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Coordinates: 53°24′31″N 2°09′44″W / 53.4085°N -2.1622°E / 53.4085; -2.1622

The Hat Works
Hat Works.jpg
Hat Works, Stockport
Hat Works is located in Greater Manchester
Shown within Greater Manchester
Cotton
Former names Wellington Mill
Spinning Mill
Structural system Brick and cast iron fireproof mill
Thomas Marsland
Coordinates 53°24′31″N 2°09′44″W / 53.4085°N -2.1622°E / 53.4085; -2.1622
Construction
Built 1828
Renovated *1:Chimney 1860*2:*3:
Floor count 7
Design team
Awards and prizes and listings Grade II listed building

The Hat Works is a museum located in Stockport, Greater Manchester. The museum opened in 2000.[1] Prior to that, smaller displays of hatting equipment were exhibited firstly in Stockport Museum and then from 1993 in the former Battersby's hat factory.[2]

The building called Wellington Mill, was originally a cotton spinning mill[3] [4] built in 1830–1831 before becoming a hat works in the 1890s.[5] It is a Grade II listed building[4] and is situated on the A6 Wellington Road South, between the town centre and the railway station.

Contents

The mill building

Wellington Mill, was built in 1828 by Thomas Marsland to spin cotton, four years after the opening of the turnpike now known as Wellington Road South. It was one of the first fireproof mills. The mill was built with cast iron columns and brick vaults, which are filled with sand. The ceiling cavities were also filled with sand. There are 2 rows of 14 cast iron columns on each floor and cast iron roof trusses. Wellington Mill was seven stories tall and thus is one of the tallest mills in Stockport. The 200 feet (61 m) chimney was added in 1860. Ward Brothers, who were hatters, occupied part of the building from the 1890s to the 1930s.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Mad hatters win top award". Stockport Express. M.E.N. Media. 2002-10-02. http://www.stockportexpress.co.uk/news/s/309/309923_mad_hatters_win_top_award.html. Retrieved 2008-03-06.  
  2. ^ Williamson, Hannah (2006). "The Character of Hat Works". Manchester Region History Review 17 (2): 111–121.  
  3. ^ Greater Manchester Archaeological Contracts; Mark Fletcher and Koral Ahmet (1994). Wellington Mill, Stockport.. Greater Manchester Archaeological Contracts. pp. 1-38. http://www.spinningtheweb.org.uk/bookbrowse.php?page=21&book=Wellington&sub=nwcotton&theme=places&crumb=Stockport&size=800x1099. Retrieved 2010.  
  4. ^ a b A guide to the industrial archaeology of Greater Manchester. Association for Industrial Archaeology. 2000. ISBN 978-0-9528930-3-5. OCLC 45829134.  
  5. ^ "Spinning the Web > Home > Spinning the Web partners > Stockport Library and Information Service". Manchester City Council. http://www.spinningtheweb.org.uk/partners17.php. Retrieved 2008-03-06.  
  6. ^ The Hat Works, official site

External links

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