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On November 27, 2006,[1] The Hellraiser Films And Their Legacy was released. The non-fiction book chronicled the production of the eight films, their spin-offs, and the franchise's legacy in popular culture.[2]

Hellraiser is a British horror franchise that consists of eight films, a series of comic books, as well as merchandise based on the series. The franchise is based on the novella The Hellbound Heart by Clive Barker, who would go on to write and direct the adaptation of his story, titled Hellraiser. The films, as well as the comic book series, continually features the Cenobite Pinhead. The series’ storyline focuses on a puzzle box that opens a gateway to another dimension, where the Cenobites come forth to take whomever opened the box back to their world, delivering an eternity of torture. Although Clive Barker wrote the original story, as well as wrote and directed the first film, he has not written or directed any of the succeeding sequels. Barker stated in an appearance on Loveline that he signed away the story and character rights to the production company before the first film, not realizing what a great success it would be. [3]

Contents

Films

Overview

In the original Hellraiser (1987), Frank Cotton (Sean Chapman) escapes from the Cenobites, who take pleasure in torturing him in an endless living Hell, when his brother Larry (Andrew Robinson) spills his own blood on the spot where Frank died opening a puzzle box that opened a gateway to the Cenobites. With the help of Larry's wife Julia (Clare Higgins), Frank begins regenerating his body with the blood of victims that Julia supplies him. Larry's daughter, Kirsty (Ashley Laurence), accidentally unleashes the Cenobites, but makes a deal to deliver Frank to them in exchange for her own life. After taking Frank, the Cenobites go back on their deal and try and take Kirsty as well. Solving the puzzle box, Kirsty sends the Cenobites back to Hell.[4]

In 1988, a sequel titled Hellbound: Hellraiser II follows Dr. Philip Channard (Kenneth Cranham) as he resurrects Julia, who was stuck in Hell with the Cenobites. Kirsty is pulled back into the Cenobite world, where the demons decide to keep her, but, having discovered the human identity of the Cenobites early, Kirsty appeals to their latent humanity, specifically the Cenobite leader Pinhead (Doug Bradley). Pinhead decides to release her, but he and his followers are killed by Channard, who has become a Cenobite himself. With help of a teenage girl, Tiffany (Imogen Boorman), who unknowingly assisted Channard in opening the box, Kirsty and Tiffany escape the Cenobite world and close the gateway behind them.[5]

In Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth (1992), the Cenobite Pinhead is trapped, along with the puzzle box, in the surface of an intricately carved pillar. The pillar is found by a night club owner, J.P. Monroe (Kevin Bernhardt), who begins assisting Pinhead in his resurrection. A television reporter, Joey Summerskill (Terry Farrell), begins to learn about Pinhead and the puzzle box, which leads her to Monroe's night club. Pinhead is eventually resurrected, and begins creating new Cenobite followers in an effort to establish Hell on Earth. Joey is able to use the puzzle box to send Pinhead back to his dimension; afterward, Joey submerges the box into freshly laid cement at a construction site.[6]

Hellraiser: Bloodline (1996) tells the story of the creator of the puzzle box, referred to as the Lament Configuration. A toymaker named Philip Lemarchand (Bruce Ramsay), commissioned by a Duc de L'Isle (Mickey Cottrell), a wealthy Aristocrat and master of the dark arts who wishes to open a gateway to Hell in order to enslave a demon. Beginning in the distant future, and tracing the history of the box from its creation in 1784, Bloodline shows how the Lemarchand family attempts to close the box forever after learning what L'Isle uses it for. Eventually, Dr. Paul Merchant creates the Elysium Configuration, a space station capable of closing the gateway for good, and he traps Pinhead inside and destroys him and the box.[7]

Hellraiser: Inferno (2000), the first of the succeeding sequels to be direct-to-video, follows Detective Joseph Thorne (Craig Sheffer) as he discovers the puzzle box while investigating a series of ritualistic murders. As time goes on he begins to uncover clues that suggest that he is the killer. Eventually, Pinhead shows up and informs Thorne that he is in his own personal hell, and will be reliving the same series of events for eternity.[8]

In Hellraiser: Hellseeker, Ashley Laurence returns to play Kirsty Cotton. In the 2002 film, Kirsty is married to Trevor (Dean Winters) when the two end up in a car accident that kills Kirsty. One month later, Trevor wakes up in a hospital and realizes that his wife is missing, but because of a head injury, his memory is uncertain and he cannot distinguish between fantasy and reality. Trevor finds himself the prime suspect in a murder case. Pinhead appears in the end, and informs Trevor that he was the one that died in the car crash, a sacrifice of Kirsty's, who had opened the puzzle box again.[9]

In Hellraiser: Deader (2005), reporter Amy Klein (Kari Wuhrer) is sent to Bucharest to investigate an underground suicide cult founded by a descendant of Philip Lemarchand, who claims to be able to bring back the dead. She is gradually drawn into their world and eventually sees no way out other than to join them. Pinhead and the Cenobites appear and kill everyone for attempting to invade their world. In order to prevent Pinhead from taking her soul, Amy kills herself.[10]

Hellraiser: Hellworld (2005) opens with five friends attending the funeral of a friend who died because of his obsession with the game "Hellworld". Two years later, the same five friends each complete the Lament Configuration on a website, earning an invitation to the "Hellworld" party at the Leviathan House. At the house, the host of the party (Lance Henriksen) takes them on a tour of the many layers of the home, and then drugs them with a psychedelic drug and buries them each in a coffin because he feels they were responsible for the death of his son earlier in the film. The police rescue the surviving teenagers, Chelsea (Katheryn Winnick) and Jake (Christopher Jacot), and the host is killed by Pinhead and the other Cenobites when he opens a puzzle box his son created.[11]

Crew

List indicator(s)

  • A dark grey cell indicates the information isn't available for the film.
Film Director Writer(s) Producer(s)
1. Hellraiser Clive Barker Christopher Figg
2. Hellbound Tony Randel Peter Atkins
3. Hell on Earth Anthony Hickox Christopher Figg & Lawrence Mortorff
4. Bloodline Kevin Yagher / Alan Smithee Nancy Rae Stone
5. Inferno Scott Derrickson Paul Harris Boardman & Scott Derrickson
6. Hellseeker Rick Bota Carl Dupre & Tim Day Mike Leahy & Ron Schmidt
7. Deader Neal Marshall Stevens & Tim Day David Greathouse & Ron Schmidt
8. Hellworld Carl Dupre Ron Schmidt

Box office

When comparing the Hellraiser film series with the other top-grossing horror franchises—A Nightmare on Elm Street, Child's Play, Friday the 13th, Halloween, Saw, Scream, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre—and adjusting for the 2008 inflation,[12] Hellraiser is the lowest grossing horror franchise in the United States, at approximately $84 million.[13] The Hellraiser series is surpassed by Friday the 13th, which tops the list at $614 million.[14] The Hannibal Lecter film series follows closely with $573 million,[15] A Nightmare on Elm Street with $522 million,[16] Halloween with $517 million,[17] Scream with $400 million,[18] Saw with $378 million,[19] Psycho with $371 million,[20] The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with $315 million,[21] and the Child's Play film series rounding out the list with approximately $200 million.[22] It should be noted that only four of the eight Hellraiser films were released theatrically, with the remaining sequels going direct-to-video.

List indicator(s)

  • A dark grey cell indicates the information isn't available for the film.


Film Release date Budget Box office revenue Reference
1. Hellraiser September 18, 1987 $14,564,027 [23]
2. Hellbound: Hellraiser II December 23, 1988 $12,090,735 [24]
3. Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth September 11, 1992 $12,534,961 [25]
4. Hellraiser: Bloodline March 8, 1996 $9,336,886 [26]
5. Hellraiser: Inferno
6. Hellraiser: Hellseeker
7. Hellraiser: Deader
8. Hellraiser: Hellworld
Hellraiser film series $48,526,609

Future

Dimension Films is working to develop a remake of the original Hellraiser. Clive Barker had turned in a 45-page treatment which outlined a film that was filled with "horror and drama".[27] Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo, the directors of the French horror film Inside, were supposed to write and direct the Hellraiser remake, with Barker backing the pair 100 percent. However, their Barker-supported script was rejected by Dimension and they were replaced with the writers of Feast and Saw IV. The directors cited creative differences when they left the project.[28]

French filmmaker Pascal Laugier has since been attached to the new Hellraiser film which will be a reboot, and not a remake. It will mix elements from both the first film and Clive Barker's original novella, The Hellbound Heart.[29] Laugier has said "I won't betray Clive Barker's work. I want to do a fresh film filled with a lot of unexpected and surprising things. At the same time, I want it to be connected to the real, original material." Laugier further added "We'll get the chance to have much more money than even Clive had in the first film, so it will be of course more epic, it will be bigger, and I hope that it won't be softer." [30] Clive Barker's response to Laugier's involvement has been positive. "I liked Martyrs a lot," Barker commented "I'm very excited at the idea of [Laugier] doing it. Pascal is a very talented filmmaker, obviously a lot more talented than I was when I stepped onto the sound stage on [the first] Hellraiser and I hadn't really directed anything before… I am completely open and ready to be blown away. I don't have any possessiveness about it. I just want people to have fun." [31] Variety has reported that the upcoming remake will be filmed in 3D.[32]

Literature

Novels

An anthology book consisting of twenty-one stories and entitled Hellbound Hearts was released on September 29, 2009.[33]

Comic books

In 1989, following the success of the Hellraiser and Hellbound: Hellraiser II, Epic Comics began publishing series of comic book spin-offs for the Hellraiser franchise. The comics contained a set of short stories, with Clive Barker acting as a consultant on all of the comics. Epic published twenty regular series comics, from 1989 to 1992. They also published three special issues from 1992 to 1994, one being a holiday special, as well as adapted a comic book version of Hellraiser and Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth.[34] Other releases included the limited series Clive Barker's Book of the Damned and Pinhead, as well as the crossovers Hellraiser vs. Nightbreed: Jihad and Pinhead vs. Marshal Law: Law in Hell.

Non-fiction

There have been two non-fiction books released that chronicle the Hellraiser franchise. The first, released on May 21, 2004, was published by Titan Books and titled The Hellraiser Chronicles. Written by Peter Atkins and Stephen Jones, with a foreword by Clive Barker, The Hellraiser Chronicles is a collection of production photographs, design sketches, excerpts from the scripts, and interviews with the cast and crew.[35] The next book, The Hellraiser Films And Their Legacy, was released by McFarland & Company on November 27, 2006; it was written by Paul Kane, and features foreword by Pinhead actor Doug Bradley.[1] Hellraiser Films collects the production history of all eight films, their spin-offs, as well as how the series relates to popular culture. The book provides an in-depth look at the film characters, and interpretations of the choices those characters make in the film. Hellraiser Films also provides a brief look at the short, fan film No More Souls.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b "The Hellraiser Films And Their Legacy (Hardcover)". Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Hellraiser-Films-Their-Legacy/dp/0786427523/. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  2. ^ a b David Maddox (2007). "The Hellraiser Films and Their Legacy: Review". Science Fiction Site. http://www.sfsite.com/07b/hr252.htm. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  3. ^ Loveline, May 15, 1997
  4. ^ Clive Barker (Director). (1987). Hellraiser. [DVD]. United Kingdom: New World Pictures.  
  5. ^ Tony Randel (Director). (1988). Hellbound: Hellraiser II. [DVD]. United Kingdom: New World Pictures.  
  6. ^ Anthony Hickox (Director). (1992). Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films.  
  7. ^ Kevin Yagher (Director). (1996). Hellraiser: Bloodline. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films.  
  8. ^ Scot Derrickson (Director). (2000). Hellraiser: Inferno. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films.  
  9. ^ Rick Bota (Director). (2002). Hellraiser: Hellseeker. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films.  
  10. ^ Rick Bota (Director). (2005). Hellraiser: Deader. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films.  
  11. ^ Rick Bota (Director). (2005). Hellraiser: Hellworld. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films.  
  12. ^ "Tom's Inflation Calculator". Half Hill. http://www.halfhill.com/inflation1.html. Retrieved 2009-02-19.  
  13. ^ "Hellraiser box office ranking". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=hellraiser.htm. Retrieved 2008-10-28.  
  14. ^ "Friday the 13th box office ranking". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=fridaythe13th.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  15. ^ "The Hannibal Lector series box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=hannibal.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  16. ^ "A Nightmare on Elm Street box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=nightmareonelmstreet.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  17. ^ "Halloween box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=halloween.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  18. ^ "Scream box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=scream.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  19. ^ "Saw box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=saw.htm. Retrieved 2008-09-05.  
  20. ^ "Psycho box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=psycho.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  21. ^ "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=texaschainsawmassacre.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  22. ^ "Child's Play box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=childsplay.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-17.  
  23. ^ "Hellraiser". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiser.htm. Retrieved 2008-10-28.  
  24. ^ "Hellraiser II: Hellbound". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiser2.htm. Retrieved 2008-10-28.  
  25. ^ "Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiser3.htm. Retrieved 2008-10-28.  
  26. ^ "Hellraiser: Bloodline". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiserbloodline.htm. Retrieved 2008-10-28.  
  27. ^ "Clive Barker Talks Hellraiser, Meat Train!". Bloody-Disgusting. 2007-07-28. http://www.bloody-disgusting.com/news/9499. Retrieved 2007-10-13.  
  28. ^ Blake (2007-10-13). "Inside Directors Speak on Hellraiser". Twitch Film. http://twitchfilm.net/site/view/inside-directors-speak-on-hellraiser/. Retrieved 2007-10-13.  
  29. ^ http://www.darkhorizons.com/news/13472/-hellraiser-rebooted-rather-than-remade/
  30. ^ http://www.aintitcool.com/node/39602
  31. ^ http://www.bloody-disgusting.com/news/15435
  32. ^ Pinhead Confirmed to Be Returning in 3D
  33. ^ "Hellbound Hearts". Simon & Schuster. http://books.simonandschuster.net/Hellbound-Hearts/Paul-Kane/9781439140901. Retrieved 2009-08-26.  
  34. ^ "List of Hellraiser comic books". CliveBarker.com. http://www.clivebarker.com/html/visions/bib/comics/hell/index.html. Retrieved 2008-11-23.  
  35. ^ "The Hellraiser Chronicles". Amazon.com. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hellraiser-Chronicles-Peter-Atkins/dp/1852864230/. Retrieved 2008-11-23.  

External links

Databases
Official
Miscellaneous

}} The Hellraiser Films And Their Legacy was released. The non-fiction book chronicled the production of the eight films, their spin-offs, and the franchise's legacy in popular culture.[1]]]

Hellraiser is a British horror franchise that consists of eight films, a series of comic books, as well as merchandise based on the series. The franchise is based on the novella The Hellbound Heart by Clive Barker, who would go on to write and direct the adaptation of his story, titled Hellraiser. The films, as well as the comic book series, continually features the Cenobite Pinhead. The series’ storyline focuses on a puzzle box that opens a gateway to another dimension, where the Cenobites come forth to take whomever opened the box back to their world, delivering an eternity of torture. Although Clive Barker wrote the original story, as well as wrote and directed the first film, he has not written or directed any of the succeeding sequels.

Contents

Films

Overview

In the original Hellraiser (1987), Frank Cotton (Sean Chapman) escapes from the Cenobites, who take pleasure in torturing him in an endless living Hell, when his brother Larry (Andrew Robinson) spills his own blood on the spot where Frank died opening a puzzle box that opened a gateway to the Cenobites. With the help of Larry's wife Julia (Clare Higgins), Frank begins regenerating his body with the blood of victims that Julia supplies him. Larry's daughter, Kirsty (Ashley Laurence), accidentally unleashes the Cenobites, but makes a deal to deliver Frank to them in exchange for her own life. After taking Frank, the Cenobites go back on their deal and try and take Kirsty as well. Solving the puzzle box, Kirsty sends the Cenobites back to Hell.[2]

In 1988, a sequel titled Hellbound: Hellraiser II follows Dr. Philip Channard (Kenneth Cranham) as he resurrects Julia, who was stuck in Hell with the Cenobites. Kirsty is pulled back into the Cenobite world, where the demons decide to keep her, but, having discovered the human identity of the Cenobites early, Kirsty appeals to their latent humanity, specifically the Cenobite leader Pinhead (Doug Bradley). Pinhead decides to release her, but he and his followers are killed by Channard, who has become a Cenobite himself. With help of a teenage girl, Tiffany (Imogen Boorman), who unknowingly assisted Channard in opening the box, Kirsty and Tiffany escape the Cenobite world and close the gateway behind them.[3]

In Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth (1992), the Cenobite Pinhead is trapped, along with the puzzle box, in the surface of an intricately carved pillar. The pillar is found by a night club owner, J.P. Monroe (Kevin Bernhardt), who begins assisting Pinhead in his resurrection. A television reporter, Joey Summerskill (Terry Farrell), begins to learn about Pinhead and the puzzle box, which leads her to Monroe's night club. Pinhead is eventually resurrected, and begins creating new Cenobite followers in an effort to establish Hell on Earth. Joey is able to use the puzzle box to send Pinhead back to his dimension; afterward, Joey submerges the box into freshly laid cement at a construction site.[4]

Hellraiser: Bloodline (1996) tells the story of the creator of the puzzle box, referred to as the Lament Configuration. A toymaker named Philip Lemarchand (Bruce Ramsay), commissioned by a Duc de L'Isle (Mickey Cottrell), a wealthy Aristocrat and master of the dark arts who wishes to open a gateway to Hell in order to enslave a demon. Beginning in the distant future, and tracing the history of the box from its creation in 1784, Bloodline shows how the Lemarchand family attempts to close the box forever after learning what L'Isle uses it for. Eventually, Dr. Paul Merchant creates the Elysium Configuration, a space station capable of closing the gateway for good, and he traps Pinhead inside and destroys him and the box.[5]

Hellraiser: Inferno (2000), the first of the succeeding sequels to be direct-to-video, follows Detective Joseph Thorne (Craig Sheffer) as he discovers the puzzle box while investigating a series of ritualistic murders. As time goes on he begins to uncover clues that suggest that he is the killer. Eventually, Pinhead shows up and informs Thorne that he is in his own personal hell, and will be reliving the same series of events for eternity.[6]

In Hellraiser: Hellseeker, Ashley Laurence returns to play Kirsty Cotton. In the 2002 film, Kirsty is married to Trevor (Dean Winters) when the two end up in a car accident that kills Kirsty. One month later, Trevor wakes up in a hospital and realizes that his wife is missing, but because of a head injury, his memory is uncertain and he cannot distinguish between fantasy and reality. Trevor finds himself the prime suspect in a murder case. Pinhead appears in the end, and informs Trevor that he was the one that died in the car crash, a sacrifice of Kirsty's, who had opened the puzzle box again.[7]

In Hellraiser: Deader (2005), reporter Amy Klein (Kari Wuhrer) is sent to Bucharest to investigate an underground suicide cult founded by a descendant of Philip Lemarchand, who claims to be able to bring back the dead. She is gradually drawn into their world and eventually sees no way out other than to join them. Pinhead and the Cenobites appear and kill everyone for attempting to invade their world. In order to prevent Pinhead from taking her soul, Amy kills herself.[8]

Hellraiser: Hellworld (2005) opens with five friends attending the funeral of a friend who died because of his obsession with the game "Hellworld". Two years later, the same five friends each complete the Lament Configuration on a website, earning an invitation to the "Hellworld" party at the Leviathan House. At the house, the host of the party (Lance Henriksen) takes them on a tour of the many layers of the home, and then drugs them with a psychedelic drug and buries them each in a coffin because he feels they were responsible for the death of his son earlier in the film. The police rescue the surviving teenagers, Chelsea (Katheryn Winnick) and Jake (Christopher Jacot), and the host is killed by Pinhead and the other Cenobites when he opens a puzzle box his son created.[9]

Crew

List indicator(s)

  • A dark grey cell indicates the information isn't available for the film.
Film Director Writer(s) Producer(s) Reception
1. Hellraiser Clive Barker Christopher Figg 62%
2. Hellbound Tony Randel Peter Atkins 64%
3. Hell on Earth Anthony Hickox Christopher Figg & Lawrence Mortorff 29%
4. Bloodline Kevin Yagher / Alan Smithee Nancy Rae Stone 30%
5. Inferno Scott Derrickson Paul Harris Boardman & Scott Derrickson N/A
6. Hellseeker Rick Bota Carl Dupre & Tim Day Mike Leahy & Ron Schmidt 00%
7. Deader Neal Marshall Stevens & Tim Day David Greathouse & Ron Schmidt 17%
8. Hellworld Carl Dupre Ron Schmidt 20%

Box office

When comparing the Hellraiser film series with the other top-grossing horror franchises—A Nightmare on Elm Street, Child's Play, Friday the 13th, Halloween, Saw, Scream, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre—and adjusting for the 2008 inflation,[10] Hellraiser is the lowest grossing horror franchise in the United States, at approximately $84 million.[11] The Hellraiser series is surpassed by Friday the 13th, which tops the list at 614 million.[12] The Hannibal Lecter film series follows closely with $573 million,[13] A Nightmare on Elm Street with $522 million,[14] Halloween with $517 million,[15] Scream with $400 million,[16] Saw with $378 million,[17] Psycho with $371 million,[18] The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with $315 million,[19] and the Child's Play film series rounding out the list with approximately $200 million.[20] It should be noted that only four of the eight Hellraiser films were released theatrically, with the remaining sequels going direct-to-video.

List indicator(s)

  • A dark grey cell indicates the information isn't available for the film.


Film Release date Budget Box office revenue Reference
1. Hellraiser September 18, 1987 $14,564,027 [21]
2. Hellbound: Hellraiser II December 23, 1988 $12,090,735 [22]
3. Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth September 11, 1992 $12,534,961 [23]
4. Hellraiser: Bloodline March 8, 1996 $9,336,886 [24]
5. Hellraiser: Inferno
6. Hellraiser: Hellseeker
7. Hellraiser: Deader
8. Hellraiser: Hellworld
Hellraiser film series $48,526,609

Future

Dimension Films is working to develop a remake of the original Hellraiser. Clive Barker had turned in a 45-page treatment which outlined a film that was filled with "horror and drama".[25] Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo, the directors of the French horror film Inside, were suppose to write and direct the Hellraiser remake, with Barker backing the pair 100 percent. However, their Barker-supported script was rejected by Dimension and they were replaced with the writers of Feast and Saw IV. The directors cited creative differences when they left the project.[26]

French filmmaker Pascal Laugier has since been attached to the new Hellraiser film which will be a reboot, and not a remake. It will mix elements from both the first film and Clive Barker's original novella, The Hellbound Heart. [27] Laugier has said "I won't betray Clive Barker's work. I want to do a fresh film filled with a lot of unexpected and surprising things. At the same time, I want it to be connected to the real, original material." Laugier further added "We'll get the chance to have much more money than even Clive had in the first film, so it will be of course more epic, it will be bigger, and I hope that it won't be softer." [28] Clive Barker's response to Laugier's involvement has been postive. "I liked Martyrs a lot," Barker commented "I'm very excited at the idea of [Laugier] doing it. Pascal is a very talented filmmaker, obviously a lot more talented than I was when I stepped onto the sound stage on [the first] Hellraiser and I hadn't really directed anything before… I am completely open and ready to be blown away. I don't have any possessiveness about it. I just want people to have fun." [29]

Literature

Comic books

In 1989, following the success of the Hellraiser and Hellbound: Hellraiser II, Epic Comics began publishing series of comic book spin-offs for the Hellraiser franchise. The comics contained a set of short stories, with Clive Barker acting as a consultant on all of the comics. Epic published twenty regular series comics, from 1989 to 1992. They also published three special issues from 1992 to 1994, one being a holiday special, as well as adapted a comic book version of Hellraiser and Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth.[30] Other releases included the limited series Clive Barker's Book of the Damned and Pinhead, as well as the crossovers Hellraiser vs. Nightbreed: Jihad and Pinhead vs. Marshal Law: Law in Hell.

Non-fiction

There have been two non-fiction books released that chronicle the Hellraiser franchise. The first, released on May 21, 2004, was published by Titan Books and titled The Hellraiser Chronicles. Written by Peter Atkins and Stephen Jones, with a foreword by Clive Barker, The Hellraiser Chronicles is a collection of production photographs, design sketches, excerpts from the scripts, and interviews with the cast and crew.[31] The next book, The Hellraiser Films And Their Legacy, was released by McFarland & Company on November 27, 2006; it was written by Paul Kane, and features foreword by Pinhead actor Doug Bradley.[32] Hellraiser Films collects the production history of all eight films, their spin-offs, as well as how the series relates to popular culture. The book provides an in-depth look at the film characters, and interpretations of the choices those characters make in the film. Hellraiser Films also provides a brief look at the short, fan film No More Souls.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 David Maddox (2007). "The Hellraiser Films and Their Legacy: Review". Science Fiction Site. http://www.sfsite.com/07b/hr252.htm. Retrieved on 2008-11-22. 
  2. Clive Barker (Director). (1987). Hellraiser. [DVD]. United Kingdom: New World Pictures. 
  3. Tony Randel (Director). (1988). Hellbound: Hellraiser II. [DVD]. United Kingdom: New World Pictures. 
  4. Anthony Hickox (Director). (1992). Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films. 
  5. Kevin Yagher (Director). (1996). Hellraiser: Bloodline. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films. 
  6. Scot Derrickson (Director). (2000). Hellraiser: Inferno. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films. 
  7. Rick Bota (Director). (2002). Hellraiser: Hellseeker. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films. 
  8. Rick Bota (Director). (2005). Hellraiser: Deader. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films. 
  9. Rick Bota (Director). (2005). Hellraiser: Hellworld. [DVD]. United States: Dimension Films. 
  10. "Tom's Inflation Calculator". Half Hill. http://www.halfhill.com/inflation1.html. Retrieved on 2009-02-19. 
  11. "Hellraiser box office ranking". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=hellraiser.htm. Retrieved on 2008-10-28. 
  12. "Friday the 13th box office ranking". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=fridaythe13th.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  13. "The Hannibal Lector series box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=hannibal.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  14. "A Nightmare on Elm Street box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=nightmareonelmstreet.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  15. "Halloween box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=halloween.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  16. "Scream box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=scream.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  17. "Saw box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=saw.htm. Retrieved on 2008-09-05. 
  18. "Psycho box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=psycho.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  19. "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=texaschainsawmassacre.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  20. "Child's Play box office rankings". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=childsplay.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-17. 
  21. "Hellraiser". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiser.htm. Retrieved on 2008-10-28. 
  22. "Hellraiser II: Hellbound". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiser2.htm. Retrieved on 2008-10-28. 
  23. "Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiser3.htm. Retrieved on 2008-10-28. 
  24. "Hellraiser: Bloodline". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=hellraiserbloodline.htm. Retrieved on 2008-10-28. 
  25. "Clive Barker Talks Hellraiser, Meat Train!". Bloody-Disgusting. 2007-07-28. http://www.bloody-disgusting.com/news/9499. Retrieved on 2007-10-13. 
  26. Blake (2007-10-13). "Inside Directors Speak on Hellraiser". Twitch Film. http://twitchfilm.net/site/view/inside-directors-speak-on-hellraiser/. Retrieved on 2007-10-13. 
  27. http://www.darkhorizons.com/news/13472/-hellraiser-rebooted-rather-than-remade/
  28. http://www.aintitcool.com/node/39602
  29. http://www.bloody-disgusting.com/news/15435
  30. "List of Hellraiser comic books". CliveBarker.com. http://www.clivebarker.com/html/visions/bib/comics/hell/index.html. Retrieved on 2008-11-23. 
  31. "The Hellraiser Chronicles". Amazon.com. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hellraiser-Chronicles-Peter-Atkins/dp/1852864230/. Retrieved on 2008-11-23. 
  32. Cite error: Invalid tag; no text was provided for refs named amazon

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