. http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/03/06/national/main503151.shtml. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  49. ^ Shirek, Jon (2007-03-31). "Delta Employee Suspended for Sex Arrest". 11 Alive News. http://www.11alive.com/news/article_news.aspx?storyid=94543&provider=top. 
  50. ^ Donsky, Paul (2007-03-15). "MARTA chairman won't resign: Ed Wall arrested for having sex in airport bathroom". Atlanta Journal Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2007/03/15/0315metwall.html?imw=Y. 
  51. ^ "Atlanta airport reopens after lightning strike". CNN.com. 2009-04-23. http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/04/23/ga.airport.storms/. Retrieved 2010-03-11. 
  52. ^ King, Wayne. "All of the South Changing Planes at Atlanta; Complaints Are Rising More Service Sought Another Disturbing Fact Petitions to C.A.B." The New York Times. Thursday July 27, 1978. A14. Retrieved on August 4, 2009.
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  54. ^ Moorhead, Jim. "Flying Is More Than Taking Off." The Evening Independent. October 25, 1980. 1B. 8 of 32 at Google News. Retrieved on August 4, 2009.
  55. ^ Martin. Janice. "Hooray for Ray, a pilot too fed up to take off." St. Petersburg Times. Saturday July 26, 1986. 1-B. Google News 15 of 94. Retrieved on August 4, 2009.
  56. ^ Warner, Gary A. "Flight Layovers / Essay -- Stuck In Atlanta: The Pits In The Heart Of The Peach." The Orange County Register at The Seattle Times. Sunday March 16, 1997. Retrieved on August 4, 2009.
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External links

Coordinates: 33°38′12″N 84°25′41″W / 33.63672°N 84.428066°W / 33.63672; -84.428066


Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport
IATA: ATLICAO: KATLFAA: ATL
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner City of Atlanta
Operator Department of Aviation
Serves Atlanta, Georgia
Location unincorporated areas, Atlanta, College Park, and Hapeville
Fulton & Clayton Counties
Elevation AMSL 1,026 ft / 313 m
Coordinates 33°38′12″N 084°25′41″W / 33.63667°N 84.42806°W / 33.63667; -84.42806
Website www.atlanta-airport.com
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
8L/26R 9,000 2,743 Concrete
8R/26L 10,000 3,048 Concrete
9L/27R 11,890 3,624 Concrete
9R/27L 9,000 2,743 Concrete
10/28 9,000 2,743 Concrete
Helipads
Number Length Surface
ft m
H1 52 16 Asphalt
Statistics (2008)
Aircraft operations 978,824
Source: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport[1]

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (IATA: ATLICAO: KATLFAA LID: ATL), known locally as Atlanta Airport, Hartsfield Airport, and Hartsfield-Jackson, is located seven miles (11 km) south of the central business district of Atlanta, Georgia, United States. It is the world's busiest airport by passenger traffic as well as landings and take-offs.[2] The airport is the primary hub of Delta Air Lines, AirTran Airways, Delta Connection under the Shuttle America name, and Delta Connection partner Atlantic Southeast Airlines; the Delta hub is the world's largest airline hub. Delta Air Lines flew 55.4% of passengers from the airport in 2008, AirTran flew 19.27%, and Atlantic Southeast Airlines flew 12.94%.[1] The airport has 151 domestic and 28 international gates.[3]

Hartsfield-Jackson held its ranking as the world's busiest airport in 2008, both in terms of passengers and number of flights, by accommodating 90.0 million passengers and 978,824 flights.[1] Many of these flights are domestic flights from within the United States where Atlanta serves as a major transfer point for flights to and from smaller cities throughout the Southern United States.

Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport has international service to North America, South America, Central America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. As an international gateway to the United States, Hartsfield-Jackson ranks seventh; John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City is first.[4] However, the airport is increasingly becoming a major gateway for international flights; 2008 saw international traffic jump 3.18 percent over the previous year, with more than 4.6 million passengers boarding international flights.[1]

The airport is located mostly in unincorporated areas in Fulton and Clayton counties; the city limits of Atlanta,[5] College Park,[6] and Hapeville extend to the airport grounds.[7] The airport is reachable by MARTA.

Contents

History


Hartsfield-Jackson had its beginnings with a five-year, rent free lease on Template:Convert/LonAoffDbSoffNa that had been the home of an abandoned auto racetrack. The lease was signed on April 16, 1925, by Mayor Walter Sims, who committed the city to develop it into an airfield. As part of the agreement, the property was renamed Candler Field after its former owner, Coca-Cola tycoon and former Atlanta mayor Asa Candler. The first flight into Candler Field was on September 15, 1926, a Florida Airways mail plane flying from Jacksonville, Florida. In May 1928, Pitcairn Aviation began service to Atlanta, followed in June 1930 by Delta Air Service. Later these two airlines, known as Eastern Air Lines and Delta Air Lines, respectively, would both use Atlanta as their chief hubs.Template:Fact

It was a busy airport from its inception and by the end of 1930 it placed third behind New York City and Chicago for regular daily flights with sixteen arriving and departing.[8] Candler Field's first control tower was opened March 1939.[9]

See also: Atlanta Army Airfield

In October 1940 the U.S. government declared it an military airfield and the United States Army Air Force operated Atlanta Army Airfield jointly with Candler Field. The Air Force used the airport primarily for the servicing of transient aircraft, with many different types of combat aircraft being maintained at the airport. During World War II, the airport doubled in size and set a record of 1,700 takeoffs and landings in a single day, making it the nation's busiest airport in terms of flight operation. Atlanta Army Airfield closed after war's end.[10]

In 1946 Candler Field was renamed Atlanta Municipal Airport. In 1948, more than one million passengers passed through a war surplus hangar that served as a terminal building. On June 1, 1956, an Eastern Airlines flight to Montreal, Canada was the first international flight out of Atlanta. In 1957, Atlanta had its first jet flight: a Sud Aviation Caravelle from Washington D.C. That same year, work on a new terminal began to help alleviate congestion. Atlanta was the busiest airport in the country with more than two million passengers passing through that year and, between noon and 2 p.m. each day, it became the busiest airport in the world.[11]

On May 3, 1961, the new $21 million terminal opened, the largest in the country, being able to accommodate over six million travelers a year. The new airport was stretched past its capacity the very first year when nine and half million people passed through. In 1967, the city of Atlanta and the airlines began to work on a master plan for future development of Atlanta Municipal Airport.Template:Fact

Construction was begun on the present midfield terminal in January 1977 under the administration of Mayor Maynard Jackson. It was the largest construction project in the South, costing $500 million. Named for former Atlanta mayor William Berry Hartsfield, who did much to promote air travel, William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport opened on September 21, 1980, on-time and under budget.[12] It was designed to accommodate up to 55 million passengers per year and covered 2.5 million square feet (230,000 m²). In December 1984 a 9000-foot (3 km) fourth parallel runway was completed, and another runway was extended to 11,889 feet (3.6 km) the following year.[13]

In May 2001, construction of a 9,000-foot (Template:Convert/LoffAonSon) fifth runway (10-28) began. It was completed at a cost of $1.28 billion and opened on May 27, 2006,[14] and was the first runway added since 1984. It bridges Interstate 285 (the Perimeter) on the south side of the airport. The massive project, which involved putting fill dirt eleven stories high in some places, destroyed some surrounding neighborhoods, and families are able to visit two cemeteries on the property only occasionally. It was added to help ease some of the traffic problems caused by landing small- and mid-size aircraft on the longer runways which are also used by larger planes such as the Boeing 777, which generally require longer takeoff distances than the smaller planes. With the fifth runway, Hartsfield-Jackson is one of only a few airports that can perform triple simultaneous landings.[15] The fifth runway is expected to increase the capacity for landings and take-offs by 40%, from an average of 184 flights per hour to 237 flights per hour.[16]


Along with the construction of the fifth runway, a new control tower was built to see the entire length of the runway. The new control tower is the tallest airport control tower in the United States, with a height of over 398 feet (121 m). The old control tower, 585 feet (178 m) away from the new control tower, was demolished August 5, 2006.Template:Fact

In 2003, Atlanta's city council voted on October 20 to change the name from Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport to the current Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, in honor of former mayor Maynard Jackson, the first African-American mayor of Atlanta, who had died on June 23, 2003. The council had initially planned on renaming the airport solely for Mayor Jackson, but public outcry,[17] especially by Mayor Hartsfield's descendants, prompted the compromise.[18]

In April 2007, an "end-around taxiway" opened, called Taxiway Victor. It is expected to save an estimated $26 million to $30 million in fuel by allowing airplanes landing on the northernmost runway to taxi to the gate area without preventing other aircraft from taking off. The taxiway drops approximately 30 feet (9.1 m) from the runway elevation to allow takeoffs to continue.[19]

The airport today employs approximately 55,300 airline, ground transportation, concessionaire, security, federal government, City of Atlanta and Airport tenant employees and is considered the largest employment center in the State of Georgia. With a payroll of $2.4 billion, the airport has a direct and indirect economic impact of $3.2 billion on the local and regional economy and a total annual, regional economic impact of more than $19.8 billion.[20]

Expansion

.]]


In 1999, Hartsfield-Jackson's leadership established the Development Program: "Focus On the Future" involving multiple construction projects with the intention of preparing the airport to handle a projected demand of 121 million passengers in 2015. The program was originally budgeted at $5.4 billion over a ten-year period, but due to project delays and increased construction costs, the total is now projected at over $9 billion.[21]

Hartsfield-Jackson Rental Car Center

See Also: ATL Skytrain

The Hartsfield-Jackson Rental Car Center, scheduled for completion by November 2009, will house all ten current airport rental agencies with capacity for additional companies.[22] The complex wil feature 9,900 parking spaces split up between two four-story parking decks that together cover 2.8 million million square feet, a 137,000 customer service center, and a maintence center for vehicles, which will feature 140 gas pumps,and 30 bays for washing, each one equipped with a water recovery system.[23] The automated people mover, nicknamed the ATL Skytrain (using Mitsubishi Crystal Mover) will connect the facility to the airport and to the Gateway Center of the Georgia International Convention Center and the Hartsfield-Jackson Rental Car Center.[24] A four-lane roadway will also be built across Interstate 85 to connect the Hartsfield-Jackson Rental Car Center to the existing airport road network.[25]

Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr. International Terminal

In July 2003, current Atlanta mayor Shirley Franklin announced a new terminal to be named the Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr.. The new international terminal would be built on the east side of the airport near International Concourse E, on a site that has been occupied by air cargo facilities and the midfield control tower. It would add twelve new gates able to hold wide-body jets, as well as new check-in desks and a baggage claim area solely for international carriers. Additionally, the internatonal terminal would have its own parking lot just for international passengers with over 1,100 spots. Arriving international passengers whose final destination is Atlanta will be able to keep possession of their luggage as they proceed to exit the airport. The new terminal will be affixed to Terminal E by the people mover tram and will also have new ground transportation access from I-75.[26] It was slated to open in 2006. However, time and cost overruns led general manager Ben DeCosta to cancel the design contract in August 2005. The very next day the company sued the airport claiming "fraud" and "bad faith", blaming the airport authority for the problems.[27] Recently, Ben DeCosta awarded a new design contract on the new international terminal to Atlanta Gateway Designers (AGD). Current estimates place the terminal's cost at $1.4 billion with a projected delivery in 2011.[21][28]

Also scheduled to be completed after the new international terminal and concourse is a new terminal south of the current terminals. The new terminal is expected to include up to 70 gates.[29] The project is currently known as the South Gate Complex, and is estimated to cost around $1.8 billion. The new terminal will be connected to the main terminal by an expanded automated people mover system. [30]

Layout

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport has terminal and concourse space totaling 5.8 million square feet (~0.54 km²).[3] The airport has two terminals where passengers check in and claim bags, the North Terminal and the South Terminal. The two terminals are parts of a larger building. The portions of the building in between the two terminals include the Atrium (which has a large, open seating area, concessionaires and a bank), the main security checkpoint, car rental agencies and a MARTA (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority) train station.[31]

Six concourse buildings, parallel to one another, exist for passenger boarding. The first concourse is directly connected to the main terminal, and is known as the T-Gates (for Terminal). The remaining five concourses are arranged successively in distance from the terminal as Concourses A, B, C, D, and E.[3] Concourse E is the international terminal, and was opened in 1994 in time for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, which were held in Atlanta .[32] The concourses are connected by an underground Transportation Mall, which begins at the main terminal and passes under the center of each concourse.[33] There is also a second underground walkway between Concourses B and C located at the north end of the two concourses, making it possible to transfer without returning all the way to the center of the concourse. This was originally constructed for Eastern Airlines, who occupied these two terminals.

.]]

The Automated People Mover

In addition to a pedestrian walkway, which includes a series of moving walkways, connecting the concourses, the Transportation Mall also features an automated people mover. The Automated People Mover has a station at the east end of the main terminal for passengers entering the Transportation Mall after passing through security (this station also serves as the station for Concourse T), and a station at each of the remaining five concourses. There is an additional station for the Baggage Claim area, which is located directly underneath the Main Terminal. It is the world's busiest automated people mover, with over 64 million riders in 2002.[33]

MARTA Station

Hartsfield-Jackson also has its own train station on the city's rapid transit system, MARTA. The above-ground station is inside in the main building, between the north and south terminals on the west end. The Airport train station is currently the southernmost station in the MARTA system.[34]

Main Terminal and baggage claim

North Terminal

[[File:|thumb|right|A line of automated and staffed ticketing counters for Delta, Atlanta's major tenant airline.]]

South Terminal

Terminals, airlines, and destinations

The Atlanta airport has more nonstop flights and destinations than any airline hub in the world. It serves 261 nonstop destinations, including 83 international destinations in 54 countries, from 196 gates spread across six concourses: T, A, B, C, D, and E.

Concourse T

Concourse T (originally "T-Gates"; they are directly attached to the Terminal building) has 15 Gates: T1-T15 [36]

Airlines Destinations
American Airlines Chicago-O'Hare, Dallas/Fort Worth, Miami
AmericanConnection operated by Chautauqua Airlines St. Louis
American Eagle Chicago-O'Hare
Delta Air Lines Albuquerque, Anchorage [seasonal], Austin, Baltimore, Bermuda, Birmingham (AL), Boston, Bozeman [seasonal], Buffalo, Charleston (SC), Charlotte, Chicago-Midway, Chicago-O'Hare, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky, Cleveland, Colorado Springs, Columbus (OH), Dallas/Fort Worth, Dayton, Daytona Beach, Denver, Detroit, Eagle/Vail [seasonal], El Paso, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Greensboro, Gulfport/Biloxi, Hartford, Hayden/Steamboat Springs [seasonal], Houston-Intercontinental, Huntsville, Indianapolis, Jackson (MS), Jackson Hole [seasonal], Jacksonville (FL), Kalispell [seasonal], Kansas City, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Louisville, Melbourne (FL), Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Mobile, Montrose/Telluride [seasonal], Nashville, New Orleans, New York-JFK, New York-LaGuardia, Newark, Newport News, Norfolk, Oklahoma City, Ontario, Orange County, Orlando, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Portland (OR), Raleigh/Durham, Reno/Tahoe, Richmond, Rochester (NY), Sacramento, St. Louis, St. Thomas, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose (CA), San Juan (PR), Sarasota/Bradenton, Savannah, Seattle/Tacoma, Tallahassee, Tampa, Toronto-Pearson, Tucson, Vancouver [seasonal], Washington-Dulles, Washington-Reagan, West Palm Beach
United Airlines Chicago-O'Hare
United Express operated by Mesa Airlines Chicago-O'Hare, Washington-Dulles
United Express operated by Shuttle America Chicago-O'Hare, Denver, Washington-Dulles
Wings Air (USA) Athens, Lawrenceville, Rome (GA)

Concourse A

Concourse A has 34 Gates: A1-A34 [37]

Airlines Destinations
Delta Air Lines See Concourse T
Delta Connection operated by Shuttle America Charlotte, Chicago-Midway, Columbus (OH), Houston-Hobby, Indianapolis, Knoxville, Louisville, Memphis, Milwaukee, Nashville, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Sarasota, Washington-Reagan, White Plains

Concourse B

Concourse B has 35 Gates: B1-B34, B36 [38]

Airlines Destinations
Delta Air Lines See Concourse T
Delta Connection operated by Pinnacle Airlines Austin, Birmingham (AL), Charleston (SC), Charlotte, Cleveland, Dayton, Greenville/Spartanburg, Houston-Hobby, Houston-Intercontinental, Huntsville, Jackson (MS), Kansas City, Knoxville, Louisville, Memphis, Milwaukee, Norfolk, Pittsburgh, Richmond, San Antonio, Tallahassee, Washington-Reagan
Delta Connection operated by SkyWest Airlines Aspen [seasonal], Chicago-O'Hare, Columbus (OH), Colorado Springs, El Paso, Greenville/Spartanburg, Halifax [seasonal], Houston-Hobby, Houston-Intercontinental, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, St. Louis

Concourse C

Concourse C has 48 Gates: C1-C22, C30-C53, C55-C57. [39]

Concourse C is the primary hub for AirTran Airways and Atlantic Southeast Airlines

Note: AirTran flights to Cancún departs from Concourse C and arrives at Concourse E.

Airlines Destinations
AirTran Airways Akron/Canton, Atlantic City, Baltimore, Bloomington, Boston, Branson, Buffalo, Cancún, Charleston (SC), Charlotte, Chicago-Midway, Columbus (OH), Dallas/Fort Worth, Dayton, Denver, Detroit, Flint, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Harrisburg (seasonal), Houston-Hobby, Indianapolis, Jacksonville (FL), Kansas City, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Memphis, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Moline/Quad Cities, New Orleans, New York-LaGuardia, Newark, Newport News, Orlando, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Portland (ME) [seasonal], Raleigh/Durham, Richmond, Rochester (NY), St. Louis, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, San Juan, Sarasota/Bradenton, Seattle/Tacoma, Tampa, Washington-Dulles, Washington-Reagan, West Palm Beach, White Plains, Wichita
Delta Connection operated by Atlantic Southeast Airlines Akron/Canton, Albany (GA), Albany (NY), Alexandria, Allentown/Bethlehem, Appleton, Asheville, Augusta (GA), Austin, Baton Rouge, Birmingham (AL), Bloomington (IL), Blountville/Tri-Cities, Brunswick, Burlington (VT), Charleston (SC), Charleston (WV), Charlotte, Charlottesville, Chattanooga, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky, Cleveland, Columbia (SC), Columbus (GA), Columbus (MS), Dayton, Daytona Beach, Des Moines, Dothan, Evansville, Fayetteville (AR), Fayetteville (NC), Flint, Florence, Fort Myers, Fort Walton Beach, Fort Wayne, Freeport, Gainesville, Grand Rapids, Greensboro, Greenville/Spartanburg, Gulfport/Biloxi, Harrisburg, Houston-Hobby, Houston-Intercontinental, Huntsville, Indianapolis, Jackson (MS), Jacksonville (NC), Killeen, Key West, Knoxville, Lafayette, Lewisburg (WV), Lexington, Lincoln (NE), Little Rock, Lynchburg, Madison, Manchester (NH), Melbourne (FL), Meridian, Milwaukee, Mobile, Moline/Quad Cities, Monroe, Montgomery, Montréal-Trudeau, Myrtle Beach, Nassau, Nashville, New Bern, Newburgh, Newport News, Norfolk, North Eleuthera, Oklahoma City, Omaha, Panama City (FL), Pensacola, Peoria, Pittsburgh, Portland (ME), Providence, Raleigh/Durham, Richmond, Roanoke, Rochester (NY), St. Louis, San Antonio, Savannah, Shreveport, Sioux Falls, South Bend, Syracuse, Tallahassee, Toronto-Pearson,Tri-Cities TN/VA, Tulsa, Valdosta, White Plains, Wichita, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton [ends August 17], Wilmington (NC)

Concourse D

Concourse D has 37 Gates: Gate D1, D1A, D2-D8, D8A, D9-D11, D11A, D12-D16, D21-D37. [40]

Concourse D also holds the overflow gates that any airline may use. These gates are not held by any particular airline.

Airlines Destinations
Air Canada operated by Air Canada Jazz Toronto-Pearson
AirTran Airways See Concourse C [41]
Alaska Airlines Seattle/Tacoma [begins October 23][42]
Continental Airlines Houston-Intercontinental, Newark
Continental Express operated by ExpressJet Airlines Cleveland, Houston-Intercontinental, Newark
Delta Connection operated by Comair Austin, Birmingham (AL), Cedar Rapids/Iowa City, Cleveland [seasonal], Dayton, Greensboro, Harrisburg, Huntsville/Decatur, Lexington, Louisville, Manchester (NH), Nashville, Newark, Providence, Raleigh/Durham, Springfield (MO), Syracuse, Toronto-Pearson, Tulsa
Delta Connection operated by Mesaba Airlines Blountville/Tri-Cities, Chattanooga [ends August 31; resumes January 1], Columbus (GA) [begins August 18], Hilton Head, Muscle Shoals, Tallahassee [begins August 18], Tupelo
Frontier Airlines Denver
Midwest Airlines Milwaukee
Midwest Connect operated by Republic Airlines Milwaukee
Spirit Airlines Fort Lauderdale
US Airways Charlotte, Philadelphia, Phoenix
US Airways Express operated by Air Wisconsin Philadelphia
US Airways Express operated by Mesa Airlines Charlotte
US Airways Express operated by PSA Airlines Charlotte, Philadelphia
US Airways Express operated by Republic Airlines Charlotte

International Concourse E

International Concourse E has 28 Gates: E1-E12, E14-E18, E26-E36 [43]

Airlines Destinations
Air France Paris-Charles de Gaulle
British Airways London-Heathrow
Delta Air Lines Acapulco, Antigua, Aruba, Athens, Barbados, Barcelona, Belize City, Bonaire, Bogotá, Brasilia [begins December 17][44], Brussels, Buenos Aires-Ezeiza, Cancún, Cape Town [ends August 29], Caracas, Copenhagen, Cozumel, Curaçao [seasonal], Dakar [ends August 29], Dubai, Dublin, Düsseldorf, Fortaleza, Frankfurt, Grand Cayman, Guadalajara, Guatemala City, Guayaquil [seasonal], Johannesburg, Kingston, Lagos, Liberia (CR), Lima, London-Gatwick [resumes September 1], London-Heathrow, Madrid, Managua, Manaus, Manchester (UK), Mexico City, Milan-Malpensa, Montego Bay, Moscow-Sheremetyevo [seasonal], Mumbai [ends October 25][45], Munich, Nassau, Panama City, Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Port of Spain, Prague [seasonal], Providenciales, Puerto Plata, Puerto Vallarta, Punta Cana, Quito, Recife, Rio de Janeiro-Galeão, Roatán, Rome-Fiumicino [resumes September 1], St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Maarten, San José de Costa Rica, San José del Cabo, San Salvador, Santiago de Chile, Santiago de los Caballeros, Santo Domingo, São Paulo-Guarulhos, San Pedro Sula, Seoul-Incheon [ends August 30], Shanghai-Pudong [ends September 1], Stockholm-Arlanda [seasonal], Stuttgart, Tegucigalpa, Tel Aviv, Tobago, Tokyo-Narita [ends September 30], Venice-Marco Polo [seasonal], Zürich
Delta Connection operated by Pinnacle Airlines Belize City, Cozumel, Providenciales, St. Croix
Delta Connection operated by Shuttle America Guadalajara, Monterrey
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Amsterdam
Korean Air Seoul-Incheon
Lufthansa Frankfurt
Northwest Airlines Amsterdam, Honolulu, London-Gatwick [ends September 1], Rome-Fiumicino [ends September 1], Tokyo-Narita

Atlantic Aviation

Due to access restrictions, GeorgiaSkies currently operates from the Atlantic Aviation Fixed base operator facility and provides shuttle transportation for passengers connecting to the main passenger terminals.[46]

Cargo airlines

Accidents and incidents

Accidents en route

  • April 4, 1977 Southern Airways Flight 242 (Huntsville to Atlanta, crashed en route a few dozen miles from Atlanta Airport)
  • September 6, 1985 Midwest Express Airlines Flight 105 (Milwaukee to Atlanta, crashed on takeoff at the airport in Milwaukee, Wisconsin)
  • May 11, 1996 ValuJet Flight 592 (Miami to Atlanta, crashed en route from Miami International Airport in the Florida Everglades)
  • August 27, 2006 Comair Flight 191 operating as Delta Connection Flight 5191 (Lexington to Atlanta, crashed on takeoff at the Blue Grass Airport) 49 fatalities were reported. [47]

Incidents

  • On May 23, 1960 Delta Air Lines Flight 1903 assumed a nose high attitude shortly after take-off and then banked steeply to the left and crashed nose down killing 4.[48]
  • On June 8, 1995 ValuJet Flight 597 suffered a catastrophic engine failure on the runway.
  • On November 29, 2000 AirTran Airways Flight 956 executed an emergency landing shortly after takeoff, due to an electrical fire.
  • On January 12, 2007, a stowaway was found dead on board a Delta Air Lines jet in the wheel well after arriving in Atlanta from Dakar, Senegal.[49]
  • On January 11, 2008 an Atlantic Southeast Airlines Canadair CRJ-200 and a Delta Air Lines Boeing 757 came within 1,250 feet (380 m) of collision.[50]

Chemical spills

At the beginning of January 2002, the glycol solution used for deicing during winter weather operations overflowed from the glycol collection system into the drainage system that eventually flows into the Flint River. Because the airport is built over the beginning point of the Flint River, one of the major rivers in Georgia, it ended up in water systems which supply drinking water downstream. The problem was fixed before the next winter and as a result has not backed up into the drainage system again.

Security incidents

On November 16, 2001, a man left the secure area to retrieve his camera bag, which he had left behind, and then tried to bypass the wait at the security checkpoint by running the wrong way down the escalators at the secure area's exit. As a result, the entire airport was evacuated, including all aircraft, and operations halted for three hours.[51]

The man said that he tried to bypass the security line because he would be late for a flight he was taking to see a Georgia Bulldogs football game. As part of his sentence, he was not allowed to attend any Bulldogs games for the 2002 season.[52]

Crime

From December 2006 to March 2007, there were 30 arrests for indecent exposure involving reported sex acts in airport bathrooms.[53] Several prominent persons were arrested, including an advisor for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a Spelman College professor, and the Chairman of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority board of directors.[54]

Lightning strike

In 2009, a severe thunderstorm on the evening of April 23 caused a lightning strike directly to the control tower at 8:45 (22:45) EDT. The airport was already in a ground stop due to dangerous wind shear, and four minutes after the strike, the tower was evacuated after a smoke odor was detected. After returning at 9:10, a loss of mains electricity at 9:20 caused further problems, including major flight delays and diversions due also to the lightning (at over 1000 strikes per hour) and large amounts of hail that continued in the vicinity. Partial power outages continued to affect the airport and the northern runway lighting for more than an hour afterward, leaving only three other runways to handle the backlog. An FAA official said that neither the new nor the old tower had been struck in at least 18 years.[55]

Other notes

As a result of the Southeastern U.S. drought of 2007, the airport (the eighth-largest water user in the state) has made changes to reduce water usage. This includes adjusting toilets, of which there are 725 commodes and 338 urinals, in addition to 601 sinks. (The two terminals alone use 917,000 gallons or about 3.5 million liters each day in average.) It also suspended the practice of using firetrucks to spray water over aircraft when the pilot made a last landing before retirement (a water salute).[56][57] The city of Macon offered to sell water to the airport, through a proposed pipeline.[58]

Air traffic controllers for tower and ground control operations refer to the letter "D" using the word "Dixie" instead of "Delta" to avoid confusion with Delta Air Lines aircraft (note the use of "DIXIE" for taxiway "D" in the FAA's airport diagram, listed in the external links below).

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "Year-to-Date Passenger Data" (PDF). Department of Aviation, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. December 2007. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/docs/Traffic/200812.pdf. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  2. Tharpe, Jim (2007-01-04). "Atlanta airport still the "busiest": Hartsfield-Jackson nips Chicago's O'hare for second year in a row". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on 2007-01-06. http://web.archive.org/web/20070106042352/http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories/2007/01/04/0104airport.html. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Fact Sheet". City of Atlanta. February 2007. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/ATL_FactSheet.aspx. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  4. "Top 20 U.S. Gateways for Nonstop International Air Travel: 1990, 1995, and 2000". U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Archived from the original on 2007-06-05. http://web.archive.org/web/20070605110006/http://www.bts.gov/publications/us_international_travel_and_transportation_trends/html/table10.html. 
  5. http://apps.atlantaga.gov/citydir/dpcd/maps/zoning_sheet_14-128.pdf
  6. "City Maps." City of College Park. Retrieved on May 25, 2009.
  7. "Official Zoning Map." City of Hapeville. Retrieved on May 19, 2009.
  8. Garrett, Franklin, Atlanta and Its Environs, 1954, Vol.II, p.851
  9. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/Airport_History.aspx
  10. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/Airport_History.aspx
  11. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/Airport_History.aspx
  12. "Maynard Jackson Jr". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 2003-06-25. http://www.legacy.com/ATLANTA/Obituaries.asp?Page=LifeStory&PersonId=1113182. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  13. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/Airport/ATL/Airport_History.aspx
  14. "Atlanta International Airport: Fifth Runway". City of Atlanta. May 2006. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/5thMain.htm. 
  15. "Aviation "Bridges" the Gap for Future Growth". Williams-Russell and Johnson, Inc. http://www.wrjinc.com/index.php?pid=95. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  16. "Atlanta International Airport: Benchmark Results" (PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. 2004. http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ato/publications/bench/DOWNLOAD/pdf/ATL_2004.pdf. 
  17. David M. Halbfinger (2003-08-13). "Atlanta Is Divided Over Renaming Airport for Former Mayor". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/13/us/atlanta-is-divided-over-renaming-airport-for-former-mayor.html. Retrieved on 2009-06-19. 
  18. Airline Industry Information (2003-10-21). "Atlanta airport to be renamed Hartsfield-Jackson". AllBusiness.com. http://www.allbusiness.com/operations/shipping-air-freight/663285-1.html. Retrieved on 2009-06-19. 
  19. Tharpe, Jim (2007-03-18). "An end-around to efficiency: Hartsfield-Jackson strip offers safety, boosts capacity". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on 2007-03-22. http://web.archive.org/web/20070322165005/http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2007/03/18/0319metairport.html. 
  20. "Financial Statements June 30, 2007 and 2006" (PDF). City of Atlanta, Georgia Department of Aviation. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/pdfs/FY07DOAFinancials.pdf. 
  21. 21.0 21.1 Ramos, Rachel Tobin (2007-09-21). "Hartsfield project costs soar to $9B". Atlanta Business Chronicle. http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2007/09/24/story2.html. Retrieved on 2007-11-01. 
  22. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/RentalCarCenter/RentalCarCenter_FAQ.aspx
  23. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/RentalCarCenter/RentalCarCenter_FAQ.aspx
  24. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/RentalCarCenter/RentalCarCenter_FAQ.aspx
  25. "HJAIA - Airport Construction". City of Atlanta. http://atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/construction.htm. Retrieved on 2007-11-01. 
  26. "HJAIA - Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr. International Terminal". City of Atlanta. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/fifth/ceela.htm. Retrieved on 2007-11-01. 
  27. "City Sued Over Airport Terminal". 11Alive.com. 2005-08-17. http://www.11alive.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=67892. 
  28. Jim Tharpe (2008-02-27). "Passenger Perks the Buzz of Proposed International Terminal". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/business/stories/2008/02/27/airport_0228.html. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  29. "New Passenger Complex to Handle Growing Airport Needs". Hartsfield-Jackson News. December 2005. http://www.atlantaairportbusinessopportunities.com/hjn/2005/12/dvlp2.htm. 
  30. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/airport/frmAirportinformationConstruction_Maynard.aspx
  31. "2005 Annual Report" (PDF). City of Atlanta Department of Aviation. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/pdfs/2005%20Annual%20Report_Website.pdf. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  32. "Airport History". Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/airport_info/histpage.htm. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  33. 33.0 33.1 "Transportation Mall/People Mover". Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/sublevels/customer_service/mallpage.htm. Retrieved on 2007-07-06. 
  34. "Airport Station Helper". Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. http://www.itsmarta.com/explore/airporthelp.htm. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  35. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/passenger/pdf/mt_11_08.pdf
  36. "Concourse T Directory" (PDF). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/passenger/pdf/t.pdf. Retrieved on 2009-03-02. 
  37. "Concourse A Directory" (PDF). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/passenger/pdf/a.pdf. Retrieved on 2009-03-02. 
  38. "Concourse B Directory" (PDF). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/passenger/pdf/b.pdf. Retrieved on 2009-03-02. 
  39. "Concourse C Directory" (PDF). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/passenger/pdf/c.pdf. Retrieved on 2009-03-02. 
  40. "Concourse D Directory" (PDF). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/passenger/pdf/d.pdf. Retrieved on 2009-03-02. 
  41. http://www.airtran.com/cities/atlantaga.aspx
  42. http://www.ajc.com/services/content/business/delta/stories/2009/05/06/alaska_airlines_atlanta.html
  43. "Concourse E Directory" (PDF). Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. http://www.atlanta-airport.com/forms/passenger/pdf/e.pdf. Retrieved on 2009-03-02. 
  44. Delta Air Lines Announces New Flights between Atlanta and Brasilia, Brazil, Starting in December
  45. http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Delta-Global-Recession-Rising-prnews-15499621.html?.v=1
  46. "GeorgiaSkies - Atlanta, Georgia (ATL)". GeorgiaSkies. http://www.pacificwings.com/gsky/gs/airport-information.asp?sct=atlanta. Retrieved on 2009-03-02. 
  47. "Altered taxiway cited in crash that killed 49". International Herald Tribune. 2009-08-28. http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/08/28/news/crash.php. Retrieved on 2008-09-27. 
  48. "May 23, 1960.". Our Georgia History. http://ourgeorgiahistory.com/search?id=7126. Retrieved on 2008-09-26. 
  49. "Stowaway's Body Found In Delta Jet." CBS News.
  50. "FAA probes near-collision at Atlanta airport". Associated Press (MSNBC). 2008-01-12. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22624189/. Retrieved on 2008-04-07. 
  51. "Suspect in custody in Atlanta airport incident". CNN. 2001-11-16. http://archives.cnn.com/2001/US/11/16/rec.hartsfield.evacuation/index.html. Retrieved on 2007-08-02. 
  52. http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/03/06/national/main503151.shtml
  53. Shirek, Jon (2007-03-31). "Delta Employee Suspended for Sex Arrest". 11 Alive News. http://www.11alive.com/news/article_news.aspx?storyid=94543&provider=top. 
  54. Donsky, Paul (2007-03-15). "MARTA chairman won't resign: Ed Wall arrested for having sex in airport bathroom". Atlanta Journal Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2007/03/15/0315metwall.html?imw=Y. 
  55. http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/04/23/ga.airport.storms/
  56. "Airport Hoping to Flush Away Less Water". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 2007-10-29. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2007/10/28/airportdrought_1029.html. Retrieved on 2008-06-12. 
  57. "Fewer, Faster Flushes for Airport Toilets". WSB TV. 2007-10-29. http://www.wsbtv.com/drought/14448080/detail.html. Retrieved on 2008-06-13. 
  58. "Drought: Macon Offers Water to ATL Airport". Georgia Public Broadcasting News. 2007-10-24. http://gpbnews.blogspot.com/2007/10/drought-macon-offers-water-to-atl.html. Retrieved on 2008-06-13. 

External links

Template:Commonscat

Coordinates: 33°38′12″N 84°25′41″W / 33.63672°N 84.428066°W / 33.63672; -84.428066


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Hapeville article)

From Wikitravel

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

Hapeville is a city in Metro Atlanta. It is the location for the future "Aerotropolis", a mixed-use project to be built at the site of the former Ford Assembly Plant, inspired by the success of Atlantic Station. The Aerotropolis will be located convieniantly next to the Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, and is intended to be a shopping, dining, and entertainment area for long layovers, and include hotels, condominiums, and office space for business travelers.

  • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is the world's busiest airport, and is the largest hub for Delta, which has over 1,000 daily departures to points around the country and the world. AirTran Airways also operates a large domestic hub from Atlanta, with service to most major cities of the country, particularly in the eastern and midwestern US. The airport property is located partly in Hapeville, and partly within the city limits of College Park and Atlanta, as well as unincorporated areas of Fulton and Clayton County.
    • The Parking Spot [1] provides covered and uncovered parking near Hartsfield-Jackson Airport with two separate lots, The Parking Spot and The Parking Spot 2.
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