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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hello Kitty
Hello Kitty Appearance.JPG
Hello Kitty at a Sanrio Store appearance
Information
Species Cat
Gender Female


Hello Kitty (ハローキティ Harō Kiti ?)[1], is a fictional character produced by the Japanese company Sanrio, first designed by Ikuko Shimizu.[2] Her first appearance on an item, a vinyl coin purse, was introduced in Japan in 1974 and brought to the United States in 1976.[3][4]

The character is portrayed as a female white cat with a red bow and no drawn mouth. She lives in London, England with her parents and twin sister.

The Hello Kitty line has since developed licensing arrangements worth more than $1 billion a year in sales.[5] Examples of products depicting the character include dolls, stickers, greeting cards, clothes, accessories, school supplies, dishes and home appliances.[6 ] Hello Kitty has an official theme park, Sanrio Puroland, which opened in 1990.

Contents

In media

Television series

Hello Kitty
Hello Kitty Animation Theater screenshot.jpg
Hello Kitty in a kimono from Hello Kitty Animation Theater vol.1
ハローキティ
(Harō Kiti)
Genre Kodomo manga
TV anime
Hello Kitty's Furry Tale Theater
Studio United States DIC Entertainment
Japan Madhouse
English network United States ABC Family, Univision
Original run 19861986
Episodes 13
TV anime
Hello Kitty and Friends
Studio Japan Madhouse
Network Japan TV Tokyo
English network United States CBS, Toon Disney
Original run 19911992
Episodes 13
TV anime
Hello Kitty's Paradise
Studio Japan Madhouse
Licensor United States Saban Entertainment
Network Japan TV Tokyo
English network United States Toon Disney
Original run 19931994
Episodes 16
Anime and Manga Portal

The Japanese anime series Hello Kitty and Friends aired on TV Tokyo in Japan, and CBS in the United States in 1991. It also ran in reruns on Toon Disney. On the show, Kitty is a little girl living with her mother, father, and twin sister Mimmy, who is identical to Kitty but has different colored clothes and wears her bow under the opposite ear. 13 episodes were produced, using animation produced as early as 1991.

On Japanese television, Hello Kitty (and her pals) have starred in an anime series. Hello Kitty's Paradise ran for 16 episodes between 1993 and 1994. This version was released in English in 2000, and like "Hello Kitty and Friends". Hello Kitty and friends also appeared in Hello Kitty's Animation Theatre, which had Hello Kitty and other Sanrio characters appearing in their versions of different fairy tales. Available in the U.S. from ADV Films (who also own the video/DVD rights to Hello Kitty and Friends & Hello Kitty's Paradise)

Hello Kitty appeared in a new Japanese clay-animated series called Hello Kitty's Stump Village in 2005. At Anime Expo 2006, Geneon Universal Entertainment announced that Hello Kitty's Stump Village was one of the series it licensed for U.S. release. Volume 1 was released in October, and Volume 2 was released in January and in 2008. After Geneon withdrew from the US market at the end of 2007, it was later re-licensed by Funimation Entertainment, who will continue to release it in North America. Hello Kitty appeared for the first time in a full 3D animation The Adventures of Hello Kitty & Friends developed by Sanrio's digital entertainment entity Sanrio Digital.

By 1996, Hello Kitty had already grossed over 20 million dollars throughout Japan. As time progressed, many more Japanese artists exploited this arsenal of business by creating a second second type of Hello Kitty featured in Clay. This version was released in English in 2000, and like many episodes in "Hello Kitty and Friends". Hello Kitty and friends also appeared in Hello Kitty's Animation Theatre, which had Hello Kitty buying other Sanrio characters appearing in their versions of different fairy tales. Over all, the Hello Kitty franchise has influenced many individuals to make similar productions.

Video games

Numerous Hello Kitty games have been produced since the release of the first title for NES in 1992; however, the majority of these games haven't seen a release outside of Japan. Hello Kitty also has made cameo appearances in games featuring other Sanrio characters, such as the Keroppi game, Kero Kero Keroppi no Bōken Nikki: Nemureru Mori no Keroleen. Special edition consoles such as the Hello Kitty Dreamcast, Hello Kitty Game Boy Pocket, and Hello Kitty Crystal Edition Xbox have also been released exclusively in Japan. Hello Kitty is a very popular figure all around the world nowadays. It is highly recognisable and is featured everywhere. Its friends and it are a huge part of the toy industry selling many different articles such as clothing, toys, stationary etc.

Examples of Hello Kitty games include:

Products

Sanrio Shop in Madrid, Spain
The Hello Kitty Airbus A330-200

Hello Kitty can be found on a variety of consumer products ranging from school supplies to fashion accessories. In Japan, Hello Kitty products is the theme of local tourist attractions.

Hello Kitty has her own branded album, Hello World, featuring Hello Kitty-inspired songs performed by a collection of artists, including Keke Palmer and Cori Yarckin. Sanrio and Fender released a series of Hello Kitty guitars (the Hello Kitty Stratocaster), and even a jet airplane (the Hello Kitty Jet).

In Asia, they released limited-edition Hello Kitty credit cards.

In 2009, Make-up Art Cosmetics (MAC) approached Sanrio to produce a limited-edition Hello Kitty makeup collection, which have now become expensive collector's items.

Establishments

There is a themed restaurant named Hello Kitty Sweets in Taipei, Taiwan. The restaurant's decor and many of its dishes are visually patterned after the Hello Kitty character.[10][11]

In 2008, a Hello Kitty-themed maternity hospital opened in Yuanlin, Taiwan. Hello Kitty is featured on the receiving blankets, room decor, bed linens, birth certificate covers, and nurses' uniforms. The hospital's owner explained that he hoped that the theming would help ease the stress of childbirth.[12][13]

Reception

UNICEF awarded Hello Kitty the exclusive title of UNICEF Special Friend of Children.[14][15]

The brand rose to greater prominence during the late 1990s when several celebrities such as Mariah Carey adopted Hello Kitty as a fashion statement.[16] New products featuring the character can be found in many American department stores.

Since 2004, Hello Kitty has been featured on a MasterCard debit card from Legend Credit Inc. The card was released to teach young girls how to shop and use a debit card.[17]

In May 2008, Japan named Hello Kitty the ambassador of Japanese tourism in China and Hong Kong, two places where the character is exceptionally popular among children and young women. This marked the first time Japan's tourism ministry had appointed a fictional character to the role.[18]

Cultural references

In 1999, in Hong Kong, a brutal murder known as the Hello Kitty murder took place. The popular name of the case derives from the fact that the murderer inserted his victim's head into a Hello Kitty doll after decapitating her.

As of August 2007, Thai police officers who have committed minor transgressions such as showing up late or parking in the wrong place are forced to wear Hello Kitty armbands for several days as penance.[19]

On the episode "Stocks" of the television sitcom NewsRadio, Matthew gives Bill a backpack with Hello Kitty on it when he returns from a trip to Japan.

In the Homestar Runner Halloween cartoon "Most in the Graveyard" The King of Town dresses up as Hello Kitty for Halloween.

The video game Hello Kitty: Island Adventure is referenced in the South Park episode "Make Love, Not Warcraft".

Also in CNET's podcast Gadgettes there is a segment called "Hello Kitty Watch" dedicated to Hello Kitty-inspired things, mainly gadgets.

References

  1. ^ "サンリオキャラクターたちの本名、言えますか?" (in Japanese). 2008-07-11. http://www.excite.co.jp/News/bit/E1215736595745.html. Retrieved 2008-07-11.  
  2. ^ Takagi, Jun (August 21, 2008). "10 Questions for Yuko Yamaguchi". TIME Magazine. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1834451,00.html. Retrieved 2009-10-31.  
  3. ^ Dhamija, Tina (April 1, 2003). "Designing an Icon: Hello Kitty Transcends Generational and Cultural Limits". ToyDirectory. http://www.toydirectory.com/MONTHLY/Apr2003/designinspiration.asp. Retrieved 2008-12-28.  
  4. ^ "Hello Kitty celebrates 30". China News Daily. 2005-08-19. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-08/19/content_470573.htm. Retrieved 2008-12-28.  
  5. ^ Segers, Rien T. (2008). A New Japan for the Twenty-First Century. Routledge. pp. 127. ISBN 9780415453110. http://books.google.com/books?id=03SAVAaiwn4C&pg=PA127&dq=sanrio+%22hello+kitty%22+sales+billion&lr=&client=firefox-a&sig=ACfU3U1EB9MVsmtjEFnpnL6n3XlHtxHm0w.  
  6. ^ Paschal (2003-05-18). "Sanrio's Hula Kitty heads to the beach". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. http://starbulletin.com/2003/05/18/business/story3.html. Retrieved 1998-08-21.  
  7. ^ "Hello Kitty's Big Fun Piano". MobyGames. http://www.mobygames.com/game/hello-kittys-big-fun-piano. Retrieved 2008-12-28.  
  8. ^ "Hello Kitty: Big City Dreams". IGN. http://uk.ds.ign.com/objects/142/14250212.html. Retrieved 2008-12-28.  
  9. ^ "Hello Kitty Parachute Paradise". ZIO Interactive. http://hellokittyparachuteparadise.sanriotown.com.  
  10. ^ Catherine Shu (March 27, 2009). "RESTAURANTS : Hello Kitty Sweets". http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2009/03/27/2003439508. Retrieved 2009-10-17.  
  11. ^ "Hello Kitty Sweets resto in Taipei (Part I)". April 30, 2008. http://lunchmaniac.blogspot.com/2008/04/hello-kitty-sweets-resto-in-taipei-part.html. Retrieved 2008-12-28.  
  12. ^ "Hello baby! Hello Kitty welcomes Taiwan newborns". Reuters. December 5, 2008. http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssLeisureProducts/idUSTP33674020081205. Retrieved 2008-12-09.  
  13. ^ "Taiwan hospital a hit with Hello Kitty fans". January 21, 2009. http://www.smh.com.au/world/strangebuttrue/taiwan-hospital-a-hit-with-hello-kitty-fans-20090122-7n8u.html. Retrieved 2009-03-06.  
  14. ^ "UNICEF Special Friend of Children". Sanrio. March 23, 2007. http://blog.sanriotown.com/kt_world:hellokitty.com/2007/03/23/unicef-special-friend-of-children/. Retrieved 2008-10-01.  
  15. ^ "Hello Kitty marks 30th birthday". The Japan Times Online. June 10, 2004. http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20040610b6.html. Retrieved 2008-10-01.  
  16. ^ Walker, Esther (21 May 2008). "Top cat: how 'Hello Kitty' conquered the world". The Independent. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/top-cat-how-hello-kitty-conquered-the-world-831522.html. Retrieved 2008-09-19.  
  17. ^ Mayer, Caroline E. (October 3, 2004). "Girls Go From Hello Kitty To Hello Debit Card". The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A2959-2004Oct2.html. Retrieved 2008-10-01.  
  18. ^ "Hello Kitty named Japan tourism ambassador". MSNBC. May 19, 2008. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24708771/. Retrieved 2008-10-01.  
  19. ^ BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | Thai cops punished by Hello Kitty

External links


Template:Safesubst:
Sanrio character
First appearance

1975
Last appearance

Ongoing
Created by

Yuko Shimizu
Template:Safesubst:
Nickname(s) Kitty White
Gender Female
Nationality Japanese (original designer)

Hello Kitty (ハローキティ Harō Kiti?)[1] is a fictional character produced by the Japanese company Sanrio, first designed by Yuko Shimizu. The character is a staple of the kawaii segment of Japanese popular culture.[2] The character is portrayed as a female white Japanese bobtail cat with a red bow. The character's first appearance on an item, a vinyl coin purse, was introduced in Japan in 1975 and brought to the United States in 1976.[3][4] This debut came under the Sanrio company lineup, where her various products are still developed and sold.

The Hello Kitty trademark has since spread globally and developed licensing arrangements worth more than $1 billion annually.[5] Examples of products depicting the character include dolls, stickers, greeting cards, clothes, accessories, school supplies, dishes and home appliances.[6] Her fame as a recurring Sanrio character has led to the creation of two officially licensed Hello Kitty theme parks, Harmonyland and the indoor Sanrio Puroland.

Contents

Character design

A spokesperson for Sanrio says that Hello Kitty is not normally given a mouth because "without the mouth, it is easier for the person looking at Hello Kitty to project their feelings onto the character" and that "the person can be happy or sad together with Hello Kitty."[7]

Products

Template:Safesubst:
File:Hello Kitty Animation Theater
Hello Kitty in a kimono from Hello Kitty Animation Theater vol.1
ハローキティ
(Harō Kiti)
GenreKodomo manga
Anime and Manga Portal
File:EVA
The Hello Kitty Airbus A330-200

Hello Kitty can be found on a variety of consumer products ranging from school supplies to fashion accessories. These products range from everyday items such to rare collectibles.

Financial products

As of 2010, Bank of America began offering Hello Kitty-themed checking accounts, where the account holder can get cheques and a Visa debit card with Kitty's face on it.[8] MasterCard debit cards have featured Hello Kitty as a design since 2004.[9]

High end products

Sanrio and Fender released a series of Hello Kitty guitars (the Hello Kitty Stratocaster), and even a jet airplane (the Hello Kitty Jet).

2009 marked the collaboration between apparel and accessory brand Stussy and Hello Kitty. Stussy worked with Hello Kitty on collection focusing on the Hello Kitty character with Stussy signature graphics. This collection included T-shirts, keychains, and hoodies.

In 2010, Hello Kitty entered the wine market with collection made up of four wines available for purchase online, continuing an expansion of products targeted at older audiences.[10]

Music

Hello Kitty has her own branded album, Hello World, featuring Hello Kitty-inspired songs performed by a collection of artists, including Keke Palmer and Cori Yarckin.[citation needed]

Hello Kitty was also chosen by AH-Software to become a Vocaloid. The choice was owed to the fact it was their 50th year anniversary.[11]

Video games

Numerous Hello Kitty games have been produced since the release of the first title for NES in 1992; however, the majority of these games were never released outside of Japan. Hello Kitty also has made cameo appearances in games featuring other Sanrio characters, such as the Keroppi game, Kero Kero Keroppi no Bōken Nikki: Nemureru Mori no Keroleen. Special edition consoles such as the Hello Kitty Dreamcast, Hello Kitty Game Boy Pocket, and Hello Kitty Crystal Edition Xbox have also been released exclusively in Japan.

Partial list of Hello Kitty video games

Establishments

There is a themed restaurant named Hello Kitty Sweets in Taipei, Taiwan. The restaurant's decor and many of its dishes are patterned after the Hello Kitty character.[15][16]

In 2008, a Hello Kitty-themed maternity hospital opened in Yuanlin, Taiwan. Hello Kitty is featured on the receiving blankets, room decor, bed linens, birth certificate covers, and nurses' uniforms. The hospital's owner explained that he hoped that the theme would help ease the stress of childbirth.[17][18]

Reception

The Hello Kitty brand rose to greater prominence during the late 1990s. At that time, several celebrities, such as Mariah Carey, had adopted Hello Kitty as a fashion statement.[19] Newer products featuring the character can be found in a large variety of American department stores.

In 2004, a Japanese blogger started a discussion on whether Hello Kitty was modeled after Musti, a cartoon character created by Flemish graphic artist Ray Goossens in 1945.[20]

The Dutch artist Dick Bruna, creator of Miffy, has suggested that Hello Kitty is a copy of Miffy, being rendered in a similar style, stating disapprovingly in an interview for the British paper The Daily Telegraph:

'That,' he says darkly, 'is a copy [of Miffy], I think. I don't like that at all. I always think, "No, don't do that. Try to make something that you think of yourself.[21]

In May 2008, Japan named Hello Kitty the ambassador of Japanese tourism in both China and Hong Kong, which are two places where the character is exceptionally popular among children and young women. This marked the first time Japan's tourism ministry had appointed a fictional character to the role.[22]

UNICEF has also awarded Hello Kitty the exclusive title of UNICEF Special Friend of Children.[23][24]

Hello Kitty's popularity has been waning in Japan for over a decade. In 2002, Hello Kitty lost her place as the top-grossing character in Japan in the Character Databank popularity chart and has never recovered. In the most recent survey, she is in third place behind Anpanman and Pikachu from Pokémon.[25]

Cultural references

In 1999, in Hong Kong, a brutal murder known as the Hello Kitty murder took place. The popular name of the case derives from the fact that the murderer inserted his victim's head into a Hello Kitty doll after decapitating her.[26]

In an episode of The Simpsons entitled "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo", the Simpson family travels to Japan where Lisa Simpson sees out of the hotel window looking at the Hello Kitty merchandise factory, where the cats are heard screaming as they are being incinerated.

As of August 2007, Thai police officers who have committed minor transgressions such as showing up late or parking in the wrong place are forced to wear pink Hello Kitty armbands for several days as penance.[27]

During the financial crisis of 2007–2010, a poster of a Hello Kitty pre-paid debit card expanded to roughly 1 meter in length was displayed on the floor of the US Senate by Senator Byron Dorgan as a demonstration of extreme methods used by credit companies to attract "children 10 to 14 years of age". Though not an actual credit card, it was criticized for its promotional website encouraging users to "shop 'til you drop."[28][29]

See also

Japan portal


References

  1. ^ "サンリオキャラクターたちの本名、言えますか?" (in Japanese). 2008-07-11. http://www.excite.co.jp/News/bit/E1215736595745.html. Retrieved 2008-07-11. 
  2. ^ Takagi, Jun (August 21, 2008). "10 Questions for Yuko Yamaguchi". TIME Magazine. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1834451,00.html. Retrieved 2009-10-31. 
  3. ^ Dhamija, Tina (April 1, 2003). "Designing an Icon: Hello Kitty Transcends Generational and Cultural Limits". ToyDirectory. http://www.toydirectory.com/MONTHLY/Apr2003/designinspiration.asp. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  4. ^ "Hello Kitty celebrates 30". China News Daily. 2005-08-19. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-08/19/content_470573.htm. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  5. ^ Segers, Rien T. (2008). A New Japan for the Twenty-First Century. Routledge. pp. 127. ISBN 9780415453110. http://books.google.com/books?id=03SAVAaiwn4C&pg=PA127&dq=sanrio+%22hello+kitty%22+sales+billion&lr=&client=firefox-a&sig=ACfU3U1EB9MVsmtjEFnpnL6n3XlHtxHm0w. 
  6. ^ Paschal (2003-05-18). "Sanrio's Hula Kitty heads to the beach". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. http://starbulletin.com/2003/05/18/business/story3.html. Retrieved 1998-08-21. 
  7. ^ Walker, Rob. Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are. Random House, Inc., 2008. 18. Retrieved from Google Books on August 30, 2010. ISBN 1400063914, 9781400063918.
  8. ^ ""Bank of America's "My Expression Banking" page with the Hello Kitty theme". https://www.bankofamerica.com/myexpression_banking/productInfo.do?affinity=22755&segmentid=SPIN. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  9. ^ Mayer, Caroline E. (October 3, 2004). "Girls Go From Hello Kitty To Hello Debit Card". The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A2959-2004Oct2.html. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  10. ^ Garcia, Catherine (March 26, 2010). "Please pass the bubbly, Hello Kitty". EW.com. http://popwatch.ew.com/2010/03/26/please-pass-the-bubbly-hello-kitty/. 
  11. ^ Fujimoto, Ken (August 16, 2010). "ハローキティといっしょ!×VOCALOID2って何だ!? [Hello Kitty Together with Vocaloid 2; What the!?]" (in Japanese). Livedoor. http://dtm.newsblog.jp/archives/51468636.html. Retrieved August 20, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Hello Kitty's Big Fun Piano". MobyGames. http://www.mobygames.com/game/hello-kittys-big-fun-piano. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  13. ^ "Hello Kitty: Big City Dreams". IGN. http://uk.ds.ign.com/objects/142/14250212.html. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  14. ^ "Hello Kitty Parachute Paradise". ZIO Interactive. http://hellokittyparachuteparadise.sanriotown.com. 
  15. ^ Catherine Shu (March 27, 2009). "RESTAURANTS : Hello Kitty Sweets". http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2009/03/27/2003439508. Retrieved 2009-10-17. 
  16. ^ "Hello Kitty Sweets resto in Taipei (Part I)". April 30, 2008. http://lunchmaniac.blogspot.com/2008/04/hello-kitty-sweets-resto-in-taipei-part.html. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  17. ^ "Hello baby! Hello Kitty welcomes Taiwan newborns". Reuters. December 5, 2008. http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssLeisureProducts/idUSTP33674020081205. Retrieved 2008-12-09. 
  18. ^ "Taiwan hospital a hit with Hello Kitty fans". The Sydney Morning Herald. January 21, 2009. http://www.smh.com.au/world/strangebuttrue/taiwan-hospital-a-hit-with-hello-kitty-fans-20090122-7n8u.html. Retrieved 2009-03-06. 
  19. ^ Walker, Esther (21 May 2008). "Top cat: how 'Hello Kitty' conquered the world". London: The Independent. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/top-cat-how-hello-kitty-conquered-the-world-831522.html. Retrieved 2008-09-19. 
  20. ^ [1]
  21. ^ Daily Telegraph, 31 July 2008, Dick Bruna, creator of the Miffy books, talks about his life and work
  22. ^ "Hello Kitty named Japan tourism ambassador". MSNBC. May 19, 2008. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24708771/. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  23. ^ "UNICEF Special Friend of Children". Sanrio. March 23, 2007. http://blog.sanriotown.com/kt_world:hellokitty.com/2007/03/23/unicef-special-friend-of-children/. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  24. ^ "Hello Kitty marks 30th birthday". The Japan Times Online. June 10, 2004. http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20040610b6.html. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  25. ^ Tabuchi, Hiroko (May 14, 2010). "In Search of Adorable, as Hello Kitty Gets Closer to Goodbye". NYTimes.com. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/15/business/global/15kitty.html?src=me&ref=business. 
  26. ^ People.com.cn. "People.com.cn." 妙齡女郎慘遭殘酷碎尸 三名疑犯陸續落網. Retrieved on 2008-02-24.
  27. ^ "Thai cops punished by Hello Kitty". BBC News. 2007-08-06. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6932801.stm. Retrieved 2010-05-04. 
  28. ^ "Credit card reform bill: Bye-bye to Hello Kitty?". http://blogs.consumerreports.org/money/2009/05/credit-card-reform-bill-teenagers-teens-teen-hello-kitty-obama-children-prepaid-marketing-fees.html. Retrieved 2010-05-02. 
  29. ^ "Hello Kitty - Tienda Hello Kitty". http://www.mihellokitty.com. Retrieved 2010-05-10. 

External links


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Hello Kitty

Developer(s) Sanrio Digital/Typhoon Games
Publisher(s) GOGAME
Status Open Beta
Release date July 1, 2009 (Indonesia)
Genre Fantasy MMORPG
Mode(s) Multiplayer, Online
Age rating(s)  ? Probably for pretty much every age
Platform(s) Windows
Media 1 DVD, download
Input Keyboard, mouse
System requirements Windows
* Intel Pentium 4 or equivalent
* 512 MB or more (1GB Recommended)
* Display card with support for Direct X 8.0 or higher
* Any sound card with support for DirectSound
* 3 GB free Hard disk drive space
* 4× DVD-ROM drive
* 56 kbit/s or faster Internet connection
Credits | Soundtrack | Codes | Walkthrough


Hello Kitty Online has a separate wiki that can be found here.


This article uses material from the "Hello Kitty" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English


Hello Kitty is a Japanese character of a cat made in 1974 by a Japanese design company named Sanrio. The character has a large head with, usually, a red bow between her ears with no mouth. Sanrio said that she was not given a mouth because she speaks from the heart instead of speaking one particular language. Hello Kitty is known all over the world.

Hello Kitty became very popular with young school-girls during the 1980s. In the 1990s the firm made more products with the picture of the cat which would appeal to teenagers and young women. During the later part of the first decade of the 21st century, Hello Kitty began targeting boys and young men with Hello Kitty for Boys. The character uses darker colours and a dark bow when it is targeted to males.

Hello Kitty has become very successful. The character's picture is on over fifty thousand products sold in 60 countries. Sanrio’s theme park Puroland opened in 1990. It is visited by more than 1.5 million visitors each year. Hello Kitty has been an animated character, such as in Hello Kitty’s Furry Tale Theatre, shown on United States television during 1987 and 1991.

Famous stars such as Mariah Carey and Britney Spears were photographed with products which had her picture. Hello Kitty is an example of a Japanese kawaii (cute in English) character.

References

Other pages

Other websites








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