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He 64
Role Sports plane
National origin Germany
Manufacturer Heinkel
Designed by Siegfried and Walter Günter
First flight 1932
Number built 7

The Heinkel He 64 was a sports plane built in Germany in 1932 to participate in the touring plane championships that year. Designed by Siegfried and Walter Günter, it was a sleek, low-wing monoplane of conventional configuration with fixed, tailskid undercarriage. The pilot and passenger sat in tandem under a streamlined canopy. Six examples were entered in the championships, which represented almost every example of the type built, the only exception being the first prototype, which had crashed.

The He 64s shone in the speed-related trials, taking the first three places in the 7,363 km (4,601 mi) "Rally over Europe", and the first five places in the overall speed trials. Although no He 64 had placed in any of the other categories, these wins were sufficient to gain pilot Fritz Morzik an overall tied second place in the contest.

Specifications (He 64b)

General characteristics

  • Crew: One pilot
  • Capacity: 1 passenger
  • Length: 8.30 m (27 ft 3 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.80 m (32 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.10 m (6 ft 11 in)
  • Empty weight: 470 kg (1,040 lb)
  • Gross weight: 780 kg (1,720 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Argus As 8A, 110 kW (150 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 245 km/h (152 mph)
  • Range: 1,500 km (930 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 6,000 m (19,700 ft)

References

  • Heinze, Edwin P.A. "The New Heinkel He 64". Flight: 848-50, 9 September 1932. Retrieved: 24 April 2008.
  • Nowarra, Heinz. Die deutsche Luftrüstung 1933-1945. Bonn: Bernard and Graefe, 1983, pp. Teil 2, 173–175.
  • Taylor, Michael J.H. Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions, 1989, pp. 501. ISBN 0-51710-316-8.

External links

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