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Henry David Thoreau

Maxham daguerreotype of Henry David Thoreau made in 1856.
Full name Henry David Thoreau
Born July 12, 1817(1817-07-12)
Concord, Massachusetts
Died May 6, 1862 (aged 44)
Concord, Massachusetts
Era 19th century philosophy
Region Western Philosophy
School Transcendentalism
Main interests Natural history
Notable ideas Abolitionism, tax resistance, development criticism, civil disobedience, conscientious objection, direct action, environmentalism, nonviolent resistance, simple living
.Henry David Thoreau (born David Henry Thoreau; July 12, 1817– May 6, 1862)[1] was an American author, poet, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, philosopher, and leading transcendentalist.^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden, ch.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden , 1854 .
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862 .
  • Browse By Author: T - Project Gutenberg 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.^ His opposition to the Mexican War resulted in the influential essay, Civil Disobedience (1849).

^ Thoreau's argument that it was morally justified to peacefully resist unjust laws inspired Americans involved in the struggle against slavery and the fight for trade union rights and women's suffrage.

^ Thoreau's most popular book, Walden (1854), was a long autobiographical essay in which he set out his ideas on how the individual should live his life.

.Thoreau's books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry total over 20 volumes.^ Journal , edited by Bradford Torrey and Francis H. Allen, volumes 7-20 of The Writings of Henry David Thoreau (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1906); republished as The Journals of Henry David Thoreau , 2 volumes (New York: Dover, 1962).
  • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Thoreau's most popular book, Walden (1854), was a long autobiographical essay in which he set out his ideas on how the individual should live his life.

^ Thoreau's journal, the bedrock from which he mined material for all his books and essays, opens on 22 October 1837 with the words, "'What are you doing now?'
  • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Among his lasting contributions were his writings on natural history and philosophy, where he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern day environmentalism.^ Thoreau's special contribution was the application of the abstract tenets of Transcendentalism to the natural world, extending the spirit of reform into the new realm of environmentalism.
  • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Accordingly, "At length, on Saturday, the last day of August, 1839, we two, brothers, and natives of Concord, weighed anchor in this river port."
  • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Walking and writing became two phases of a single activity and the focus of each day.
  • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

His literary style interweaves close natural observation, personal experience, pointed rhetoric, symbolic meanings, and historical lore; while displaying a poetic sensibility, philosophical austerity, and "Yankee" love of practical detail.[2] .He was also deeply interested in the idea of survival in the face of hostile elements, historical change, and natural decay; at the same time imploring one to abandon waste and illusion in order to discover life's true essential needs.^ I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ As in geology, so in social institutions, we may discover the causes of all past changes in the present invariable order of society.
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Through an infirmity of our natures, we suppose a case, and put ourselves into it, and hence are in two cases at the same time, and it is doubly difficult to get out.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

[2]
.He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending abolitionist John Brown.^ He admired John Brown, the sturdy farmer with whom he had talked on his visits to Concord, as a liberator of men, and one who dared to defend the settlers' rights.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

Thoreau’s philosophy of civil disobedience influenced the political thoughts and actions of such later figures as Leo Tolstoy, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr.
Thoreau is sometimes cited as an individualist anarchist.[3] Though Civil Disobedience calls for improving rather than abolishing government– "I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government"[4]– the direction of this improvement aims at anarchism: “‘That government is best which governs not at all;’ and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.”[4]

Contents

Early life and education

.He was born David Henry Thoreau[5] in Concord, Massachusetts, to John Thoreau (a pencil maker) and Cynthia Dunbar.^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862 .
  • Browse By Author: T - Project Gutenberg 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau , attributed .
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau ( 1817-1862) .
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

His paternal grandfather was of French origin and was born in Jersey.[6] His maternal grandfather, Asa Dunbar, led Harvard's 1766 student "Butter Rebellion",[7] the first recorded student protest in the Colonies.[8] .David Henry was named after a recently deceased paternal uncle, David Thoreau.^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862 .
  • Browse By Author: T - Project Gutenberg 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau ( 1817-1862) .
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ David Henry Thoreau (his baptismal names were afterward transposed) was born in a farmhouse on the "Virginia Road," a mile and a half east of the village, July 12, 1817.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.He did not become “Henry David” until after college, although he never petitioned to make a legal name change.^ David Henry Thoreau (his baptismal names were afterward transposed) was born in a farmhouse on the "Virginia Road," a mile and a half east of the village, July 12, 1817.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[9] He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia.[10] .Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord and is currently the focus of preservation efforts.^ David Henry Thoreau (his baptismal names were afterward transposed) was born in a farmhouse on the "Virginia Road," a mile and a half east of the village, July 12, 1817.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

The house is original, but it now stands about 100 yards away from its first site.
Portrait of Thoreau from 1854.
.Amos Bronson Alcott and Thoreau's aunt each wrote that “Thoreau” is pronounced like the word “thorough”, whose standard American pronunciation rhymes with “furrow”.^ He always liked and respected Thoreau, but when he told me the story, he added, "I wouldn't have done it for old man Alcott."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[11] .In appearance he was homely, with a nose that he called “my most prominent feature.”[12] Of his face, Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote: "[Thoreau] is as ugly as sin, long-nosed, queer-mouthed, and with uncouth and rustic, though courteous manners, corresponding very well with such an exterior.^ Thoreau, perhaps remembering his homesickness while there, kindly wrote the following home letter to the little girl: -- Concord, July 31st, 1849.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Emerson, coming home from a visit to him during the last weeks of his life, wrote: -- "Henry praised to me the manners of an old, established, calm, well-behaved river, as distinguished from those of a new river.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In that year, Mr. Emerson wrote: "My good Henry Thoreau made this else solitary afternoon sunny with his simplicity and clear perception.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.But his ugliness is of an honest and agreeable fashion, and becomes him much better than beauty."^ But his ugliness is of an honest and agreeable fashion, and becomes him much better than beauty.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A man's ignorance sometimes is not only useful, but beautiful-while his knowledge, so called, is oftentimes worse than useless, besides being ugly.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

[13] .Thoreau also wore a neck-beard for many years, which he insisted many women found attractive[citation needed].^ Another, born on a farm, who knew and had worked in the black-lead mill many years, said, when I asked what he thought of Thoreau: "Why, he was the best friend I ever had.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Indeed, a half-century in advance of his time was Thoreau's attitude in many matters, as the change in thought and life in New England fifty years after his death shows.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau wrote and lectured against slavery and for many years was a member of the Underground Railway.

However, Louisa May Alcott reportedly mentioned to Ralph Waldo Emerson that Thoreau's facial hair "will most assuredly deflect amorous advances and preserve the man's virtue in perpetuity."[14]
.Thoreau studied at Harvard University between 1833 and 1837. He lived in Hollis Hall and took courses in rhetoric, classics, philosophy, mathematics, and science.^ After attending Harvard University (1833-1837) he joined with his brother to establish his own school in Concord.

^ Thoreau considered that one living bird for study, in its proper haunts, was worth more than a sackful of bird-skins and skeletons.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Wikipedia The Relations Between Religion and Science Eight Lectures Preached Before the University of Oxford in the Year 1884 (English) (as Author) Templeton, Timothy .
  • Browse By Author: T - Project Gutenberg 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

A legend proposes that Thoreau refused to pay the five-dollar fee for a Harvard diploma. .In fact, the master's degree he declined to purchase had no academic merit: Harvard College offered it to graduates "who proved their physical worth by being alive three years after graduating, and their saving, earning, or inheriting quality or condition by having Five Dollars to give the college."^ But Lowell must be credited with this high praise of Thoreau's quality as a writer: -- "With every exception there is no writing comparable with Thoreau's in kind, that is comparable with it in degree where it is best soil."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau, senior, therefore increased his business and received good prices, at first ten dollars a pound, -- though later it gradually fell to two dollars, -- and sometimes selling five hundred pounds a year.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ His vote is of no more worth than that of any unprincipled foreigner or hireling native, who may have been bought.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

[15] .His comment was: "Let every sheep keep its own skin",[16] a reference to the tradition of diplomas being written on sheepskin vellum.^ Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ "Every human being is the artificer of his own fate.

Return to Concord: 1837-1841

.The traditional professions open to college graduates: law, the church, business, medicine; failed to interest Thoreau [17]:25 So he took a leave of absence and during that leave of absence from Harvard in 1835, Thoreau taught school in Canton, Massachusetts.^ Failing to find at once a better opportunity afar, Thoreau took charge of the Town School in Concord, but, it is said, proving heretical as to Solomon's maxim concerning the rod, did not satisfy the Committeeman, who was a deacon.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau talked with them in his walks and took some kindly interest.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.After he graduated in 1837, he joined the faculty of the Concord public school, but resigned after a few weeks rather than administer corporal punishment.^ After attending Harvard University (1833-1837) he joined with his brother to establish his own school in Concord.

[17]:25 .He and his brother John then opened a grammar school in Concord in 1838 called Concord Academy.^ John and Henry took the Concord Academy.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ After attending Harvard University (1833-1837) he joined with his brother to establish his own school in Concord.

[17]:25 They introduced several progressive concepts, including nature walks and visits to local shops and businesses. The school ended when John became fatally ill from tetanus in 1842[18] after cutting himself while shaving. He died in his brother Henry's arms.[19]
.Upon graduation Thoreau returned home to Concord, where he met Ralph Waldo Emerson.^ [Ralph Waldo Emerson] asked.

^ Thoreau, perhaps remembering his homesickness while there, kindly wrote the following home letter to the little girl: -- Concord, July 31st, 1849.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He lived for a time in Concord, near the Thoreaus, when a hunted slave came to the village by night to the home of that family.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Emerson took a paternal and at times patronizing interest in Thoreau, advising the young man and introducing him to a circle of local writers and thinkers, including Ellery Channing, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, and Nathaniel Hawthorne and his son Julian Hawthorne, who was a boy at the time.^ The shy Hawthorne went to the Manse, temporarily unoccupied by the Ripley family, and the interesting though perverse genius, William Ellery Channing, with his fair young wife (Margaret Fuller's sister), looking like a Madonna of Raphael's, took a little house on the broad meadow just beyond Emerson's.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau loved nature and spent most of his free time exploring the local countryside.

^ Is Franklin the only man who is lost, that his wife should be so earnest to find him?
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Emerson urged Thoreau to contribute essays and poems to a quarterly periodical, The Dial, and Emerson lobbied editor Margaret Fuller to publish those writings.^ In Mr. Emerson's journal for August, 1839, is written: "Last night came to me a beautiful poem from Henry Thoreau, 'Sympathy.'
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1837, the boy of twenty, just graduated, and his writings, had been brought to Mrs. Emerson's notice by Mr. Emerson's sister, Mrs. Brown, who boarded with the Thoreaus.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson (English) (as Editor) Honey-Sweet (English) (as Author) Tuson, William .
  • Browse By Author: T - Project Gutenberg 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

.Thoreau’s first essay published there was Aulus Persius Flaccus, an essay on the playwright of the same name, published in The Dial in July 1840.[20] It consisted of revised passages from his journal, which he had begun keeping at Emerson’s suggestion.^ A little later Thoreau's family put his Journals into Mr. Emerson's hands for him to read.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In Mr. Emerson's journal for August, 1839, is written: "Last night came to me a beautiful poem from Henry Thoreau, 'Sympathy.'
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ David Henry Thoreau (his baptismal names were afterward transposed) was born in a farmhouse on the "Virginia Road," a mile and a half east of the village, July 12, 1817.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The first journal entry on October 22, 1837, reads, "‘What are you doing now?’ he asked.^ Read the best books first, or you may not have a chance to read them at all.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ ""What are you doing now?"

‘Do you keep a journal?’ .So I make my first entry today."^ So I make my first entry today."

Thoreau was a philosopher of nature and its relation to the human condition. In his early years he followed Transcendentalism, a loose and eclectic idealist philosophy advocated by Emerson, Fuller, and Alcott. .They held that an ideal spiritual state transcends, or goes beyond, the physical and empirical, and that one achieves that insight via personal intuition rather than religious doctrine.^ Yes, he was religious; he was more like the ministers than others; that is, like what they would wish and try to be.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ It was the act of a poet rather than a logician -- symbolic -- but read his paper on "Civil Disobedience," and, whatever one thinks of the conclusion, one must respect the man.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ If others pay the tax which is demanded of me, from a sympathy with the State, they do but what they have already done in their own case, or rather they abet injustice to a greater extent than the State requires.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

In their view, Nature is the outward sign of inward spirit, expressing the “radical correspondence of visible things and human thoughts,” as Emerson wrote in Nature (1836).
1967 U.S. postage stamp honoring Thoreau.
.On April 18, 1841, Thoreau moved into the Emerson house.^ The matter being generously settled, Thoreau came into the house and sat down to rest in the study.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ A little later Thoreau's family put his Journals into Mr. Emerson's hands for him to read.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau helped Alcott build the really beautiful summer-house of knotted oak and twisted pine for Mr. Emerson while he was in Europe in 1847-48.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[21] There, from 1841-1844, he served as the children’s tutor, editorial assistant, and repair man/gardener. .For a few months in 1843, he moved to the home of William Emerson on Staten Island,[22] and tutored the family sons while seeking contacts among literary men and journalists in the city who might help publish his writings, including his future literary representative Horace Greeley.^ In 1843, after he had lived more than a year with the Emersons, Thoreau went to Staten Island as tutor to one of Mr. William Emerson's sons for several months.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He relieved his friend Emerson from tasks hopeless to him by his skill in gardening and general household works, and went for a time to Staten Island as a private tutor to the son of Emerson's older brother, William .11 In this visit to New York he became acquainted with Horace Greeley, who appreciated his work and showed himself always generous and helpful in bringing it to publication in various magazines, and getting him paid for it.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau, while a homesick tutor in Staten Island, in a letter to Emerson thus shows that friendship with the new-comers had begun: -- "DEAR FRIENDS: -- I was very glad to hear your voices from so far....
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[23]:68
.Thoreau returned to Concord and worked in his family's pencil factory, which he continued to do for most of his adult life.^ He lived for a time in Concord, near the Thoreaus, when a hunted slave came to the village by night to the home of that family.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Though Channing remained in Concord most of his life, Hawthorne at that time stayed but two years.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ John Thoreau, senior, went into the pencil business on his return to Concord in 1823.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.He rediscovered the process to make a good pencil out of inferior graphite by using clay as the binder; this invention improved upon graphite found in New Hampshire and bought in 1821 by relative Charles Dunbar.^ Henry found in the College library, in an encyclopædia published in Edinburgh, what the graphite ("black lead") was mixed with in the good German pencils, viz., a certain fine Bavarian clay; while here, glue, with a little spermaceti, or bayberry wax, was used.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Horace Hosmer, who, for a time, was the travelling selling agent of the pencils, stated that the Bavarian clay was used here at that time by the New England Glass Company, and by the Phœnix Crucible Company of Taunton.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ After a time the purpose for which their lead was bought was found out by the Thoreaus and they sold it to various firms until after the death of Mr. John Thoreau and his son Henry, when the business was sold by Mrs. Thoreau.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

(The process of mixing graphite and clay, known as the Conté process, was patented by Nicolas-Jacques Conté in 1795). His other source had been Tantiusques, an Indian operated mine in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Later, Thoreau converted the factory to produce plumbago (graphite), which was used to ink typesetting machines.[24]
.Once back in Concord, Thoreau went through a restless period.^ John Thoreau, senior, went into the pencil business on his return to Concord in 1823.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ His friend and companion, Edward Hoar, said to me, "With Thoreau's life something went out of Concord woods and fields and river that never will return.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.In April 1844 he and his friend Edward Hoar accidentally set a fire that consumed 300 acres (1.2 km2) of Walden Woods.^ His friend and companion, Edward Hoar, said to me, "With Thoreau's life something went out of Concord woods and fields and river that never will return.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[25] .He spoke often of finding a farm to buy or lease, which he felt would give him a means to support himself while also providing enough solitude to write his first book[citation needed].^ His simple, direct speech and look and bearing were such that no plain, common man would put him down in his books as a fool, or visionary, or helpless, as the scholar, writer, or reformer would often be regarded by him.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry bravely recovered himself from the blow his brother's loss had been at first, when those who knew him said it seemed as if a part of himself had been torn away.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ A saner man would have found himself often enough in formal opposition to what are deemed the most sacred laws of society, through obedience to yet more sacred laws, and so have tested his resolution without going out of his way.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

Civil Disobedience and the Walden years: 1845–1849

.Thoreau embarked on a two-year experiment in simple living on July 4, 1845, when he moved to a small, self-built house on land owned by Emerson in a second-growth forest around the shores of Walden Pond.^ In that year, Mr. Emerson wrote: "My good Henry Thoreau made this else solitary afternoon sunny with his simplicity and clear perception.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He was at that time living at the house as kindly protector and friend of Mrs. Emerson and the three young children, and attending to his absent friend's affairs in house, garden, and wood-lot.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1843, after he had lived more than a year with the Emersons, Thoreau went to Staten Island as tutor to one of Mr. William Emerson's sons for several months.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

The house was not in wilderness but at the edge of town, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from his family home.[citation needed]
.On July 24 or July 25, 1846, Thoreau ran into the local tax collector, Sam Staples, who asked him to pay six years of delinquent poll taxes.^ He asked him if he knew Thoreau.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ If a thousand men were not to pay their tax-bills this year, that would not be a violent and bloody measure, as it would be to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A little later Thoreau's family put his Journals into Mr. Emerson's hands for him to read.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

Thoreau refused because of his opposition to the Mexican-American War and slavery, and he spent a night in jail because of this refusal. (The next day Thoreau was freed, against his wishes, when his aunt paid his taxes.[26]) The experience had a strong impact on Thoreau. In January and February 1848, he delivered lectures on "The Rights and Duties of the Individual in relation to Government"[27] explaining his tax resistance at the Concord Lyceum. Bronson Alcott attended the lecture, writing in his journal on January 26:
.
Heard Thoreau’s lecture before the Lyceum on the relation of the individual to the State– an admirable statement of the rights of the individual to self-government, and an attentive audience.^ Thoreau said he once overheard one of his auditors at a country Lyceum after the lecture say to another, "What does he lecture for?"
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

His allusions to the Mexican War, to Mr. Hoar’s expulsion from Carolina, his own imprisonment in Concord Jail for refusal to pay his tax, Mr. Hoar’s payment of mine when taken to prison for a similar refusal, were all pertinent, well considered, and reasoned. I took great pleasure in this deed of Thoreau’s.
Bronson AlcottJournals (1938)[28]
Thoreau revised the lecture into an essay entitled Resistance to Civil Government (also known as Civil Disobedience). In May 1849 it was published by Elizabeth Peabody in the Aesthetic Papers. Thoreau had taken up a version of Percy Shelley's principle in the political poem The Mask of Anarchy (1819), that Shelley begins with the powerful images of the unjust forms of authority of his time - and then imagines the stirrings of a radically new form of social action.[29]
.
At Walden Pond, he completed a first draft of A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, an elegy to his brother, John, that described their 1839 trip to the White Mountains.
^ He prepared there his first and perhaps best book, the "Week on the Concord and Merrimac Rivers," for publication; he tried his spiritual, intellectual, social and economic experiment, and recorded it; and incidentally made an interesting survey and history of one of the most beautiful and remarkable ponds in Massachusetts.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ "When I first came, a little boy, John said 'I want you to be a good boy and study, because you are my friend's little brother.'
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He told me that the brothers organized a survey of Fairhaven Hill in Concord and the river-shore below it, to give the boys an idea of the field-work of surveying, and the use of instruments.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Thoreau did not find a publisher for this book and instead printed 1,000 copies at his own expense, though fewer than 300 were sold.^ I loved to hear him talk, but I did not like his books so well, though I often read them and took what I liked.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[21]:234 .Thoreau self-published on the advice of Emerson, using Emerson’s own publisher, Munroe, who did little to publicize the book.^ A little later Thoreau's family put his Journals into Mr. Emerson's hands for him to read.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ After dark, some person, unrecognized by Staples's little daughter, who went to the door, left with the child some money "to pay Mr. Thoreau's tax."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Emerson wrote of Thoreau: "He who sees the horizon may securely say what he pleases of any twig or tree between him and it."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Its failure put Thoreau into debt that took years to pay off, and Emerson’s flawed advice caused a schism between the friends that never entirely healed.^ So Thoreau took it in charge for his friend.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ A little later Thoreau's family put his Journals into Mr. Emerson's hands for him to read.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In that year, Mr. Emerson wrote: "My good Henry Thoreau made this else solitary afternoon sunny with his simplicity and clear perception.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[citation needed]
.In August 1846, Thoreau briefly left Walden to make a trip to Mount Katahdin in Maine, a journey later recorded in “Ktaadn,” the first part of The Maine Woods.^ He soon became the guide and companion of our early expeditions afield, and, later, the advisor of our first camping trips.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ And, first, it must be remembered that the part of his life lived in the Walden house was from July 4, 1845, to September 6, 1847, just two years and two months of his forty-four years of life.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Thoreau left Walden Pond on September 6, 1847.[21]:244 Over several years, he worked to pay off his debts and also continuously revised his manuscript for what, in 1854, he would publish as Walden, or Life in the Woods, recounting the two years, two months, and two days he had spent at Walden Pond.^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden , 1854 .
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If a thousand men were not to pay their tax-bills this year, that would not be a violent and bloody measure, as it would be to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Irishmen on the railroad were obliged to leave off their work for several days, and the farmers left their fields and sought the shade.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

The book compresses that time into a single calendar year, using the passage of four seasons to symbolize human development. .Part memoir and part spiritual quest, Walden at first won few admirers, but today critics regard it as a classic American work that explores natural simplicity, harmony, and beauty as models for just social and cultural conditions.^ And, first, it must be remembered that the part of his life lived in the Walden house was from July 4, 1845, to September 6, 1847, just two years and two months of his forty-four years of life.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

Later years: 1851-1862

Henry David Thoreau, taken August 1861.
.In 1851, Thoreau became increasingly fascinated with natural history and travel/expedition narratives.^ The virtue of Thoreau has always commanded respect; of his knowledge of Natural History, Lowell alone, as far as I know, has spoken slightingly.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.He read avidly on botany and often wrote observations on this topic into his journal.^ A little later Thoreau's family put his Journals into Mr. Emerson's hands for him to read.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau wrote in his journal: "It is always a recommendation to me to know that a man has ever been poor, has been regularly born into this world; knows the language....
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

He admired William Bartram, and Charles Darwin’s Voyage of the Beagle. He kept detailed observations on Concord's nature lore, recording everything from how the fruit ripened over time to the fluctuating depths of Walden Pond and the days certain birds migrated. The point of this task was to “anticipate” the seasons of nature, in his words.[30]
He became a land surveyor and continued to write increasingly detailed natural history observations about the 26 square miles (67 km2) township in his journal, a two-million word document he kept for 24 years. .He also kept a series of notebooks, and these observations became the source for Thoreau's late natural history writings, such as Autumnal Tints, The Succession of Trees, and Wild Apples, an essay bemoaning the destruction of indigenous and wild apple species.^ The virtue of Thoreau has always commanded respect; of his knowledge of Natural History, Lowell alone, as far as I know, has spoken slightingly.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Such homage Nature ne'er forgets; And yearly on the coverlid 'Neath which her darling lieth hid Will write his name in violets.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ However, at the request of the selectmen, I condescended to make some such statement as this in writing:‑‑Know all men by these presents, that I, Henry Thoreau, do not wish to be regarded as a member of any incorporated society which I have not joined.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

Until the 1970s, literary critics dismissed Thoreau’s late pursuits as amateur science and philosophy. .With the rise of environmental history and ecocriticism, several new readings of this matter began to emerge, showing Thoreau to be both a philosopher and an analyst of ecological patterns in fields and woodlots.^ Indeed, a half-century in advance of his time was Thoreau's attitude in many matters, as the change in thought and life in New England fifty years after his death shows.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ To a philosopher all news, as it is called, is gossip, and they who edit and read it are old women over their tea.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

For instance, his late essay, "The Succession of Forest Trees," shows that he used experimentation and analysis to explain how forests regenerate after fire or human destruction, through dispersal by seed-bearing winds or animals.
.He traveled to Quebec once, Cape Cod four times, and Maine three times; these landscapes inspired his "excursion" books, A Yankee in Canada, Cape Cod, and The Maine Woods, in which travel itineraries frame his thoughts about geography, history and philosophy.^ He was at that time living at the house as kindly protector and friend of Mrs. Emerson and the three young children, and attending to his absent friend's affairs in house, garden, and wood-lot.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

Other travels took him southwest to Philadelphia and New York City in 1854, and west across the Great Lakes region in 1861, visiting Niagara Falls, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Mackinac Island.[31] Although provincial in his physical travels, he was extraordinarily well-read and vicariously a world traveler. He obsessively devoured all the first-hand travel accounts available in his day, at a time when the last unmapped regions of the earth were being explored. He read Magellan and Cook, the arctic explorers Franklin, Mackenzie and Parry, Darwin's account of his voyage on the Beagle, Livingstone and Burton on Africa, Lewis and Clark; and hundreds of lesser-known works by explorers and literate travelers.[32] Astonishing amounts of global reading fed his endless curiosity about the peoples, cultures, religions and natural history of the world, and left its traces as commentaries in his voluminous journals. He processed everything he read, in the local laboratory of his Concord experience. Among his famous aphorisms is his advice to "Live at home like a traveler."
.After John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry, many prominent voices in the abolitionist movement distanced themselves from Brown, or damned him with faint praise.^ In the first days of the Harper's Ferry raid, when Brown's friends and backers, hitherto, were in doubt as to their attitude in this crisis, Thoreau, taking counsel of none, announced that he should speak in the church vestry, on John Brown, to whoever came.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

Thoreau was disgusted by this, and he composed a speech – A Plea for Captain John Brown – which was uncompromising in its defense of Brown and his actions. Thoreau’s speech proved persuasive: first the abolitionist movement began to accept Brown as a martyr, and by the time of the American Civil War entire armies of the North were literally singing Brown’s praises. As a contemporary biographer of John Brown put it: “If, as Alfred Kazin suggests, without John Brown there would have been no Civil War, we would add that without the Concord Transcendentalists, John Brown would have had little cultural impact.”[33]

Death

Thoreau family graves at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.
Thoreau contracted tuberculosis in 1835 and suffered from it sporadically afterwards. .In 1859, following a late night excursion to count the rings of tree stumps during a rain storm, he became ill with bronchitis.^ Even his health could not throw off a chill got by long stooping in a wet snow storm counting the growth-rings on the stumps of some old trees.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

His health declined over three years with brief periods of remission, until he eventually became bedridden. .Recognizing the terminal nature of his disease, Thoreau spent his last years revising and editing his unpublished works, particularly The Maine Woods and Excursions, and petitioning publishers to print revised editions of A Week and Walden.^ Another, born on a farm, who knew and had worked in the black-lead mill many years, said, when I asked what he thought of Thoreau: "Why, he was the best friend I ever had.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau with friendly courtesy did the honours of the river and the wood to each man in turn, for he held with Emerson that Nature says "One to one, my dear."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I talked with the mechanic who showed me this, and who worked with the Thoreaus from the first, was actively helpful in the improvements and at last bought out the business from Mrs. Thoreau and carried it on for years, -- and with others who knew something of the matter.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

He also wrote letters and journal entries until he became too weak to continue. His friends were alarmed at his diminished appearance and were fascinated by his tranquil acceptance of death. .When his aunt Louisa asked him in his last weeks if he had made his peace with God, Thoreau responded: "I did not know we had ever quarreled."^ "I did not know we had ever quarrelled, Aunt," was the pleasant answer.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He asked him if he knew Thoreau.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ When we left the table and were passing into the parlour, Thoreau asked me to come with him to our East door -- our more homelike door, facing the orchard.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[34]
.Aware he was dying, Thoreau's last words were "Now comes good sailing", followed by two lone words, "moose" and "Indian".[35] He died on May 6, 1862 at age 44. Bronson Alcott planned the service and read selections from Thoreau's works, and Channing presented a hymn.^ How Thoreau felt when alone with Nature may be gathered from his words about her, "At once our Destiny and Abode, our Maker and our Life."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ The late George Bradford Bartlett remembered Thoreau's coming often to his father, good Doctor Bartlett's house.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Miles thinks that John Thoreau, Sr., may have thought of the air-blast plan, but that Henry at any rate worked out the details.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[36] Emerson wrote the eulogy spoken at his funeral.[37] Originally buried in the Dunbar family plot, he and members of his immediate family were eventually moved to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery (N42° 27' 53.7" W71° 20' 33") in Concord, Massachusetts.
.Thoreau’s friend Ellery Channing published his first biography, Thoreau the Poet-Naturalist, in 1873, and Channing and another friend Harrison Blake edited some poems, essays, and journal entries for posthumous publication in the 1890s.^ Henry David Thoreau , Journals, 1906 1842 entry .
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

.Thoreau’s journals, which he often mined for his published works but which remained largely unpublished at his death, were first published in 1906 and helped to build his modern reputation.^ Thoreau helped Alcott build the really beautiful summer-house of knotted oak and twisted pine for Mr. Emerson while he was in Europe in 1847-48.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I talked with the mechanic who showed me this, and who worked with the Thoreaus from the first, was actively helpful in the improvements and at last bought out the business from Mrs. Thoreau and carried it on for years, -- and with others who knew something of the matter.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

A new, expanded edition of the journals is underway, published by Princeton University Press. .Today, Thoreau is regarded as one of the foremost American writers, both for the modern clarity of his prose style and the prescience of his views on nature and politics.^ Thoreau with friendly courtesy did the honours of the river and the wood to each man in turn, for he held with Emerson that Nature says "One to one, my dear."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

His memory is honored by the international Thoreau Society.

Beliefs

Thoreau memorial at Library Way, New York City.
“Most of the luxuries and many of the so-called comforts of life are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind.”
— Thoreau [38]
Thoreau was an early advocate of recreational hiking and canoeing, of conserving natural resources on private land, and of preserving wilderness as public land. Thoreau was also one of the first American supporters of Darwin's theory of evolution. He was not a strict vegetarian, though he said he preferred that diet[39] and advocated it as a means of self-improvement. He wrote in Walden: “The practical objection to animal food in my case was its uncleanness; and besides, when I had caught and cleaned and cooked and eaten my fish, they seemed not to have fed me essentially. .It was insignificant and unnecessary, and cost more than it came to.^ A look, a gesture, an act, which to everybody else is insignificant tells you more about that one than words can.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

A little bread or a few potatoes would have done as well, with less trouble and filth.”[40]
Thoreau neither rejected civilization nor fully embraced wilderness. Instead he sought a middle ground, the pastoral realm that integrates both nature and culture. His philosophy required that he be a didactic arbitration between the wilderness he based so much on and the spreading mass of North American humanity. .He decried the latter endlessly but felt the teachers need to be close to those who needed to hear what he wanted to tell them.^ Speech is for the convenience of those who are hard of hearing; but there are many fine things which we cannot say if we have to shout.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I quarrel not with far‑off foes, but with those who, near at home, co‑operate with, and do the bidding of, those far away, and without whom the latter would be harmless.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

.He was in many ways a 'visible saint', a point of contact with the wilds, even if the land he lived on had been gifted to him by Emerson and was far from cut-off.^ Where I lived was as far off as many a region viewed nightly by astronomers.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ It is not many moments that I live under a government, even in this world.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Taking for his motto, -- "Make courage for life to be Capitaine Chief," he, with truth and Nature to help him, cut a way through to freedom.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The wildness he enjoyed was the nearby swamp or forest, and he preferred “partially cultivated country.” His idea of being “far in the recesses of the wilderness” of Maine was to “travel the logger’s path and the Indian trail,” but he also hiked on pristine untouched land.^ It was like traveling into a far country, such as I had never expected to behold, to lie there for one night.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau enjoyed his surveying, and the more if it led him into the wild lands East of the Sun, West of the Moon.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.In the essay “Henry David Thoreau, Philosopher” Roderick Nash writes: “Thoreau left Concord in 1846 for the first of three trips to northern Maine.^ Henry David Thoreau , attributed .
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau ( 1817-1862) .
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden, ch.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

His expectations were high because he hoped to find genuine, primeval America. .But contact with real wilderness in Maine affected him far differently than had the idea of wilderness in Concord.^ "That the light which he hid under a bushel was worth more than the personal and real estate of Concord at that time.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ He is far more real, and daily practically obeying them, than I, and fortifies my memory at all times with an affirmative experience which refuses to be set aside."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

Instead of coming out of the woods with a deepened appreciation of the wilds, Thoreau felt a greater respect for civilization and realized the necessity of balance.”[citation needed]
On alcohol, Thoreau wrote: “I would fain keep sober always… I believe that water is the only drink for a wise man; wine is not so noble a liquor… Of all ebriosity, who does not prefer to be intoxicated by the air he breathes?”[40]

Influence

Thoreau’s writings influenced many public figures. Political leaders and reformers like Mahatma Gandhi, President John F. Kennedy, civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr., Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, and Russian author Leo Tolstoy all spoke of being strongly affected by Thoreau’s work, particularly Civil Disobedience. So did many artists and authors including Edward Abbey, Willa Cather, Marcel Proust, William Butler Yeats, Sinclair Lewis, Ernest Hemingway, Upton Sinclair,[41] E. B. White, Lewis Mumford [42], Frank Lloyd Wright, Alexander Posey [43] and Gustav Stickley. [44] . Thoreau also influenced naturalists like John Burroughs, John Muir, E. O. Wilson, Edwin Way Teale, Joseph Wood Krutch, B. F. Skinner, David Brower and Loren Eiseley, whom Publisher's Weekly called "the modern Thoreau." [45] Anarchist and feminist Emma Goldman also appreciated Thoreau and referred to him as “the greatest American anarchist.” English writer Henry Stephens Salt wrote a biography of Thoreau in 1890,which popularized Thoreau's ideas in Britain: George Bernard Shaw, Edward Carpenter and Robert Blatchford were among those who became Thoreau enthusiasts as a result of Salt's advocacy. [46]
Mahatma Gandhi first read Walden in 1906 while working as a civil rights activist in Johannesburg, South Africa. He told American reporter Webb Miller, "[Thoreau's] ideas influenced me greatly. .I adopted some of them and recommended the study of Thoreau to all of my friends who were helping me in the cause of Indian Independence.^ The man of whom I speak was the friend of my childhood and early youth, and living and dead has helped me, and in no common way.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Yesterday I found a nice arrowhead, which was lost some time before by an Indian who was hunting there.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ After dark, some person, unrecognized by Staples's little daughter, who went to the door, left with the child some money "to pay Mr. Thoreau's tax."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Why I actually took the name of my movement from Thoreau's essay 'On the Duty of Civil Disobedience,' written about 80 years ago."^ In that year, Mr. Emerson wrote: "My good Henry Thoreau made this else solitary afternoon sunny with his simplicity and clear perception.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Here is Thoreau's word seventy-five years ago.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[47]
Martin Luther King, Jr. noted in his autobiography that his first encounter with the idea of non-violent resistance was reading "On Civil Disobedience" in 1944 while attending Morehouse College. He wrote in his autobiography that it was
.Here, in this courageous New Englander's refusal to pay his taxes and his choice of jail rather than support a war that would spread slavery's territory into Mexico, I made my first contact with the theory of nonviolent resistance.^ If others pay the tax which is demanded of me, from a sympathy with the State, they do but what they have already done in their own case, or rather they abet injustice to a greater extent than the State requires.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ It is for no particular item in the tax‑ bill that I refuse to pay it.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ They think that, if they should resist, the remedy would be worse than the evil.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

Fascinated by the idea of refusing to cooperate with an evil system, I was so deeply moved that I reread the work several times.
I became convinced that noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good. .No other person has been more eloquent and passionate in getting this idea across than Henry David Thoreau.^ Henry David Thoreau , attributed .
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau ( 1817-1862) .
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden, ch.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

As a result of his writings and personal witness, we are the heirs of a legacy of creative protest. .The teachings of Thoreau came alive in our civil rights movement; indeed, they are more alive than ever before.^ Moreover, any man more right than his neighbors constitutes a majority of one already.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ When we left the table and were passing into the parlour, Thoreau asked me to come with him to our East door -- our more homelike door, facing the orchard.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ It is not my business to be petitioning the Governor or the Legislature any more than it is theirs to petition me; and, if they should not hear my petition, what should I do then?
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Whether expressed in a sit-in at lunch counters, a freedom ride into Mississippi, a peaceful protest in Albany, Georgia, a bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, these are outgrowths of Thoreau's insistence that evil must be resisted and that no moral man can patiently adjust to injustice.^ But Lowell must be credited with this high praise of Thoreau's quality as a writer: -- "With every exception there is no writing comparable with Thoreau's in kind, that is comparable with it in degree where it is best soil."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ These lean periods occurred when this good man could find no hearing for the spiritual mission, especially to the young, to which he felt himself called.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[48]
The University of Michigan's New England Literature Program is an experiential literature and writing program run through the university's Department of English Language and Literature which was started in the 1970s by professors Alan Howes and Walter Clark. .Howes and Clark called upon Thoreauvian ideals of nature, independence and community to create an academic program modeled after Thoreau's experiment at Walden Pond.^ He used to visit Thoreau at Walden and remembers how the house was arranged.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Today, students at NELP study Thoreau's work– as well as that of several other New England writers from the 19th and 20th centuries– in relative isolation on Sebago Lake in Raymond, Maine.^ Indeed, a half-century in advance of his time was Thoreau's attitude in many matters, as the change in thought and life in New England fifty years after his death shows.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.American psychologist B. F. Skinner wrote that he carried a copy of Thoreau's Walden with him in his youth.^ Emerson wrote of Thoreau: "He who sees the horizon may securely say what he pleases of any twig or tree between him and it."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau, living by Walden wrote: "In a pleasant spring morning all men's sins are forgiven.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ This man said that, in his early youth, in Russia, he had read one of Thoreau's books, and it had determined him to become a free man and helped him through the toil and danger required.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[49] and, in .1945, wrote Walden Two, a fictional utopia about 1,000 members of a community living together inspired by the life of Thoreau.^ To speak critically, I never received more than one or two letters in my life-I wrote this some years agothat were worth the postage.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ How Thoreau felt when alone with Nature may be gathered from his words about her, "At once our Destiny and Abode, our Maker and our Life."
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau, living by Walden wrote: "In a pleasant spring morning all men's sins are forgiven.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[50]
Thoreau inspired children's book author and illustrator D.B. Johnson to create a series of picture books based on Thoreau. The first book Henry Hikes to Fitchburg has become a bestseller.[citation needed]
Thoreau and his fellow Transcendentalists from Concord were a major inspiration of the composer Charles Ives. The 4th movement of the Concord Sonata for piano (with a part for flute, Thoreau's instrument) is a character picture and he also set Thoreau's words.[51]

Anarchism

Anarchism started to have an ecological view mainly in the writings of Thoreau. .In his book Walden "Many have seen in Thoreau one of the precursors of ecologism and anarcho-primitivism represented today in John Zerzan.^ In his books, particularly "Walden," the contentious tone may linger unpleasantly in the reader's ears and memory, but remember, Thoreau, in his day, was administering wholesome, if bitter, medicine.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ This man said that, in his early youth, in Russia, he had read one of Thoreau's books, and it had determined him to become a free man and helped him through the toil and danger required.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ 'The aspirations of parents often become realizations in the children'; John Thoreau and wife were seen year after year on the west bank of the Assabet, on Fairhaven, Lee's Hill, [Nashawtuc] and at Walden.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

For George Woodcock this attitude can be also motivated by certain idea of resistance to progress and of rejection of the growing materialism which is the nature of american society in the mid XIX century." In the late 19th century Anarchist naturism appeared as the union of anarchist and naturist philosophies.[52][53] Mainly it had importance within individualist anarchist circles[54][55] in Spain[52][54][53], France[54][56] and Portugal[57]. An important influence was Thoreau. John Zerzan himself included the text "Excursions" (1863) by Thoreau in his edited compilation of anti-civilization writings called Against civilization: Readings and reflections from 1999.[58]
Anarchist and feminist Emma Goldman also appreciated Thoreau and referred to him as “the greatest American anarchist.”

Critique

Thoreau’s ideas were not universally applauded by some of his contemporaries in literary circles.
Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson judged Thoreau’s endorsement of living alone in natural simplicity, apart from modern society, to be a mark of effeminacy:
…Thoreau’s content and ecstasy in living was, we may say, like a plant that he had watered and tended with womanish solicitude; for there is apt to be something unmanly, something almost dastardly, in a life that does not move with dash and freedom, and that fears the bracing contact of the world. In one word, Thoreau was a skulker. .He did not wish virtue to go out of him among his fellow-men, but slunk into a corner to hoard it for himself.^ Why, then, did he go out of jail?
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I did not wish to take a cabin passage, but rather to go before the mast and on the deck of the world, for there I could best see the moonlight amid the mountains.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He loved to talk with all kinds and conditions of men if they had no hypocrisy or pretence about them, and though high in his standard of virtue, and most severe with himself, could be charitable to the failings of humble fellow-men.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

He left all for the sake of certain virtuous self-indulgences.[59]
Poet John Greenleaf Whittier detested what he deemed to be the message of Walden, decreeing that Thoreau wanted man to "lower himself to the level of a woodchuck and walk on four legs." He went further to castigate the work as "very wicked and heathenish", remarking "I prefer walking on two legs."[60]
In response to such criticisms, English novelist George Eliot, writing for the Westminster Review, characterized such critics as uninspired and narrow-minded:
People– very wise in their own eyes– who would have every man’s life ordered according to a particular pattern, and who are intolerant of every existence the utility of which is not palpable to them, may pooh-pooh Mr. Thoreau and this episode in his history, as unpractical and dreamy.[61]
Modern historian Richard Zacks pokes fun at Thoreau, writing:
.Thoreau's 'Walden, or Life in the Woods' deserves its status as a great American book but let it be known that Nature Boy went home on weekends to raid the family cookie jar.^ He lived for a time in Concord, near the Thoreaus, when a hunted slave came to the village by night to the home of that family.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I think he went down to Walden to pry into the arts of Nature and get something that wasn't open to the public.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In his books, particularly "Walden," the contentious tone may linger unpleasantly in the reader's ears and memory, but remember, Thoreau, in his day, was administering wholesome, if bitter, medicine.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.While living the simple life in the woods, Thoreau walked into nearby Concord, Mass., almost every day.^ Reynolds, and Mr. Staples, we felt as if a tripod upholding Concord's high standards and kindly, simple life had fallen.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ John Thoreau, senior, went into the pencil business on his return to Concord in 1823.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ They err entirely who suppose that he counselled every one to build hermitages in the woods, break with society and live on meal.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.And his mom, who lived less than two miles away, delivered goodie baskets filled with meals, pies and doughnuts every Saturday.^ They err entirely who suppose that he counselled every one to build hermitages in the woods, break with society and live on meal.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no more fatal blunderer than he who consumes the greater part of his life getting his living.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

.The more one reads in Thoreau's unpolished journal of his stay in the woods, the more his sojourn resembles suburban boys going to their tree-house in the backyard and pretending they're camping in the heart of the jungle.^ His mother found the little boy lying so one night, long after he had gone upstairs, and said, "Why, Henry dear, why don't you go to sleep?"
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ A little later Thoreau's family put his Journals into Mr. Emerson's hands for him to read.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1843, after he had lived more than a year with the Emersons, Thoreau went to Staten Island as tutor to one of Mr. William Emerson's sons for several months.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

[62]

Works

See also

References

  1. ^ Biography of Henry David Thoreau, American Poems (2000-2007 Gunnar Bengtsson).
  2. ^ a b Henry David Thoreau : A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers / Walden / The Maine Woods / Cape Cod, by Henry David Thoreau, Library of America, ISBN 0940450275
  3. ^ Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences, edited by Edwin Robert Anderson Seligman, Alvin Saunders Johnson, 1937, p. 12.
  4. ^ a b Thoreau, H. D. Resistance to Civil Government
  5. ^ Nelson, Randy F. The Almanac of American Letters. Los Altos, California: William Kaufmann, Inc., 1981: 51. ISBN 086576008X
  6. ^ Ancestors of Mary Ann Gillam and Stephen Old
  7. ^ History of the Fraternity System
  8. ^ Trivia-Library
  9. ^ Henry David Thoreau, Meet the Writers, Barnes & Noble.com
  10. ^ Biography of Henry David Thoreau, American Poems (2000-2007 Gunnar Bengtsson)
  11. ^ THUR-oh or Thor-OH? And How Do We Know? Thoreau Reader
  12. ^ Thoreau, H.D. Cape Cod
  13. ^ American Notebooks Nathaniel Hawthorne
  14. ^ Gilman, William, et al., The Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson 16 vols. (Cambridge, Mass 1960-)
  15. ^ "Thoreau's Diploma" American Literature Vol. 17, May 1945. 174-175.
  16. ^ Walter Harding, "Live Your Own Life", Geneseo Summer Compass, 4 June 1984. Accessed 2009-11-21.
  17. ^ a b c Robert Sattelmeyer, Thoreau's Reading: A Study in Intellectual History with bibliographical catalogue, Chapter 2, Princeton: Princeton University Press (1988).
  18. ^ Dean, Bradley P. "A Thoreau Chronology"
  19. ^ Woodlief, Ann "Henry David Thoreau"
  20. ^ "The Walden Woods Project".
  21. ^ a b c Cheever, Susan (2006). American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau; Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work. Detroit: Thorndike Press. Large print edition. p. 90. ISBN 078629521X.
  22. ^ Salt, H.S. (1890). The Life of Henry David Thoreau. London: Richard Bentley & Son. pp. p. 69. 
  23. ^ F. B. Sanborn (ed.), The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, VI, Familiar Letters, (Chapter 1, Years of Discipline) Boston: Houghton Mifflin & Co. (1906).
  24. ^ Conrad, Randall. (Fall 2005). "The Machine in the Wetland: Re-imagining Thoreau's Plumbago-Grinder". Thoreau Society Bulletin (253).
  25. ^ A Chronology of Thoreau's Life, with Events of the Times, The Thoreau Project, Calliope Film Resources, accessed 11 June 2007
  26. ^ Rosenwald, Lawrence. "The Theory, Practice & Influence of Thoreau's Civil Disobedience". William Cain, ed. A Historical Guide to Henry David Thoreau. Cambridge: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  27. ^ Thoreau, H. D. letter to Ralph Waldo Emerson February 23, 1848
  28. ^ Alcott, Bronson. Journals. Boston: Little, Brown, 1938.
  29. ^ http://www.morrissociety.org/JWMS/SP94.10.4.Nichols.pdf
  30. ^ Henry David Thoreau, "Autumnal Tints", The Atlantic Monthly (October 1862) pp. 385-402. (Reprint. Accessed 2009-11-21.)
  31. ^ Henry David Thoreau, The Annotated Walden (1970), Philip Van Doren Stern, ed., pp. 96, 132
  32. ^ John Aldrich Christie, Thoreau as World Traveler, Columbia University Press (1965)
  33. ^ Reynolds, David S. John Brown, Abolitionist Knopf (2005), p. 4
  34. ^ Simon Critchley, The Book of Dead Philosophers, p. 181, New York: Random House (2009).
  35. ^ The Writer's Almanac
  36. ^ Packer, Barbara L. The Transcendentalists. Athens, Georgia: The University of Georgia Press, 2007: 272. ISBN 9780820329581.
  37. ^ Emerson, Ralph Waldo Thoreau. The Atlantic August 1862.
  38. ^ Walden, or Life in the Woods (Chapter 1: “Economy”)
  39. ^ Brooks, Van Wyck. The Flowering of New England. New York: E. P. Dutton and Company, Inc., 1952. p. 310
  40. ^ a b Cheever, Susan (2006). American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau; Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work. Detroit: Thorndike Press. Large print edition. p. 241. ISBN 078629521X.
  41. ^ Maynard, W. Barksdale, Walden Pond: A History. Oxford University Press, 2005.(pg.265)
  42. ^ Mumford, Lewis, The Golden Day: A Study in American Experience and Culture. Boni and Liveright, 1926. (pgs. 56-9)
  43. ^ Posey, Alexander. Lost Creeks: Collected Journals. (Edited by Matthew Wynn Sivils) Univerisity of Nebraska Press, 2009. (pg. 38)
  44. ^ Saunders, Barry. A Complex Fate: Gustav Stickley and the Craftsman Movement. Preservation Press, 1996. (pg. 4)
  45. ^ Kifer, Ken Analysis and Notes on Walden: Henry Thoreau’s Text with Adjacent Thoreauvian Commentary
  46. ^ Hendrick, George and Oehlschlaeger,Fritz (eds.) Toward the Making of Thoreau's Modern Reputation, University of Illinois Press, 1979.
  47. ^ Miller, Webb. I Found No Peace. Garden City, 1938. 238-239
  48. ^ King, M.L. Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. chapter two
  49. ^ Skinner, B. F., A Matter of Consequences
  50. ^ Skinner, B. F., Walden Two (1948)
  51. ^ Burkholder, James Peter. Charles Ives and His World. Princeton University Press, 1996 (pgs. 50-1)
  52. ^ a b EL NATURISMO LIBERTARIO EN LA PENÍNSULA IBÉRICA (1890-1939) by Jose Maria Rosello
  53. ^ a b "Anarchism, Nudism, Naturism" by Carlos Ortega
  54. ^ a b c "LA INSUMISIÓN VOLUNTARIA. EL ANARQUISMO INDIVIDUALISTA ESPAÑOL DURANTE LA DICTADURA Y LA SEGUNDA REPÚBLICA (1923-1938)" by Xavier Diez
  55. ^ "Les anarchistes individualistes du début du siècle l'avaient bien compris, et intégraient le naturisme dans leurs préoccupations. Il est vraiment dommage que ce discours se soit peu à peu effacé, d'antan plus que nous assistons, en ce moment, à un retour en force du puritanisme (conservateur par essence).""Anarchisme et naturisme, aujourd'hui." by Cathy Ytak
  56. ^ Recension des articles de l'En-Dehors consacrés au naturisme et au nudisme
  57. ^ ["Anarchisme et naturisme au Portugal, dans les années 1920" in Les anarchistes du Portugal by João Freire]
  58. ^ 'Againts civilization: Readings and reflections' by [[John Zerzan (editor)]]
  59. ^ Stevenson, Robert Louis. "Henry David Thoreau: His Character and Opinions". Cornhill Magazine. June 1880.
  60. ^ Wagenknecht, Edward. John Greenleaf Whittier: A Portrait in Paradox. New York: Oxford University Press, 1967: 112.
  61. ^ The New England Quarterly, Vol. 6, No. 4 (Dec., 1933), pp. 733-746
  62. ^ Zacks, Richard. An Underground Education, Doubleday Publishing. 1997, p19.
  63. ^ The Landlord from Cornell University Library
  64. ^ A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers from Project Gutenberg
  65. ^ Aesthetic papers from the Internet Archive
  66. ^ Walking from Project Gutenberg
  67. ^ Wild Apples: The History of the Apple Tree from Project Gutenberg
  68. ^ Excursions from the Internet Archive
  69. ^ Life without Principle from Cornell University Library
  70. ^ Night and Moonlight from Cornell University Library
  71. ^ The Maine Woods from The Thoreau Reader
  72. ^ The Maine woods from The Internet Archive
  73. ^ Cape Cod from The Thoreau Reader
  74. ^ Letters to various persons from the Internet Archive
  75. ^ A Yankee in Canada, with Anti-slavery and reform papers from the Internet Archive
  76. ^ Summer: from the Journal of Henry D. Thoreau from the Internet Archive
  77. ^ Winter : from the Journal of Henry D. Thoreau from the Internet Archive
  78. ^ Autumn. From the Journal of Henry D. Thoreau from the Internet Archive
  79. ^ Familiar letters of Henry David Thoreau the Internet Archive
  80. ^ The first and last journeys of Thoreau : lately discovered among his unpublished journals and manuscripts Vol. 1 from the Internet Archive
  81. ^ The first and last journeys of Thoreau : lately discovered among his unpublished journals and manuscripts Vol. 2 from the Internet Archive
  82. ^ The Journal of Henry David Thoreau

Further reading

  • Bode, Carl. Best of Thoreau's Journals. Southern Illinois University Press. 1967.
  • Botkin, Daniel. No Man's Garden.
  • Dassow, Laura. .Seeing New Worlds: Henry David Thoreau and 19th Century Science.^ Henry David Thoreau , Journals, 1906 1842 entry .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Books by and about Henry David Thoreau Click this icon to engrave the quote on mugs, bookmarks, t-shirts and much more .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden; or, Life in the Woods (1854) .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    University of Wisconsin. 1995. ISBN 0299147444
  • Dean, Bradley P. ed., Letters to a Spiritual Seeker. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2004.
  • Harding, Walter. The Days of Henry Thoreau. Princeton University Press, 1982.
  • Hendrix, George. The Influence of Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience" on Gandhi's Satyagraha. The New England Quarterly. 1956.
  • Howarth, William. .The Book of Concord: Thoreau's Life as a Writer.^ His friend and companion, Edward Hoar, said to me, "With Thoreau's life something went out of Concord woods and fields and river that never will return.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Viking Press, 1982.
  • Myerson, Joel et al. .The Cambridge Companion to Henry David Thoreau.^ Henry David Thoreau , Journals, 1906 1842 entry .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Books by and about Henry David Thoreau Click this icon to engrave the quote on mugs, bookmarks, t-shirts and much more .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden; or, Life in the Woods (1854) .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    Cambridge University Press. 1995.
  • Nash, Roderick. .Henry David Thoreau, Philosopher.
  • Parrington, Vernon.^ Henry David Thoreau , Journals, 1906 1842 entry .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Books by and about Henry David Thoreau Click this icon to engrave the quote on mugs, bookmarks, t-shirts and much more .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden; or, Life in the Woods (1854) .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    Main Current in American Thought. V 2 online. 1927.
  • Petroski, Henry. H. D. Thoreau, Engineer. American Heritage of Invention and Technology, Vol. 5, No. .2, pp. 8–16.
  • Richardson, Robert D. Henry Thoreau: A Life of the Mind.^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden; or, Life in the Woods (1854) .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles. 1986. ISBN 0520063465
  • Tauber, Alfred I. .Henry David Thoreau and the Moral Agency of Knowing.^ David Henry Thoreau (his baptismal names were afterward transposed) was born in a farmhouse on the "Virginia Road," a mile and a half east of the village, July 12, 1817.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ HENRY DAVID THOREAU .
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau .
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    University of California, Berkeley. .2001. ISBN 0-520-23915-6
  • Thoreau, Henry David.^ Henry David Thoreau , Journals, 1906 1842 entry .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Books by and about Henry David Thoreau Click this icon to engrave the quote on mugs, bookmarks, t-shirts and much more .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden; or, Life in the Woods (1854) .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    A Week, Walden, The Maine Woods, Cape Cod (Robert F. Sayre, ed.) .(Library of America, 1985) ISBN 0940450275
  • Thoreau, Henry David.^ Henry David Thoreau , attributed .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden, ch.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden , 1854 .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    Collected Essays and Poems (Elizabeth Hall Witherell, ed.) .(Library of America, 2001) ISBN 9781883011956
  • Thoreau, Henry David.^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden, ch.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , Walden , 1854 .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Henry David Thoreau , attributed .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    The Price of Freedom: Excerpts from Thoreau’s Journals ISBN 9781434805522

External links

Texts
Manuscripts
Other links

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.
There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.
^ Who but the Evil One has cried "Whoa!"
  • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There are thousands hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.
  • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

~ Walden
Henry David Thoreau (12 July 18176 May 1862) was an American writer and philosopher; born David Henry Thoreau
See also: Walden

Contents

Sourced

.
I am a parcel of vain strivings tied
By a chance bond together...
  • I am a parcel of vain strivings tied
    By a chance bond together,

    Dangling this way and that, their links
    Were made so loose and wide,
    Methinks,
    For milder weather.^ I am a parcel of vain strivings tied By a chance bond together...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am a parcel of vain strivings tied By a chance bond together, Dangling this way and that, their links Were made so loose and wide, Methinks, For milder weather.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau--Poems 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "I am a parcel of vain strivings tied", st. Talk of mysteries!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

  • But now I see I was not plucked for naught,
    And after in life's vase
    Of glass set while I might survive,
    But by a kind hand brought
    Alive
    To a strange place.
    • "I am a parcel of vain strivings tied", st. 6 (1841)
Talk of mysteries! — .Think of our life in nature, — daily to be shown matter, to come in contact with it, — rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks!
  • Great God, I ask thee for no meaner pelf
    Than that I may not disappoint myself,
    That in my action I may soar as high
    As I can now discern with this clear eye.^ Great God, I ask thee for no meaner pelf Than that I may not disappoint myself, That in my action I may soar as high As I can now discern with this clear eye.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Great God, I ask for no meaner pelf Than that I may not disappoint myself, That in my action I may soar as high As I can now discern with this clear eye.
    • Thoreau--Poems 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Talk of mysteries!--Think of our life in nature,--daily to be shown matter, to come in contact with it,--rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks!
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

  • My books I'd fain cast off, I cannot read,
    'Twixt every page my thoughts go stray at large
    Down in the meadow, where is richer feed,
    And will not mind to hit their proper targe.
  • Here while I lie beneath this walnut bough,
    What care I for the Greeks or for Troy town,
    If juster battles are enacted now
    Between the ants upon this hummock's crown?
    • The Summer Rain, st. 3
  • Talk of mysteries! — .Think of our life in nature, — daily to be shown matter, to come in contact with it, — rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks!^ Talk of mysteries!--Think of our life in nature,--daily to be shown matter, to come in contact with it,--rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks!
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Think of our life in nature, — daily to be shown matter, to come in contact with it, — rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Think of our life in nature, - daily to be shown matter, to come in contact with it, - rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks!
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    The solid earth! the actual world! the common sense! Contact! Contact! Who are we? .where are we?
    • The Maine Woods, Ktaadn, Pt.^ The Maine Woods , Ktaadn , Pt.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ In August 1846, Thoreau briefly left Walden to make a trip to Mount Katahdin in Maine, a journey later recorded in “Ktaadn,” the first part of The Maine Woods .
      • Henry David Thoreau: CosimoBooks.com 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cosimobooks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ In August of 1846, Thoreau briefly left Walden to make a trip to Mount Katahdin in Maine, a journey later recorded in "Ktaadn," the first part of The Maine Woods .
      • yawiki.org entry for Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC yawiki.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      6 (1848)
.
It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants.
^ Slavery in Massachusetts It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

^ "It is not enough to be industrious, so are the ants.

.What are you industrious about?
  • The law will never make men free; it is men who have got to make the law free.^ What are you industrious about?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What are you industrious about?"

    ^ The law will never make a man free; it is men who have got to make the law free.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • The fate of the country does not depend on how you vote at the polls — the worst man is as strong as the best at that game; it does not depend on what kind of paper you drop into the ballot-box once a year, but on what kind of man you drop from your chamber into the street every morning.^ Slavery in Massachusetts (1854) The fate of the country does not depend on how you vote at the polls — the worst man is as strong as the best at that game; it does not depend on what kind of paper you drop into the ballot-box once a year, but on what kind of man you drop from your chamber into the street every morning.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The fate of the country does not depend on how you vote at the polls-the worst man is as strong as the best at that game; it does not depend on what kind of paper you drop into the ballot box once a year, but on what kind of man you drop from your chamber into the street every morning."

    ^ The fate of the country does not depend on how you vote at the polls - the worst man is as strong as the best at that game; it does not depend on what kind of paper you drop into the ballot-box once a year, but on what kind of man you drop from your chamber into the street every morning.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Slavery in Massachusetts
  • It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants.^ Slavery in Massachusetts It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "It is not enough to be industrious, so are the ants.

    What are you industrious about?
    • Letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857)
.
If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him ...
^ If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him ...
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857) If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him ...
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Small things for him symbolized great.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

he will be surrounded by grandeur.
.
  • Let me suggest a theme for you: to state to yourself precisely and completely what that walk over the mountains amounted to for you, — returning to this essay again and again, until you are satisfied that all that was important in your experience is in it.^ Hear him to a friend: Let me suggest a theme for you - to state to yourself precisely and completely what that walk over the mountains amounted to for you, returning to this essay again and again until you are satisfied that all that was important in your experience is in it.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.djmcadam.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let me suggest a theme for you: to state to yourself precisely and completely what that walk over the mountains amounted to for you, — returning to this essay again and again, until you are satisfied that all that was important in your experience is in it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let me suggest a theme for you: to state to yourself precisely and completely what that walk over the mountains amounted to for you, - returning to this essay again and again, until you are satisfied that all that was important in your experience is in it.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Give this good reason to yourself for having gone over the mountains, for mankind is ever going over a mountain.^ Give this good reason to yourself for having gone over the mountains, for mankind is ever going over a mountain.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thoreau cryptically insisted he was leaving the woods for as good a reason as hed gone there, saying nothing of Emersons just then departing for an extended visit to Europe, having asked Thoreau to be a houseguest during his absence.
    • 'The Significance of Being Frank' by Tom Foran Clark 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.bungalowshop.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Don't suppose that you can tell it precisely the first dozen times you try, but at 'em again, especially when, after a sufficient pause, you suspect that you are touching the heart or summit of the matter, reiterate your blows there, and account for the mountain to yourself.^ Don't suppose that you can tell it precisely the first dozen times you try, but at 'em again, especially when, after a sufficient pause, you suspect that you are touching the heart or summit of the matter, reiterate your blows there, and account for the mountain to yourself.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dont suppose that you can tell it precisely the first dozen times you try, but at em again; especially when, after a sufficient pause you suspect that you are touching the heart or summit of the matter, reiterate your blows there, and account for the mountain to yourself.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.djmcadam.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumbnail.

    .Not that the story need be long, but it will take a long while to make it short.
    • Letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857)
  • Men and boys are learning all kinds of trades but how to make men of themselves. They learn to make houses; but they are not so well housed, they are not so contented in their houses, as the woodchucks in their holes.^ They learn to make houses; but they are not so well housed, they are not so contented in their houses, as the woodchucks in their holes.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Men and boys are learning all kinds of trades but how to make men of themselves.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
    • Henry David Thoreau biography, information, news, links, pictures (pics) and products (author: ) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.popstarsplus.com [Source type: General]

    .What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?^ What's the use of a fine house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?"

    ^ "What's the use of a fine house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?"

    .If you cannot tolerate the planet that it is on?
    Grade the ground first.^ If you cannot tolerate the planet that it is on?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Grade the ground first.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What's the use of a fine house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him ...^ If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him ...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857) If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him ...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Small things for him symbolized great.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    he will be surrounded by grandeur.
    .He is in the condition of a healthy and hungry man, who says to himself, — How sweet this crust is!^ I come to it as a hungry man to a crust of bread."

    ^ The man who is dissatisfied with himself, what can he do?
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is in the condition of a healthy and hungry man, who says to himself, - How sweet this crust is!
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Letter to Harrison Blake (20 May 1860); published in Familiar Letters (1865)
  • You ask particularly after my health.^ Letter to Harrison Blake (20 May 1860); published in Familiar Letters (1865) You ask particularly after my health.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You ask particularly after my health.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thoreau first received a letter from Harrison Blake, an ex-minister (Unitarian) widower of Worcester, Massachusetts, in March of 1848.
    • Henry David Thoreau :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .I suppose that I have not many months to live; but, of course, I know nothing about it.^ I suppose that I have not many months to live; but, of course, I know nothing about it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I SUPPOSE that I have not many months to live, but of course know nothing about it.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.djmcadam.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Which is the best man to deal with — he who knows nothing about a subject, and, what is extremely rare, knows that he knows nothing, or he who really knows something about it, but thinks that he knows all?
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I may add that I am enjoying existence as much as ever, and regret nothing.
  • My life is like a stroll upon the beach,
    As near the ocean's edge as I can go.^ I may say that I am enjoying existence as much as ever, and regret nothing.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.djmcadam.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His last letter, to Myron Benton (31 March 1862) My life is like a stroll upon the beach, As near the ocean's edge as I can go.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "My life is like a stroll upon the beach, As near to the ocean's edge as I can go."

    .
    • The Fisher's Boy, Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.^ Inspiration , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The Fisher's Boy , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      (1833–1908). .An American Anthology, 1787–1900
  • Whate'er we leave to God, God does
    And blesses us.^ Work Quotes Add to Favorite List Whate'er we leave to God, God does and blesses us.

    ^ An American Anthology, 1787–1900 Whate'er we leave to God, God does And blesses us.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Whate'er we leave to God, God does And blesses us.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Inspiration, Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.^ Inspiration , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The Fisher's Boy , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      (1833–1908). .An American Anthology, 1787–1900
  • I hear beyond the range of sound,
    I see beyond the range of sight,
    New earths and skies and seas around,
    And in my day the sun doth pale his light.^ An American Anthology, 1787–1900 I hear beyond the range of sound, I see beyond the range of sight, New earths and skies and seas around, And in my day the sun doth pale his light.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I hear beyond the range of sound, I see beyond the range of sight, New earths and skies and seas around, And in my day the sun doth pale his light.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ By night star-veiling, and by day Darkening the light and blotting out the sun; Go thou my incense upward from this hearth, And ask the gods to pardon this clear flame.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Kosmix : Reference, Videos, Images, News, Shopping and more... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kosmix.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • Inspiration, Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.^ Inspiration , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The Fisher's Boy , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      (1833–1908). .An American Anthology, 1787–1900
  • She with one breath attunes the spheres,
    And also my poor human heart.^ An American Anthology, 1787–1900 She with one breath attunes the spheres, And also my poor human heart.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ She with one breath attunes the spheres, And also my poor human heart.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ An American Anthology, 1787–1900 I hear beyond the range of sound, I see beyond the range of sight, New earths and skies and seas around, And in my day the sun doth pale his light.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Inspiration, Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.^ Inspiration , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The Fisher's Boy , Edmund Clarence Stedman, ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      (1833–1908). An American Anthology, 1787–1900

Journals (1838-1859)

.
To listen with one ear to each summer sound, to behold with one eye each summer scene, our visual rays so to meet and mingle with the object as to be one bent and doubled...
  • Truth, Goodness, Beauty — those celestial thrins,
    Continually are born
    ; e'en now the Universe,
    With thousand throats, and eke with greener smiles,
    Its joy confesses at their recent birth.^ Truth, Goodness, Beauty - those celestial thrins, Continually are born; e'en now the Universe, With thousand throats, and eke with greener smiles, Its joy confesses at their recent birth.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Truth, Goodness, Beauty — those celestial thrins, Continually are born ; e'en now the Universe, With thousand throats, and eke with greener smiles, Its joy confesses at their recent birth.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To listen with one ear to each summer sound, to behold with one eye each summer scene, our visual rays so to meet and mingle with the object as to be one bent and doubled...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • June 14, 1838
  • Sphere Music — Some sounds seem to reverberate along the plain, and then settle to earth again like dust; such are Noise, Discord, Jargon.^ June 14, 1838 Sphere Music — Some sounds seem to reverberate along the plain, and then settle to earth again like dust; such are Noise, Discord, Jargon.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sphere Music - Some sounds seem to reverberate along the plain, and then settle to earth again like dust; such are Noise, Discord, Jargon.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Quiet (no audible sounds except natural sounds like birds and insects and wind in the leaves and such) is really scary for most people.
    • Thoreau House: A creative copy of of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond, 1845. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.4peaks.com [Source type: General]

    .But such only as spring heavenward, and I may catch from steeples and hilltops in their upward course, which are the more refined parts of the former, are the true sphere music — pure, unmixed music — in which no wail mingles.^ But such only as spring heavenward, and I may catch from steeples and hilltops in their upward course, which are the more refined parts of the former, are the true sphere music — pure, unmixed music — in which no wail mingles.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But such only as spring heavenward, and I may catch from steeples and hilltops in their upward course, which are the more refined parts of the former, are the true sphere music - pure, unmixed music - in which no wail mingles.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Sphere Music - Some sounds seem to reverberate along the plain, and then settle to earth again like dust; such are Noise, Discord, Jargon.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • August 5, 1838
  • That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another's.^ That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another's.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another s.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ August 5, 1838 That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another's.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .We see so much only as we possess.^ We see so much only as we possess.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    • June 22, 1839
.
You might as well think to go in pursuit of the rainbow, and embrace it on the next hill, as to embrace the whole of poetry even in thought.
  • Friends — They are like air bubbles on water, hastening to flow together.^ You might as well think to go in pursuit of the rainbow, and embrace it on the next hill, as to embrace the whole of poetry even in thought.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is worth going to see Where you might be.
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ June 22, 1839 You might as well think to go in pursuit of the rainbow, and embrace it on the next hill, as to embrace the whole of poetry even in thought.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .History tells of Orestes and Pylades, Damon and Pythias, but why should not we put to shame those old reserved worthies by a community of such?^ History tells of Orestes and Pylades, Damon and Pythias, but why should not we put to shame those old reserved worthies by a community of such?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such desperate enterprises?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And why should we want to visit such a place?

    .Constantly, as it were through a remote skylight, I have glimpses of a serene friendship-land, and know the better why brooks murmur and violets grow.^ Constantly, as it were through a remote skylight, I have glimpses of a serene friendship-land, and know the better why brooks murmur and violets grow.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .This conjunction of souls, like waves which met and break, subsides also backward over things, and gives all a fresh aspect.^ This conjunction of souls, like waves which met and break, subsides also backward over things, and gives all a fresh aspect.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The fibers of all things have their tension and are strained like the strings of an instrument.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Like all things I think that we, as a human society, need to strike that perfect balance between individualism and collectivism.
    • Thoreau does not approve discussion on Kongregate 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kongregate.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I would live henceforth with some gentle soul such a life as may be conceived, double for variety, single for harmony — two, only that we might admire at our oneness — one, because indivisible.^ I would live henceforth with some gentle soul such a life as may be conceived, double for variety, single for harmony - two, only that we might admire at our oneness - one, because indivisible.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such can live many lives; while a Thoreau can live but one, and that only with perpetual foresight.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.djmcadam.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I would live henceforth with some gentle soul such a life as may be conceived, double for variety, single for harmony — two, only that we might admire at our oneness — one, because indivisible.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Such community to be a pledge of holy living.^ Such community to be a pledge of holy living.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .How could aught unworthy be admitted into our society?^ How could aught unworthy be admitted into our society?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In this collection, he does something more--he asks the most troubling question of human existence: how shall we live our lives in a society that makes being human more and more difficult?
    • Sample Chapter for Thoreau, H.D.; Glick, W., ed.: The Higher Law: Thoreau on Civil Disobedience and Reform. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC press.princeton.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .To listen with one ear to each summer sound, to behold with one eye each summer scene, our visual rays so to meet and mingle with the object as to be one bent and doubled; with two tongues to be wearied, and thought to spring ceaselessly from a double fountain.^ To listen with one ear to each summer sound, to behold with one eye each summer scene, our visual rays so to meet and mingle with the object as to be one bent and doubled...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To listen with one ear to each summer sound, to behold with one eye each summer scene, our visual rays so to meet and mingle with the object as to be one bent and doubled; with two tongues to be wearied, and thought to spring ceaselessly from a double fountain.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I would live henceforth with some gentle soul such a life as may be conceived, double for variety, single for harmony - two, only that we might admire at our oneness - one, because indivisible.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • January 26, 1840
  • Poetry — No definition of poetry is adequate unless it be poetry itself. The most accurate analysis by the rarest wisdom is yet insufficient, and the poet will instantly prove it false by setting aside its requisitions.^ The most accurate analysis by the rarest wisdom is yet insufficient, and the poet will instantly prove it false by setting aside its requisitions.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Poetry - No definition of poetry is adequate unless it be poetry itself.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ January 26, 1840 Poetry — No definition of poetry is adequate unless it be poetry itself.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It is indeed all that we do not know.^ It is indeed all that we do not know.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .The poet does not need to see how meadows are something else than earth, grass, and water, but how they are thus much.^ The poet does not need to see how meadows are something else than earth, grass, and water, but how they are thus much.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They never consulted with books, and know and can tell much less than they have done.
    • The Pond in Winter -- from Walden by Henry Thoreau, with Notes and Analysis 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kenkifer.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I could not but smile to see how industriously they locked the door on my meditations, which followed them out again without let or hindrance, and they were really all that was dangerous.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Civil Disobedience - Henry David Thoreau - 2 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.real-debt-elimination.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .He does not need discover that potato blows are as beautiful as violets, as the farmer thinks, but only how good potato blows are.^ He does not need discover that potato blows are as beautiful as violets, as the farmer thinks, but only how good potato blows are.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The poet does not need to see how meadows are something else than earth, grass, and water, but how they are thus much.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perhaps we need only to know how his shores trend and his adjacent country or circumstances, to infer his depth and concealed bottom.
    • The Pond in Winter -- from Walden by Henry Thoreau, with Notes and Analysis 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kenkifer.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The poem is drawn out from under the feet of the poet, his whole weight has rested on this ground.^ The poem is drawn out from under the feet of the poet, his whole weight has rested on this ground.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus his moral ground is taken from under his feet.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Civil Disobedience - Henry David Thoreau - 2 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.real-debt-elimination.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .It has a logic more severe than the logician's.^ It has a logic more severe than the logician's.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He wanted to prove his point more by the example of his life than by logic.

    ^ In the deepest part there are several acres more level than almost any field which is exposed to the sun, wind, and plow.
    • The Pond in Winter -- from Walden by Henry Thoreau, with Notes and Analysis 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kenkifer.com [Source type: Original source]

    .You might as well think to go in pursuit of the rainbow, and embrace it on the next hill, as to embrace the whole of poetry even in thought.
    • January 26, 1840
  • Aeschylus had a clear eye for the commonest things.^ You might as well think to go in pursuit of the rainbow, and embrace it on the next hill, as to embrace the whole of poetry even in thought.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ January 26, 1840 Aeschylus had a clear eye for the commonest things.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is worth going to see Where you might be.
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

    .His genius was only an enlarged common sense.
    He adverts with chaste severity to all natural facts.^ "Uncommon sense, that sense which is common only to the wisest."

    ^ He adverts with chaste severity to all natural facts.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His genius was only an enlarged common sense.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .His sublimity is Greek sincerity and simpleness, naked wonder which mythology had not helped to explain...^ His sublimity is Greek sincerity and simpleness, naked wonder which mythology had not helped to explain...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Whatever the common eye sees at all and expresses as best it may, he sees uncommonly and describes with rare completeness.^ Whatever the common eye sees at all and expresses as best it may, he sees uncommonly and describes with rare completeness.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye may see for the hand, but not for the mind.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The best form of government where individualism can be freely expressed is a free republic(rule of law) where people can be individuals with a limited government that doesn’t breath down their necks all the time.
    • Thoreau does not approve discussion on Kongregate 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kongregate.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The multitude that thronged the theatre could no doubt go along with him to the end...^ The multitude that thronged the theatre could no doubt go along with him to the end...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I won't go into the motivating factors (money, repression), which only became clearer much later on, and no amount of pleading could change her mind.
    • Thoreau House: A creative copy of of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond, 1845. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.4peaks.com [Source type: General]

    ^ As he made no compromise with Time, Time kept out of his way, and only sighed at a distance because he could not overcome him.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .The social condition of genius is the same in all ages.^ The social condition of genius is the same in all ages.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Aeschylus was undoubtedly alone and without sympathy in his simple reverence for the mystery of the universe.^ Aeschylus was undoubtedly alone and without sympathy in his simple reverence for the mystery of the universe.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • January 29, 1840
  • An early morning walk is a blessing for the whole day.^ January 29, 1840 An early morning walk is a blessing for the whole day.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ An early morning walk is a blessing for the whole day.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "An early-morning walk is a blessing for the whole day."

    • April 20, 1840
.
Our life revolves unceasingly, but the centre is ever the same, and the wise will regard only the seasons of the soul.
  • Have no mean hours, but be grateful for every hour, and accept what it brings.^ April 20, 1840 Our life revolves unceasingly, but the centre is ever the same, and the wise will regard only the seasons of the soul.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Have no mean hours, but be grateful for every hour, and accept what it brings.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Our life revolves unceasingly, but the centre is ever the same, and the wise will regard only the seasons of the soul.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .The reality will make any sincere record respectable.
    No day will have been wholly misspent, if one sincere, thoughtful page has been written.^ No day will have been wholly misspent, if one sincere, thoughtful page has been written.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The reality will make any sincere record respectable.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One day it came into his mind to make a staff.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Let the daily tide leave some deposit on these pages, as it leaves sand and shells on the shore.^ Let the daily tide leave some deposit on these pages, as it leaves sand and shells on the shore.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .So much increase of terra firma.^ So much increase of terra firma.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    this may be a calendar of the ebbs and flows of the soul; and on these sheets as a beach, the waves may cast up pearls and seaweed. .
    • July 6, 1840
  • Who looks in the sun will see no light else; but also he will see no shadow.^ Who looks in the sun will see no light else; but also he will see no shadow.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ July 6, 1840 Who looks in the sun will see no light else; but also he will see no shadow.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I hear beyond the range of sound, I see beyond the range of sight, New earths and skies and seas around, And in my day the sun doth pale his light.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Our life revolves unceasingly, but the centre is ever the same, and the wise will regard only the seasons of the soul.
    • March 10, 1841
  • We are as much as we see. Faith is sight and knowledge.^ April 20, 1840 Our life revolves unceasingly, but the centre is ever the same, and the wise will regard only the seasons of the soul.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Our life revolves unceasingly, but the centre is ever the same, and the wise will regard only the seasons of the soul.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We see so much only as we possess.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .The hands only serve the eyes.^ The hands only serve the eyes.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • April 9, 1841
  • The Indian...stands free and unconstrained in Nature, is her inhabitant and not her guest, and wears her easily and gracefully.^ The Indian...stands free and unconstrained in Nature, is her inhabitant and not her guest, and wears her easily and gracefully.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ April 9, 1841 The Indian...stands free and unconstrained in Nature, is her inhabitant and not her guest, and wears her easily and gracefully.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But the civilized man has the habits of the house.^ But the civilized man has the habits of the house.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    His house is a prison.
    • April 26, 1841
.
For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.
  • It is a great art to saunter.
    • April 26, 1841
  • A slight sound at evening lifts me up by the ears, and makes life seem inexpressibly serene and grand.^ It is a great art to saunter.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it."

    ^ After December 6, 1845 For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It may be Uranus, or it may be in the shutter.^ It may be Uranus, or it may be in the shutter.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • July 10-12, 1841
  • We are apt to imagine that this hubbub of Philosophy, Literature, and Religion, which is heard in pulpits, lyceums, and parlors, vibrates through the universe, and is as catholic a sound as the creaking of the earth's axle.^ July 10-12, 1841 We are apt to imagine that this hubbub of Philosophy, Literature, and Religion, which is heard in pulpits, lyceums, and parlors, vibrates through the universe, and is as catholic a sound as the creaking of the earth's axle.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We are apt to imagine that this hubbub of Philosophy, Literature, and Religion, which is heard in pulpits, lyceums, and parlors, vibrates through the universe, and is as catholic a sound as the creaking of the earth's axle.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Borjesson, Gary, 1994, “A Sounding of Walden 's Philosophical Depth,” Philosophy and Literature , 18: 287–308.
    • Henry David Thoreau (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .But if a man sleeps soundly, he will forget it all between sunset and dawn.^ But if a man sleeps soundly, he will forget it all between sunset and dawn.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    • January 6, 1842
.
Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.
^ Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

^ January 6, 1842 Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He once wrote: "Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.
  • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.Atheism may comparatively be popular with God himself.
  • One cannot too soon forget his errors and misdemeanors.^ Atheism may comparatively be popular with God himself.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One cannot too soon forget his errors and misdemeanors.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .To dwell long upon them is to add to the offense.^ To dwell long upon them is to add to the offense.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Repentance and sorrow can only be displaced by something better, which is as free and original as if they had not been.^ Repentance and sorrow can only be displaced by something better, which is as free and original as if they had not been.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Therefore, though they should fall immediately, they had better aim at something high.

    ^ And as they live and rule only by their servility, and appealing to the worse, and not the better, nature of man, the people who read them are in the condition of the dog that returns to his vomit."

    .
    • January 9, 1842
  • And the cost of a thing it will be remembered is the amount of life it requires to be exchanged for it.^ The cost of a thing, says he, is THE AMOUNT OF WHAT I WILL CALL LIFE which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.djmcadam.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And the cost of a thing it will be remembered is the amount of life it requires to be exchanged for it.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long run.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • After December 6, 1845
  • For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.
    • After February 22, 1846
  • Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty.^ Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it."

    ^ After December 6, 1845 For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The obedient must be slaves.
    • 1847
  • Men go to a fire for entertainment. When I see how eagerly men will run to a fire, whether in warm or in cold weather, by day or by night, dragging an engine at their heels, I'm astonished to perceive how good a purpose the level of excitement is made to serve.^ The obedient must be slaves.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Men go to a fire for entertainment.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When I see how eagerly men will run to a fire, whether in warm or in cold weather, by day or by night, dragging an engine at their heels, I'm astonished to perceive how good a purpose the level of excitement is made to serve.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • June, 1850
  • And now, at half-past ten o'clock, I hear the cockerels crow in Hubbard's barns, and morning is already anticipated.^ And now, at half-past ten o'clock, I hear the cockerels crow in Hubbard's barns, and morning is already anticipated.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ June, 1850 And now, at half-past ten o'clock, I hear the cockerels crow in Hubbard's barns, and morning is already anticipated.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I could with an effort pardon the cockerels of Concord for crowing still, for they, perchance, had not been beaten that morning; but I could not excuse this rub-a-dub of the "trainers."
    • Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.framingham.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It is the feathered, wakeful thought in us that anticipates the following day.^ It is the feathered, wakeful thought in us that anticipates the following day.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    • July 11, 1851
.
The bluebird carries the sky on his back.
  • How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.
    • August 19, 1851
  • Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.^ Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live."

    .Atheism may comparatively be popular with God himself.
    • September 7, 1851
  • The bluebird carries the sky on his back.
    • April 3, 1852
  • The perception of beauty is a moral test.
    • June 21, 1852
  • The youth gets together his materials to build a bridge to the moon, or, perchance, a palace or temple on the earth, and, at length, the middle-aged man concludes to build a woodshed with them.^ June 21, 1852 The youth gets together his materials to build a bridge to the moon, or, perchance, a palace or temple on the earth, and, at length, the middle-aged man concludes to build a woodshed with them.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The perception of beauty is a moral test.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The youth gets together his materials to build a bridge to the moon, or, perchance, a palace or temple on the earth, and, at length, the middle-aged man concludes to build a woodshed with them."

    • July 14, 1852
.
Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand.
  • Every poet has trembled on the verge of science.^ July 14, 1852 Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand."

    .
    • July 18, 1852
  • Fire is the most tolerable third party.^ July 18, 1852 Fire is the most tolerable third party.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Fire is the most tolerable third party.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    • January 2, 1853
  • Some circumstantial evidence is very strong, as when you find a trout in the milk.
    • November 11, 1854
    • Referring to an 1849 dairyman's strike, during which there was suspicion of milk being watered down.
.
That man is richest whose pleasures are the cheapest.
  • Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand.
    • January 5, 1856
  • The same law that shapes the earth-star shapes the snow-star.^ "That man is rich whose pleasures are the cheapest."

    ^ Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ July 14, 1852 Nature is full of genius, full of the divinity; so that not a snowflake escapes its fashioning hand.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .As surely as the petals of a flower are fixed, each of these countless snow-stars comes whirling to earth...these glorious spangles, the sweeping of heaven's floor.^ As surely as the petals of a flower are fixed, each of these countless snow-stars comes whirling to earth...these glorious spangles, the sweeping of heaven's floor.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ January 5, 1856 The same law that shapes the earth-star shapes the snow-star.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The same law that shapes the earth-star shapes the snow-star.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • January 5, 1856
  • That man is richest whose pleasures are the cheapest.
    • March 11, 1856
  • This bird sees the white man come and the Indian withdraw, but it withdraws not.^ This bird sees the white man come and the Indian withdraw, but it withdraws not.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "That man is rich whose pleasures are the cheapest."

    ^ Reading Quotes Add to Favorite List That man is the richest whose pleasures are the cheapest.

    .Its untamed voice is still heard above the tinkling of the forge...^ Its untamed voice is still heard above the tinkling of the forge...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It remains to remind us of aboriginal nature.^ It remains to remind us of aboriginal nature.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The seed not only provides evidence that nature is filled with “creative genius” ( Journal , 1/5/56), but it also reminds us that a spark of divinity is present in each human being as well.
    • Henry David Thoreau (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • March 23, 1856
  • It is in vain to dream of a wildness distant from ourselves.^ It is in vain to dream of a wildness distant from ourselves.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ March 23, 1856 It is in vain to dream of a wildness distant from ourselves.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • August 30, 1856
.
Any fool can make a rule
And any fool will mind it.
  • If you are describing any occurrence...^ September 26, 1859 Any fool can make a rule And any fool will mind it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ August 30, 1856 Any fool can make a rule And any fool will mind it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    make two or more distinct reports at different times... .We discriminate at first only a few features, and we need to reconsider our experience from many points of view and in various moods in order to perceive the whole.^ We discriminate at first only a few features, and we need to reconsider our experience from many points of view and in various moods in order to perceive the whole.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The particular laws are as our points of view, as, to the traveller, a mountain outline varies with every step, and it has an infinite number of profiles, though absolutely but one form.
    • The Pond in Winter -- from Walden by Henry Thoreau, with Notes and Analysis 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kenkifer.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One of the things we then discover is that we are involved in a pluralistic universe, containing many different points of view other than our own.
    • Henry David Thoreau (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • March 24, 1857
  • The commonest and cheapest sounds, as the barking of a dog, produce the same effect on fresh and healthy ears that the rarest music does.^ March 24, 1857 The commonest and cheapest sounds, as the barking of a dog, produce the same effect on fresh and healthy ears that the rarest music does.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The commonest and cheapest sounds, as the barking of a dog, produce the same effect on fresh and healthy ears that the rarest music does.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It depends on your appetite for sound.^ It depends on your appetite for sound.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Just as a crust is sweeter to a healthy appetite than confectionery to a pampered or diseased one.^ Just as a crust is sweeter to a healthy appetite than confectionery to a pampered or diseased one.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • December 27, 1857
  • You must love the crust of the earth on which you dwell more than the sweet crust of any bread or cake; you must be able to extract nutriment out of a sand heap.^ You must get your living by loving.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You must love the crust of the earth on which you dwell more than the sweet crust of any bread or cake; you must be able to extract nutriment out of a sand heap.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is more lone than you can imagine."
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • January 25, 1858
  • The savage in man is never quite eradicated.^ The savage in man is never quite eradicated.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The savage in man is never quite eradicated."

    ^ January 25, 1858 The savage in man is never quite eradicated.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    • September 26, 1859
  • Any fool can make a rule
    And any fool will mind it.
    • February 3, 1860

Civil Disobedience (1849)

.
I heartily accept the motto, "That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.
  • If a thousand [citizens] were not to pay their tax-bills this year, that would not be a violent and bloody measure, as it would be to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.^ "I heartily accept the motto-"That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.

    ^ I heartily accept the motto, - "That government is best which governs least"[1]; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I heartily accept the motto, "That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .This is, in fact, the definition of a peaceable revolution, if any such is possible.
  • The soldier is applauded who refuses to serve in an unjust war by those who do not refuse to sustain the unjust government which makes the war; is applauded by those whose own act and authority he disregards and sets at naught; as if the state were penitent to that degree that it hired one to scourge it while it sinned, but not to that degree that it left off sinning for a moment.
  • I heartily accept the motto, "That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.^ I heartily accept the motto,That government is best which governs least; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "I heartily accept the motto-"That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.

    ^ The soldier is applauded who refuses to serve in an unjust war by those who do not refuse to sustain the unjust government which makes the war; is applauded by those whose own act and authority he disregards and sets at naught; as if the State were penitent to that degree that it hired one to scourge it while it sinned, but not to that degree that if left off sinning for a moment.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe — "That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.
.
A government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it...
  • To speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.^ But, to speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Transcendental Philosophy: Henry David Thoreau: Quotes on Civil Disobedience, Walden Pond. Thoreau Quotations, Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.spaceandmotion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it.
    After all, the practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest.^ "Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it."30 Majorities usually rule because they are the strongest physically; but their policies are based upon expediency.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why has every man a conscience then?"
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ After all, the practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest [4].
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.^ But a government in which the majority rule in all cases can not be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But a government in which the majority rule in all cases cannot be based on justice, even as far as men understand it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Can there not be a government in which majorities do not virtually decide right and wrong, but conscience?^ Since majority rule might be unjust, Thoreau asks, "Can there not be a government in which majorities do not virtually decide right and wrong, but conscience?
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Can there not be a government in which majorities do not virtually decide right and wrong, but conscience?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Can there not be a government in which the majorities do not virtually decide right and wrong, but conscience?
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]

    — in which majorities decide only those questions to which the rule of expediency is applicable? .Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator?^ Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau and 'Civil Disobedience' by Wendy McElroy 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.lewrockwell.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thoreau had written, "Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator?
    • Sample Chapter for Thoreau, H.D.; Glick, W., ed.: The Higher Law: Thoreau on Civil Disobedience and Reform. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC press.princeton.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator?

    .Why has every man a conscience, then?^ Why has every man a conscience then?"
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why has every man a conscience, then?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Sample Chapter for Thoreau, H.D.; Glick, W., ed.: The Higher Law: Thoreau on Civil Disobedience and Reform. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC press.princeton.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why has every man a conscience then?
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau and 'Civil Disobedience' by Wendy McElroy 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.lewrockwell.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Philosophy Professor | Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.philosophyprofessor.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward.^ I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterwards.

    ^ I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau and 'Civil Disobedience' by Wendy McElroy 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.lewrockwell.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward."
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.^ "It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right."
    • Sample Chapter for Thoreau, H.D.; Glick, W., ed.: The Higher Law: Thoreau on Civil Disobedience and Reform. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC press.princeton.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau and 'Civil Disobedience' by Wendy McElroy 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.lewrockwell.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Philosophy Professor | Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.philosophyprofessor.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .The only obligation which I have a right to assume is to do at any time what I think right.
    It is truly enough said that a corporation has no conscience; but a corporation of conscientious men is a corporation with a conscience.^ The only obligation which I have the right to assume, is to do at any time what I think right.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The only obligation which I have a right to assume, is to do at any time what I think right."31 But a corporation has no conscience, although conscientious people may be a corporation with a conscience.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The only obligation which I have a right to assume, is to do at any time what I think right.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]

    .Law never made men a whit more just; and, by means of their respect for it, even the well-disposed are daily made the agents of injustice.
  • How does it become a man to behave toward this American government today?^ The law will never make men free, it is men that have to make the law free.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Law never made men a whit more just.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Law never made men a whit more just; and, by means of their respect for it, even the well‑ disposed are daily made the agents of injustice.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .I answered that he cannot without disgrace be associated with it.
  • When a sixth of the population of a nation which has undertaken to be the refuge of liberty are slaves, and a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military law, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize.^ When a sixth of the population of a nation which has undertaken to be the refuge of liberty are slaves, and a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military law, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He lamented, "A sixth of the population of a nation which has undertaken to be the refuge of liberty are slaves."32 It has become a military state, and honest men ought to rebel.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I answered that he cannot without disgrace be associated with it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .What makes this duty the more urgent is the fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army.
  • A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority.^ What makes this duty the more urgent is that fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army.
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What makes his duty the more urgent is the fact, that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, not wish it to prevail through the power of the majority.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]

    .There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men.
    When the majority shall at length vote for the abolition of slavery, it will be because they are indifferent to slavery, or because there is but little slavery left to be abolished by their vote.^ When the majority shall at length vote for the abolition of slavery, it will be because they are indifferent to slavery, or because there is but little slavery left to be abolished by their vote.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau: On the Futility of Bush v. Kerry 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.counterpunch.org [Source type: General]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau: On the Futility of Bush v. Kerry 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.counterpunch.org [Source type: General]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He explained that nonresistants cannot work within a corrupt government because they cannot be for war, capital punishment, and slavery.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They will then be the only slaves.^ They will then be the only slaves.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau: On the Futility of Bush v. Kerry 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.counterpunch.org [Source type: General]

    ^ He criticized not only southern slave-owners but northern merchants and farmers, who care more about commerce and agriculture than they do about humanity.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    Only his vote can hasten the abolition of slavery who asserts his own freedom by his vote.
.
Any man more right than his neighbors constitutes a majority of one.
  • He who gives himself entirely to his fellow-men appears to them useless and selfish; but he who gives himself partially to them is pronounced a benefactor and philanthropist.
  • Unjust laws exist: shall we be content to obey them, or shall we endeavor to amend them, and obey them until we have succeeded, or shall we transgress them at once?
  • I came into this world, not chiefly to make this a good place to live in, but to live in it, be it good or bad.
  • Any man more right than his neighbors constitutes a majority of one.
  • Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison...^ One day it came into his mind to make a staff.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is not many moments that I live under a government, even in this world.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    the only house in a slave State in which a free man can abide with honor.
  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.
.
There will never be a really free and enlightened State until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly.
  • I am as desirous of being a good neighbor as I am of being a bad subject.
  • They who know of no purer sources of truth, who have traced up its stream no higher, stand, and wisely stand, by the Bible and the Constitution, and drink at it there with reverence and humility; but they who behold where it comes trickling into this lake or that pool, gird up their loins once more, and continue their pilgrimage toward its fountain-head.
  • No man with a genius for legislation has appeared in America.^ There will never be a really free and enlightened State,” he argues, “until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly” (“Civil Disobedience”).
    • Henry David Thoreau (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ He knows no change who knows the true .
    • Internet Archive: Free Download: Henry David Thoreau - Selected Poetry and Prose 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: General]

    ^ No man with a genius for legislation has appeared in America.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .They are rare in the history of the world.^ They are rare in the history of the world.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    There are orators, politicians, and eloquent men, by the thousand; but the speaker has not yet opened his mouth to speak who is capable of settling the much-vexed questions of the day.
  • For eighteen hundred years, though perchance I have no right to say it, the New Testament has been written; yet where is the legislator who has wisdom and practical talent enough to avail himself of the light which it sheds on the science of legislation?
.
A State which bore this kind of fruit, and suffered it to drop off as fast as it ripened, would prepare the way for a still more perfect and glorious State, which also I have imagined, but not yet anywhere seen.
  • A very few, as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the great sense, and men, serve the State with their consciences also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part; and they are commonly treated by it as enemies.
  • The progress from an absolute to a limited monarchy, from a limited monarchy to a democracy, is a progress toward a true respect for the individual.
  • We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us.
  • Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government?^ The progress from an absolute to a limited monarchy, from a limited monarchy to a democracy, is a progress toward a true respect for the individual.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A few, reformers and martyrs, serve the state with their consciences also, but they are usually treated as enemies.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Is a democracy such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]

    .Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man?^ Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man?"

    ^ But, gentlemen, a man whose private conscience leads him to disobey a law recognized by the community must take the consequences of that disobedience.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .There will never be a really free and enlightened State until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly.
    I please myself with imagining a State at least which can afford to be just to all men, and to treat the individual with respect as a neighbor; which even would not think it inconsistent with its own repose if a few were to live aloof from it, not meddling with it, nor embraced by it, who fulfilled all the duties of neighbors and fellow-men.^ There will never be a really free and enlightened State,” he argues, “until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly” (“Civil Disobedience”).
    • Henry David Thoreau (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I please myself with imagining a State at least which can afford to be just to all men, and to treat the individual with respect as a neighbor; which even would not think it inconsistent with its own repose if a few were to live aloof from it, not meddling with it, nor embraced by it, who fulfilled all the duties of neighbors and fellow-men.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There will never be a really free and enlightened State, until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived, and treats him accordingly.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]

    A State which bore this kind of fruit, and suffered it to drop off as fast as it ripened, would prepare the way for a still more perfect and glorious State, which also I have imagined, but not yet anywhere seen.
    • Final lines

A Week on the Concord and Marrimack Rivers (1849)

.
To some extent, mythology is only the most ancient history and biography.
^ To some extent, mythology is only the most ancient history and biography.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Perchance, when, in the course of ages, American liberty has become a fiction of the past--as it is to some extent a fiction of the present--the poets of the world will be inspired by American mythology.
  • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Perchance, when, in the course of ages, American liberty has become a fiction of the past — as it is to some extent a fiction of the present — the poets of the world will be inspired by American mythology.
  • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

.So far from being false or fabulous in the common sense, it contains only enduring and essential truth...
  • To some extent, mythology is only the most ancient history and biography.^ So far from being false or fabulous in the common sense, it contains only enduring and essential truth...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To some extent, mythology is only the most ancient history and biography.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Uncommon sense, that sense which is common only to the wisest."

    .So far from being false or fabulous in the common sense, it contains only enduring and essential truth, the I and you, the here and there, the now and then, being omitted.
    Either time or rare wisdom writes it.^ So far from being false or fabulous in the common sense, it contains only enduring and essential truth...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Either time or rare wisdom writes it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So far from being false or fabulous in the common sense, it contains only enduring and essential truth, the I and you, the here and there, the now and then, being omitted.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Before printing was discovered, a century was equal to a thousand years.^ Before printing was discovered, a century was equal to a thousand years.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    The poet is he who can write some pure mythology to-day without the aid of posterity
.
In the mythus a superhuman intelligence uses the unconscious thoughts and dreams of men as its hieroglyphics to address men unborn.
  • The hidden significance of these fables which is sometimes thought to have been detected, the ethics running parallel to the poetry and history, are not so remarkable as the readiness with which they may be made to express a variety of truths. As if they were the skeletons of still older and more universal truths than any whose flesh and blood they are for the time made to wear.^ As if they were the skeletons of still older and more universal truths than any whose flesh and blood they are for the time made to wear.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The poet is he who can write some pure mythology to-day without the aid of posterity The hidden significance of these fables which is sometimes thought to have been detected, the ethics running parallel to the poetry and history, are not so remarkable as the readiness with which they may be made to express a variety of truths.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the mythus a superhuman intelligence uses the unconscious thoughts and dreams of men as its hieroglyphics to address men unborn.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It is like striving to make the sun, or the wind, or the sea symbols to signify exclusively the particular thoughts of our day.^ It is like striving to make the sun, or the wind, or the sea symbols to signify exclusively the particular thoughts of our day.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I hear beyond the range of sound, I see beyond the range of sight, New earths and skies and seas around, And in my day the sun doth pale his light.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If I were confined to a comer of a garret all my days, like a spider, the world would be just as large to me while I had my thoughts about me.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    But what signifies it? .In the mythus a superhuman intelligence uses the unconscious thoughts and dreams of men as its hieroglyphics to address men unborn.^ In the mythus a superhuman intelligence uses the unconscious thoughts and dreams of men as its hieroglyphics to address men unborn.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    In the history of the human mind, these glowing and ruddy fables precede the noonday thoughts of men, as Aurora the sun's rays.
    The matutine intellect of the poet, keeping in advance of the glare of philosophy, always dwells in this auroral atmosphere.
.
You can hardly convince a man of an error in a lifetime, but must content yourself with the reflection that the progress of science is slow.
^ You can hardly convince a man of an error in a lifetime, but must content yourself with the reflection that the progress of science is slow.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

^ If you would convince a man that he does wrong, do right.
  • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment."

.If he is not convinced, his grandchildren may be.
  • You can hardly convince a man of an error in a lifetime, but must content yourself with the reflection that the progress of science is slow.^ If he is not convinced, his grandchildren may be.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You can hardly convince a man of an error in a lifetime, but must content yourself with the reflection that the progress of science is slow.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You may cheat yourself out of much life so.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.famousquotesandauthors.com [Source type: General]
    • Philosophy Professor | Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.philosophyprofessor.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    If he is not convinced, his grandchildren may be.
.
The great god Pan is not dead, as was rumored.
^ In my Pantheon, Pan still reigns in his pristine glory, with his ruddy face, his flowing beard, and his shaggy body, his pipe and his crook, his nymph Echo, and his chosen daughter Iambe; for the great god Pan is not dead, as was rumored.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

.No god ever dies.^ No god ever dies.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

.Perhaps of all the gods of New England and of ancient Greece, I am most constant at his shrine.
  • I am not sure but I should betake myself in extremities to the liberal divinities of Greece, rather than to my country's God.^ I am not sure but I should betake myself in extremities to the liberal divinities of Greece, rather than to my country's God.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perhaps of all the gods of New England and of ancient Greece, I am most constant at his shrine.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Monday , Though All the Fates Should Prove Unkind , st. Far from New England's blustering shore, New England's worm her hulk shall bore, And sink her in the Indian seas, Twine, wine, and hides, and China teas.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Jehovah, though with us he has acquired new attributes, is more absolute and unapproachable, but hardly more divine, than Jove.^ Jehovah, though with us he has acquired new attributes, is more absolute and unapproachable, but hardly more divine, than Jove.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jehovah , though with us he has acquired new attributes, is more absolute and unapproachable, but hardly more divine, than Jove .
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We must learn to admire the heroes of conscience, human rights, the martyrs for peace and freedom more than the false attributes of military courage.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He is not so much of a gentleman, not so gracious and catholic, he does not exert so intimate and genial an influence on nature, as many a god of the Greeks.
  • The Grecian are youthful and erring and fallen gods, with the vices of men, but in many important respects essentially of the divine race.^ The Grecian are youthful and erring and fallen gods, with the vices of men, but in many important respects essentially of the divine race.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is not so much of a gentleman, not so gracious and catholic, he does not exert so intimate and genial an influence on nature, as many a god of the Greeks.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Work Quotes Add to Favorite List Whate'er we leave to God, God does and blesses us.

    .In my Pantheon, Pan still reigns in his pristine glory, with his ruddy face, his flowing beard, and his shaggy body, his pipe and his crook, his nymph Echo, and his chosen daughter Iambe; for the great god Pan is not dead, as was rumored.^ In my Pantheon, Pan still reigns in his pristine glory, with his ruddy face, his flowing beard, and his shaggy body, his pipe and his crook, his nymph Echo, and his chosen daughter Iambe; for the great god Pan is not dead, as was rumored.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The great god Pan is not dead, as was rumored.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .No god ever dies.^ No god ever dies.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Perhaps of all the gods of New England and of ancient Greece, I am most constant at his shrine.
  • It seems to me that the god that is commonly worshipped in civilized countries is not at all divine, though he bears a divine name, but is the overwhelming authority and respectability of mankind combined.^ It seems to me that the god that is commonly worshipped in civilized countries is not at all divine, though he bears a divine name, but is the overwhelming authority and respectability of mankind combined.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Perhaps of all the gods of New England and of ancient Greece, I am most constant at his shrine.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Monday , Though All the Fates Should Prove Unkind , st. Far from New England's blustering shore, New England's worm her hulk shall bore, And sink her in the Indian seas, Twine, wine, and hides, and China teas.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Men reverence one another, not yet God. If I thought that I could speak with discrimination and impartiality of the nations of Christendom, I should praise them, but it tasks me too much.^ If I thought that I could speak with discrimination and impartiality of the nations of Christendom, I should praise them, but it tasks me too much.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Men reverence one another, not yet God.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "God could not be unkind to me if he should try."

    .They seem to be the most civil and humane, but I may be mistaken.
  • There are various, nay, incredible faiths; why should we be alarmed at any of them?^ They seem to be the most civil and humane, but I may be mistaken.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are various, nay, incredible faiths; why should we be alarmed at any of them?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ After all, the practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .What man believes, God believes.
  • I trust that some may be as near and dear to Buddha, or Christ, or Swedenborg, who are without the pale of their churches. It is necessary not to be Christian to appreciate the beauty and significance of the life of Christ.^ It is necessary not to be Christian to appreciate the beauty and significance of the life of Christ.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I trust that some may be as near and dear to Buddha, or Christ, or Swedenborg, who are without the pale of their churches.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What man believes, God believes.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I know that some will have hard thoughts of me, when they hear their Christ named beside my Buddha, yet I am sure that I am willing they should love their Christ more than my Buddha, for the love is the main thing, and I like him too.
  • The wisest man preaches no doctrines; he has no scheme; he sees no rafter, not even a cobweb, against the heavens.^ There is no remedy for love but to love more.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.jittery.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Famous Quotations. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.cognitivedistortion.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is not my business to be petitioning the governor or the legislature any more than it is theirs to petition me; and, if they should not hear my petition, what should I do then?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "There is no remedy for love but to love more."
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]

    It is clear sky. .If I ever see more clearly at one time than at another, the medium through which I see is clearer.
  • Have you learned the alphabet of heaven and can count three?^ Have you learned the alphabet of heaven and can count three?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If I ever see more clearly at one time than at another, the medium through which I see is clearer.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The abolitionist Elijah P. Lovejoy was driven out of Missouri and went to Alton, Illinois, where mobs destroyed his printing press three times and invaded his house more than that, driving his wife to distraction.
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Do you know the number of God's family?^ Do you know the number of God's family?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Can you put mysteries into words?^ Can you put mysteries into words?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You do not put your head into the fire.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Thoreau: Civil Disobedience (DL SunSITE) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC sunsite.berkeley.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Do you presume to fable of the ineffable?^ Do you presume to fable of the ineffable?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Pray, what geographer are you, that speak of heaven's topography?^ Pray, what geographer are you, that speak of heaven's topography?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Whose friend are you that speak of God's personality?^ Whose friend are you that speak of God's personality?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ... .Tell me of the height of the mountains of the moon, or of the diameter of space, and I may believe you, but of the secret history of the Almighty, and I shall pronounce thee mad.
  • Some old poet's grand imagination is imposed on us as adamantine everlasting truth, and God's own word!^ Some old poet's grand imagination is imposed on us as adamantine everlasting truth, and God's own word!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Tell me of the height of the mountains of the moon, or of the diameter of space, and I may believe you, but of the secret history of the Almighty, and I shall pronounce thee mad.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The poet is he who can write some pure mythology to-day without the aid of posterity The hidden significance of these fables which is sometimes thought to have been detected, the ethics running parallel to the poetry and history, are not so remarkable as the readiness with which they may be made to express a variety of truths.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    Pythagoras says, truly enough, "A true assertion respecting God, is an assertion of God"; but we may well doubt if there is any example of this in literature.
.
It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the universal favor with which the New Testament is outwardly received, and even the bigotry with which it is defended, there is no hospitality shown to, there is no appreciation of, the order of truth with which it deals.
  • The New Testament is an invaluable book, though I confess to having been slightly prejudiced against it in my very early days by the church and the Sabbath school, so that it seemed, before I read it, to be the yellowest book in the catalogue.^ The New Testament is an invaluable book, though I confess to having been slightly prejudiced against it in my very early days by the church and the Sabbath school, so that it seemed, before I read it, to be the yellowest book in the catalogue.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the universal favor with which the New Testament is outwardly received, and even the bigotry with which it is defended, there is no hospitality shown to, there is no appreciation of, the order of truth with which it deals.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For eighteen hundred years, though perchance I have no right to say it, the New Testament has been written; yet where is the legislator who has wisdom and practical talent enough to avail himself of the light which it sheds on the science of legislation?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Yet I early escaped from their meshes.^ Yet I early escaped from their meshes.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It was hard to get the commentaries out of one's head and taste its true flavor.^ It was hard to get the commentaries out of one's head and taste its true flavor.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Punning on "Sainte Terre," or the Holy Land, Thoreau claims that the true "saunterer" is not one who goes out from his home to seek the Holy Land but one who is at home everywhere and knows that all the land is holy.
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .I think that Pilgrim's Progress is the best sermon which has been preached from this text; almost all other sermons that I have heard, or heard of, have been but poor imitations of this.^ I think that Pilgrim's Progress is the best sermon which has been preached from this text; almost all other sermons that I have heard, or heard of, have been but poor imitations of this.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I think his fancy for referring everything to the meridian of Concord did not grow out of any ignorance or depreciation of other longitudes or latitudes, but was rather a playful expression of his conviction of the indifferency of all places, and that the best place for each is where he stands.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Which is the best man to deal with — he who knows nothing about a subject, and, what is extremely rare, knows that he knows nothing, or he who really knows something about it, but thinks that he knows all?
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It would be a poor story to be prejudiced against the Life of Christ because the book has been edited by Christians.
  • It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the universal favor with which the New Testament is outwardly received, and even the bigotry with which it is defended, there is no hospitality shown to, there is no appreciation of, the order of truth with which it deals.
  • It would be worthy of the age to print together the collected Scriptures or Sacred Writings of the several nations, the Chinese, the Hindoos, the Persians, the Hebrews, and others, as the Scripture of mankind. The New Testament is still, perhaps, too much on the lips and in the hearts of men to be called a Scripture in this sense.^ There is no other land; there is no other life but this.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It would be worthy of the age to print together the collected Scriptures or Sacred Writings of the several nations, the Chinese, the Hindoos, the Persians, the Hebrews, and others, as the Scripture of mankind.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is necessary not to be Christian to appreciate the beauty and significance of the life of Christ.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Such a juxtaposition and comparison might help to liberalize the faith of men.^ Such a juxtaposition and comparison might help to liberalize the faith of men.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .This is a work which Time will surely edit, reserved to crown the labors of the printing-press.^ This is a work which Time will surely edit, reserved to crown the labors of the printing-press.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .This would be the Bible, or Book of Books, which let the missionaries carry to the uttermost parts of the earth.
  • The vessel, though her masts be firm,
    Beneath her copper bears a worm.^ This would be the Bible, or Book of Books, which let the missionaries carry to the uttermost parts of the earth.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The vessel, though her masts be firm, Beneath her copper bears a worm.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The back of the book carried the notice that a second book, Walden; or, Life in the Woods , would soon follow.
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • Monday, Though All the Fates Should Prove Unkind, st. 2
  • Far from New England's blustering shore,
    New England's worm her hulk shall bore,
    And sink her in the Indian seas,
    Twine, wine, and hides, and China teas.
    • Monday, Though All the Fates Should Prove Unkind, st. 2
  • My life has been the poem I would have writ,
    But I could not both live and utter it.
    • My Life Has Been a Poem I Would Have Writ

Wednesday

.
Dreams are the touchstones of our characters.
  • It would be worth the while to look closely into the eye which has been open and seeing at such hours, and in such solitudes, its dull, yellowish, greenish eye.^ Dreams are the touchstones of our character.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dreams are the touchstones of our characters.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Dreams are the touchstones of our characters.

    .Methinks my own soul must be a bright invisible green.
  • It takes two to speak the truth, — one to speak, and another to hear.
  • Even the death of Friends will inspire us as much as their lives.^ Methinks my own soul must be a bright invisible green.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Methinks my own soul must be a bright invisible green."

    ^ Even the death of Friends will inspire us as much as their lives.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    They will leave consolation to the mourners, as the rich leave money to defray the expenses of their funerals, and their memories will be incrusted over with sublime and pleasing thoughts, as monuments of other men are overgrown with moss; for our Friends have no place in the graveyard.
  • This world is but canvas to our imaginations.
  • Dreams are the touchstones of our characters.

Thursday

The unconsciousness of man is the consciousness of God.
  • Go where we will on the surface of things, men have been there before us.
  • The frontiers are not east or west, north or south, but wherever a man fronts a fact, though that fact be his neighbor, there is an unsettled wilderness between him and Canada, between him and the setting sun, or, farther still, between him and it.
  • A true account of the actual is the rarest poetry, for common sense always takes a hasty and superficial view.
  • Poetry is the mysticism of mankind.
  • A poem is one undivided unimpeded expression fallen ripe into literature, and it is undividedly and unimpededly received by those for whom it was matured.
  • If you can speak what you will never hear, if you can write what you will never read, you have done rare things.
  • The unconsciousness of man is the consciousness of God.

Friday

  • As if our birth had at first sundered things, and we had been thrust up through into nature like a wedge, and not till the wound heals and the scar disappears, do we begin to discover where we are, and that nature is one and continuous everywhere.
  • What are the earth and all its interests beside the deep surmise which pierces and scatters them?
  • It is so rare to meet with a man out-doors who cherishes a worthy thought in his mind, which is independent of the labor of his hands.
  • The eye may see for the hand, but not for the mind.

Walden (1854)

These are just a few samples, for more quotes from this work see: Walden.
.
Only that day dawns to which we are awake.
^ Only that day dawns to which we are awake.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ "Only that day dawns to which we are awake."

^ This Moment Quotes Add to Favorite List Only that day dawns to which we are awake.

.There is more day to dawn.^ There is more day to dawn.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

^ More day to dawn; the story of Thoreau of Concord, by Harry Lee, with a foreword by Brooks Atkinson.

^ There is a moment in the dawn when the darkness of the night is dissipated, and before the exhalations of the day begin to rise, when we see all things more truly than at any other time."

.The sun is but a morning star.
  • The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. What is called resignation is confirmed desperation.
  • There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root, and it may be that he who bestows the largest amount of time and money on the needy is doing the most by his mode of life to produce that misery which he strives in vain to relieve.
  • Simplify, simplify.
  • A living dog is better than a dead lion. Shall a man go and hang himself because he belongs to the race of pygmies, and not be the biggest pygmy that he can?^ Who but the Evil One has cried "Whoa!"
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.

    ^ Shall a man go and hang himself because he belongs to the race of pygmies, and not be the biggest pygmy that he can?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.^ Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Let everyone mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made."
    • Epinions.com - henry_thoreau's profile 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.epinions.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Hosmer wrote to me as follows: -- "Every one in that school had their duties assigned, as on a Cunard steamer, and did their own part.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such desperate enterprises?^ Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such desperate enterprises?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed, and in such desperate enterprises?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed, and in such desperate enterprises?

    .If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.^ Epictetus Sayings of Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
    • Epinions.com - henry_thoreau's profile 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.epinions.com [Source type: General]

    ^ If a man loses pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He writes in his Journal: "If I do not keep step with others, it is because I hear a different drummer.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
  • ...men remain in their present low and primitive condition; but if they should feel the influence of the spring of springs arousing them, they would of necessity rise to a higher and more ethereal life.
  • Only that day dawns to which we are awake.^ Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let a man step to the music which he hears, however measured, and however far away."
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The pleasure we feel in music springs from the obedience which is in it.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .There is more day to dawn.^ There is more day to dawn.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ More day to dawn; the story of Thoreau of Concord, by Harry Lee, with a foreword by Brooks Atkinson.

    ^ There is a moment in the dawn when the darkness of the night is dissipated, and before the exhalations of the day begin to rise, when we see all things more truly than at any other time."

    .The sun is but a morning star.
  • Money is not required to buy one necessary of the soul.
  • If I knew for a certainty that a man was coming to my house with the conscious design of doing me good, I should run for my life.
  • Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things.^ As for doing good; that is one of the professions which is full.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The sun is but a morning star.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Money is not required to buy one necessity] of the soul."

    .They are but improved means to an unimproved end
    , an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at.
  • If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours ...^ They are but improved means to an unimproved end, an end which it was already but too easy to arrive at.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Live the life you've dreamed.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They are but improved means to an unimproved end.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty poverty, nor weakness weakness.
    • Commonly misquoted, converted to imperative mood, as "Go confidently in the direction of your dreams!^ In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty poverty, nor weakness weakness.
      • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
      • HENRY DAVID THOREAU 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC departments.ozarks.edu [Source type: Original source]
      • Philosophy Professor | Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.philosophyprofessor.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler; solitude will not be solitude, poverty will not be poverty, nor weakness weakness.
      • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
      • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Commonly misquoted, converted to imperative mood, as "Go confidently in the direction of your dreams!
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .Live the life you've imagined.^ Live the life you've dreamed.
      • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Live the life you have imagined.
      • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
      • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Are we not always living the life that we imagine we are?
      • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

      .As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler."
  • I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practise resignation, unless it was quite necessary.^ You must get your living by loving.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler; solitude will not be solitude, poverty will not be poverty, nor weakness weakness.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Live the life you've dreamed.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan- like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion. For most men, it appears to me, are in a strange uncertainty about it, whether it is of the devil or of God, and have somewhat hastily concluded that it is the chief end of man here to "glorify God and enjoy him forever."

A Plea for Captain John Brown (1859)

.
I hear many condemn these men because they were so few.
^ I hear many condemn these men because they were so few.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Indeed, the life of cattle, like that of many men, is but a sort of locomotiveness; they move a side at a time, and man, by his machinery, is meeting the horse and the ox halfway.
  • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They are the stock holders in these banks, and I hear them creaking their content."

.When were the good and the brave ever in a majority?
  • I do not wish to force my thoughts upon you, but I feel forced myself.^ When were the good and the brave ever in a majority?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not wish to force my thoughts upon you, but I feel forced myself.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not wish to quarrel with any man or nation, I do not wish to split hairs, to make fine distinctions, or set myself up as better than my neighbors.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]

    .Little as I know of Captain Brown, I would fain do my part to correct the tone and the statements of the newspapers, and of my countrymen generally, respecting his character and actions.^ Little as I know of Captain Brown, I would fain do my part to correct the tone and the statements of the newspapers, and of my countrymen generally, respecting his character and actions.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "My Journal is that of me which would else spill over and run to waste, gleanings from the field which in action I reap.

    ^ In my walks I would fain return to my senses.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It costs us nothing to be just.^ It costs us nothing to be just.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .We can at least express our sympathy with, and admiration of, him and his companions, and that is what I now propose to do.
  • He would have left a Greek accent slanting the wrong way, and righted up a falling man.
  • I hear many condemn these men because they were so few.^ He would have left a Greek accent slanting the wrong way, and righted up a falling man.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I hear many condemn these men because they were so few.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because they would not keep him there.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .When were the good and the brave ever in a majority?
    Would you have had him wait till that time came?^ When were the good and the brave ever in a majority?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Would you have had him wait till that time came?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Though short in stature, and inconspicuous in dress, you would not fail to notice him in the street, as more than ordinary."
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    — till you and I came over to him? .The very fact that he had no rabble or troop of hirelings about him would alone distinguish him from ordinary heroes.^ The very fact that he had no rabble or troop of hirelings about him would alone distinguish him from ordinary heroes.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We might remind him of his own words about love: We should have no reserve; we should give the whole of ourselves to that business.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.djmcadam.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There can be no very black melancholy to him who lives in the midst of nature and has his senses still.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .His company was small indeed, because few could be found worthy to pass muster.^ His company was small indeed, because few could be found worthy to pass muster.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Each one who there laid down his life for the poor and oppressed was a picked man, culled out of many thousands, if not millions; apparently a man of principle, of rare courage, and devoted humanity; ready to sacrifice his life at any moment for the benefit of his fellow-man.
  • It was his peculiar doctrine that a man has a perfect right to interfere by force with the slaveholder, in order to rescue the slave.^ It is for want of a man that there are so many men.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was his peculiar doctrine that a man has a perfect right to interfere by force with the slaveholder, in order to rescue the slave.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Each one who there laid down his life for the poor and oppressed was a picked man, culled out of many thousands, if not millions; apparently a man of principle, of rare courage, and devoted humanity; ready to sacrifice his life at any moment for the benefit of his fellow-man.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I agree with him.
    They who are continually shocked by slavery have some right to be shocked by the violent death of the slaveholder, but no others.
  • I speak for the slave when I say that I prefer the philanthropy of Captain Brown to that philanthropy which neither shoots me nor liberates me.
  • I do not wish to kill nor to be killed, but I can foresee circumstances in which both these things would be by me unavoidable. We preserve the so-called peace of our community by deeds of petty violence every day.^ I speak for the slave when I say that I prefer the philanthropy of Captain Brown to that philanthropy which neither shoots me nor liberates me.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thoreau stirs controversy with a spirited defense of John Brown: "I do not wish to kill or be killed, but I can foresee circumstances in which both these things would be by me unavoidable."
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not wish to kill nor to be killed, but I can foresee circumstances in which both these things would be by me unavoidable.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Look at the policeman's billy and handcuffs!^ Look at the policeman's billy and handcuffs!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    Look at the jail! Look at the gallows! .Look at the chaplain of the regiment!^ Look at the chaplain of the regiment!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .We are hoping only to live safely on the outskirts of this provisional army.^ We are hoping only to live safely on the outskirts of this provisional army.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .So we defend ourselves and our hen-roosts, and maintain slavery.^ So we defend ourselves and our hen-roosts, and maintain slavery.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I know that the mass of my countrymen think that the only righteous use that can be made of Sharp's rifles and revolvers is to fight duels with them, when we are insulted by other nations, or to hunt Indians, or shoot fugitive slaves with them, or the like.^ I know that the mass of my countrymen think that the only righteous use that can be made of Sharp's rifles and revolvers is to fight duels with them, when we are insulted by other nations, or to hunt Indians, or shoot fugitive slaves with them, or the like.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I think that for once the Sharp's rifles and the revolvers were employed in a righteous cause.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I often think that I should like to have my house front on this mass of dull red bushes, omitting other flower plots and borders, transplanted spruce and trim box, even graveled walks — to have this fertile spot under my windows, not a few imported barrowfuls of soil only to cover the sand which was thrown out in digging the cellar.
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I think that for once the Sharp's rifles and the revolvers were employed in a righteous cause.^ I think that for once the Sharp's rifles and the revolvers were employed in a righteous cause.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I know that the mass of my countrymen think that the only righteous use that can be made of Sharp's rifles and revolvers is to fight duels with them, when we are insulted by other nations, or to hunt Indians, or shoot fugitive slaves with them, or the like.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .The tools were in the hands of one who could use them.
  • I am here to plead his cause with you.^ I am here to plead his cause with you.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The tools were in the hands of one who could use them.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Who could believe in prophecies of Daniel or of Miller that the world would end this summer, while one milkweed with faith matured its seeds?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I plead not for his life, but for his character — his immortal life; and so it becomes your cause wholly, and is not his in the least.^ I plead not for his life, but for his character — his immortal life; and so it becomes your cause wholly, and is not his in the least.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I plead not for his life, but for his character - his immortal life; and so it becomes your cause wholly, and is not his in the least.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "If the day and the night are such that you greet them with with joy, and life emits a fragrance like flowers more elastic, more starry, more immortal-- that is your success."
    • Epinions.com - henry_thoreau's profile 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.epinions.com [Source type: General]

    .Some eighteen hundred years ago Christ was crucified; this morning, perchance, Captain Brown was hung.^ Some eighteen hundred years ago Christ was crucified; this morning, perchance, Captain Brown was hung.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For eighteen hundred years, though perchance I have no right to say it, the New Testament has been written; yet where is the legislator who has wisdom and practical talent enough to avail himself of the light which it sheds on the science of legislation?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC eca.state.gov [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For eighteen hundred years, though perchance I have no right to say it, the New Testament has been written; yet where is the legislator who has wisdom and practical talent enough to avail himself of the light which it sheds on the science of legislation.
    • Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1webapps.com [Source type: Original source]

    .These are the two ends of a chain which is not without its links.^ These are the two ends of a chain which is not without its links.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    He is not Old Brown any longer; he is an angel of light.

Walking (1862)

"Walking" began as a lecture called "The Wild," delivered by Henry at the Concord Lyceum on April 23, 1851. He gave this lecture many times, developing it into the essay finally published in the Atlantic Monthly after his death, in 1862.
.
In wildness is the preservation of the world.
  • In wildness is the preservation of the world.
  • Life consists with wildness.^ Life consists with wildness.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild; and what I have been preparing to say is, that in Wildness is the preservation of the World.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In wildness is the preservation of the world, from Henry David Thoreau.

    .The most alive is the wildest.^ The most alive is the wildest.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    Not yet subdued to man, its presence refreshes him.
  • Man flows at once to God when the channel of purity is open.
  • There are other letters for the child to learn than those which Cadmus invented.

Life Without Principle (1863)

.This essay was derived from the lecture "What Shall It Profit?"^ This essay was derived from the lecture "What Shall It Profit?"
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

which .Thoreau first delivered on 6 December 1854, at Railroad Hall in Providence, Rhode Island.^ Thoreau first delivered on 6 December 1854, at Railroad Hall in Providence, Rhode Island.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

He delivered it several times over the next two years, and edited it for publication before he died in 1862. It was first published in the October 1863 issue of The Atlantic Monthly where it was given its modern title.
The greatest compliment that was ever paid me was when one asked me what I thought, and attended to my answer.
  • The greatest compliment that was ever paid me was when one asked me what I thought, and attended to my answer. I am surprised, as well as delighted, when this happens, it is such a rare use he would make of me, as if he were acquainted with the tool.
.
If a man walk in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer...
  • I take it for granted, when I am invited to lecture anywhere, — for I have had a little experience in that business, — that there is a desire to hear what I think on some subject, though I may be the greatest fool in the country, — and not that I should say pleasant things merely, or such as the audience will assent to; and I resolve, accordingly, that I will give them a strong dose of myself.^ If a man walks in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I take it for granted, when I am invited to lecture anywhere, - for I have had a little experience in that business, - that there is a desire to hear what I think on some subject, though I may be the greatest fool in the country, - and not that I should say pleasant things merely, or such as the audience will assent to; and I resolve, accordingly, that I will give them a strong dose of myself.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If a man walk in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer...
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They have sent for me, and engaged to pay for me, and I am determined that they shall have me, though I bore them beyond all precedent.
  • I will not talk about people a thousand miles off, but come as near home as I can.^ I will not talk about people a thousand miles off, but come as near home as I can.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They have sent for me, and engaged to pay for me, and I am determined that they shall have me, though I bore them beyond all precedent.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Monday , Though All the Fates Should Prove Unkind , st. Far from New England's blustering shore, New England's worm her hulk shall bore, And sink her in the Indian seas, Twine, wine, and hides, and China teas.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .As the time is short, I will leave out all the flattery, and retain all the criticism.^ As the time is short, I will leave out all the flattery, and retain all the criticism.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]


    .Let us consider the way in which we spend our lives.
  • If a man walk in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer; but if he spends his whole day as a speculator, shearing off those woods and making earth bald before her time, he is esteemed an industrious and enterprising citizen. As if a town had no interest in its forests but to cut them down!
  • Most men would feel insulted, if it were proposed to employ them in throwing stones over a wall, and then in throwing them back, merely that they might earn their wages.^ As if a town had no interest in its forests but to cut them down!."

    ^ If a man walks in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Most men would feel insulted, if it were proposed to employ them in throwing stones over a wall, and then in throwing them back, merely that they might earn their wages.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .But many are no more worthily employed now.
  • The ways by which you may get money almost without exception lead downward.^ The ways by which you may get money almost without exception lead downward.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But many are no more worthily employed now.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But many are no more worthily employed now."

    .To have done anything by which you earned money merely is to have been truly idle or worse.
    If the laborer gets no more than the wages which his employer pays him, he is cheated, he cheats himself.
  • Those services which the community will most readily pay for it is most disagreeable to render.^ If the laborer gets no more than the wages which his employer pays him, he is cheated, he cheats himself.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To have done anything by which you earned money merely is to have been truly idle or worse.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To have done anything just for money is to have been truly idle.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .You are paid for being something less than a man.
  • As for my own business, even that kind of surveying which I could do with most satisfaction my employers do not want.^ You are paid for being something less than a man.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As for my own business, even that kind of surveying which I could do with most satisfaction my employers do not want.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I think that there is nothing, not even crime, more opposed to poetry, to philosophy, ay, to life itself than this incessant business.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .They would prefer that I should do my work coarsely and not too well, ay, not well enough.^ They would prefer that I should do my work coarsely and not too well, ay, not well enough.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But I foresee, that, if my wants should be much increased, the labor required to supply them would become a drudgery.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is not my business to be petitioning the Governor or the Legislature any more than it is theirs to petition me; and, if they should not hear my petition, what should I do then?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .When I observe that there are different ways of surveying, my employer commonly asks which will give him the most land, not which is most correct.
  • Do not hire a man who does your work for money, but him who does it for love of it.
  • The community has no bribe that will tempt a wise man.^ There is no remedy for love but to love more.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "There is no remedy for love but to love more."
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The community has no bribe that will tempt a wise man.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .You may raise money enough to tunnel a mountain, but you cannot raise money enough to hire a man who is minding his own business.^ You may raise money enough to tunnel a mountain, but you cannot raise money enough to hire a man who is minding his own business.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Tell me of the height of the mountains of the moon, or of the diameter of space, and I may believe you, but of the secret history of the Almighty, and I shall pronounce thee mad.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I lose my respect for the man who can make the mystery of sex the subject of a coarse jest, yet when you speak earnestly and seriously on the subject, is silent.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .An efficient and valuable man does what he can, whether the community pay him for it or not. The inefficient offer their inefficiency to the highest bidder, and are forever expecting to be put into office.^ An efficient and valuable man does what he can, whether the community pay him for it or not.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The inefficient offer their inefficiency to the highest bidder, and are forever expecting to be put into office.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For most men, it appears to me, are in a strange uncertainty about it, whether it is of the devil or of God, and have somewhat hastily concluded that it is the chief end of man here to "glorify God and enjoy him forever."
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    One would suppose that they were rarely disappointed.
.
You must get your living by loving.
  • Perhaps I am more than usually jealous with respect to my freedom.^ You must get your living by loving.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is more lone than you can imagine."
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ You must get your living by loving, or at least half your life is a failure.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I feel that my connection with and obligation to society are still very slight and transient.^ I feel that my connection with and obligation to society are still very slight and transient.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Though the view from my door was still more contracted, I did not feel crowded or confined in the least.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations and my obligations to society.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Those slight labors which afford me a livelihood, and by which it is allowed that I am to some extent serviceable to my contemporaries, are as yet commonly a pleasure to me, and I am not often reminded that they are a necessity.^ Those slight labors which afford me a livelihood, and by which it is allowed that I am to some extent serviceable to my contemporaries, are as yet commonly a pleasure to me, and I am not often reminded that they are a necessity.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As they could not reach me, they had resolved to punish my body; just as boys, if they cannot come at some person against whom they have a spite, will abuse his dog.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I wondered that it should have concluded at length that this was the best use it could put me to, and had never thought to avail itself of my services in some way.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau : On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1848) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.panarchy.org [Source type: Original source]

    So far I am successful. .But I foresee, that, if my wants should be much increased, the labor required to supply them would become a drudgery.^ But I foresee, that, if my wants should be much increased, the labor required to supply them would become a drudgery.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I should not lay so much stress on this fact, if I did not believe that something like this is the prevailing tendency of my countrymen.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They would prefer that I should do my work coarsely and not too well, ay, not well enough.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .If I should sell both my forenoons and afternoons to society, as most appear to do, I am sure, that, for me, there would be nothing left worth living for.
  • I wish to suggest that a man may be very industrious, and yet not spend his time well.^ I wish to suggest that a man may be very industrious, and yet not spend his time well.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "If I should sell both my forenoons and afternoons to society," wrote Thoreau in his journal, "as most appear to do, I am sure that for me there would be nothing left worth living for.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There was a man in my neighborhood who lived in a hollow tree.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .There is no more fatal blunderer than he who consumes the greater part of his life getting his living.
    All great enterprises are self-supporting.^ There is no other land; there is no other life but this.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is no remedy for love but to love more.
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "There is no remedy for love but to love more."
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]

    .The poet, for instance, must sustain his body by his poetry, as a steam planing-mill feeds its boilers with the shavings it makes.^ The poet, for instance, must sustain his body by his poetry, as a steam planing-mill feeds its boilers with the shavings it makes.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .You must get your living by loving.
  • Merely to come into the world the heir of a fortune is not to be born, but to be still-born, rather.^ You must get your living by loving.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You must be born into the family of the Walkers.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You must get your living by loving, or at least half your life is a failure.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .To be supported by the charity of friends, or a government-pension, — provided you continue to breathe, — by whatever fine synonymes you describe these relations, is to go into the almshouse.
  • In the Catholic Church, especially, they go into chancery, make a clean confession, give up all, and think to start again.^ In the Catholic Church, especially, they go into chancery, make a clean confession, give up all, and think to start again.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To be supported by the charity of friends, or a government-pension, — provided you continue to breathe, — by whatever fine synonymes you describe these relations, is to go into the almshouse.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To be supported by the charity of friends, or a government-pension, - provided you continue to breathe, - by whatever fine synonymes you describe these relations, is to go into the almshouse.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    Thus men will lie on their backs, talking about the fall of man, and never make an effort to get up.
.
A grain of gold will gild a great surface, but not so much as a grain of wisdom.
  • The title wise is, for the most part, falsely applied. How can one be a wise man, if he does not know any better how to live than other men?^ How can one be a wise man, if he does not know any better how to live than other men?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A grain of gold will gild a great surface, but not so much as a grain of wisdom.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For the most part, we are not where we are, but in a false position.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    — if he is only more cunning and intellectually subtle?
  • .
  • The rush to California, for instance, and the attitude, not merely of merchants, but of philosophers and prophets, so called, in relation to it, reflect the greatest disgrace on mankind.^ The rush to California, for instance, and the attitude, not merely of merchants, but of philosophers and prophets, so called, in relation to it, reflect the greatest disgrace on mankind.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .That so many are ready to live by luck, and so get the means of commanding the labor of others less lucky, without contributing any value to society!
  • I did not know that mankind were suffering for want of gold.^ That so many are ready to live by luck, and so get the means of commanding the labor of others less lucky, without contributing any value to society!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I did not know that mankind were suffering for want of gold.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Gold, discovered in California, triggers a massive westward rush: "That so many are ready to live by luck, and so get the means of commanding the labor of others less lucky, without contributing any value to society!
    • United Earth - Henry David Thoreau Quotes & Biography 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.unitedearth.com.au [Source type: Original source]

    I have seen a little of it. .I know that it is very malleable, but not so malleable as wit.^ I know that it is very malleable, but not so malleable as wit.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .A grain of gold will gild a great surface, but not so much as a grain of wisdom.
  • Men rush to California and Australia as if the true gold were to be found in that direction; but that is to go to the very opposite extreme to where it lies.^ Men rush to California and Australia as if the true gold were to be found in that direction; but that is to go to the very opposite extreme to where it lies.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A grain of gold will gild a great surface, but not so much as a grain of wisdom.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His mother found the little boy lying so one night, long after he had gone upstairs, and said, "Why, Henry dear, why don't you go to sleep?"
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .They go prospecting farther and farther away from the true lead, and are most unfortunate when they think themselves most successful.
  • Howitt says of the man who found the great nugget which weighed twenty-eight pounds, at the Bendigo diggings in Australia: — "He soon began to drink; got a horse, and rode all about, generally at full gallop, and, when he met people, called out to inquire if they knew who he was, and then kindly informed them that he was 'the bloody wretch that had found the nugget.'^ They go prospecting farther and farther away from the true lead, and are most unfortunate when they think themselves most successful.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Howitt says of the man who found the great nugget which weighed twenty-eight pounds, at the Bendigo diggings in Australia: - 'He soon began to drink; got a horse, and rode all about, generally at full gallop, and, when he met people, called out to inquire if they knew who he was, and then kindly informed them that he was 'the bloody wretch that had found the nugget.'
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Howitt says of the man who found the great nugget which weighed twenty-eight pounds, at the Bendigo diggings in Australia: — "He soon began to drink; got a horse, and rode all about, generally at full gallop, and, when he met people, called out to inquire if they knew who he was, and then kindly informed them that he was 'the bloody wretch that had found the nugget.'
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .At last he rode full speed against a tree, and nearly knocked his brains out."^ At last he rode full speed against a tree, and nearly knocked his brains out.'
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ At last he rode full speed against a tree, and nearly knocked his brains out."
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I think, however, there was no danger of that, for he had already knocked his brains out against the nugget.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    I think, however, there was no danger of that, for he had already knocked his brains out against the nugget.
.
A little thought is sexton to all the world.
  • It is remarkable that among all the preachers there are so few moral teachers.^ It is remarkable that among all the preachers there are so few moral teachers.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A little thought is sexton to all the world.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thoreau wrote in his journal: "There are poets of all kinds and degrees, little known to each other.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .The prophets are employed in excusing the ways of men.
  • In our science and philosophy, even, there is commonly no true and absolute account of things.^ The prophets are employed in excusing the ways of men.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In our science and philosophy, even, there is commonly no true and absolute account of things.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not know that this higher knowledge amounts to anything more definite than a novel and grand surprise on a sudden revelation of the insufficiency of all that we called Knowledge before--a discovery that there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in our philosophy.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The spirit of sect and bigotry has planted its hoof amid the stars.^ The spirit of sect and bigotry has planted its hoof amid the stars.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .You have only to discuss the problem, whether the stars are inhabited or not, in order to discover it.
  • Of what significance the things you can forget?^ You have only to discuss the problem, whether the stars are inhabited or not, in order to discover it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of what significance the things you can forget?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Of what significance are the things you can forget.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .A little thought is sexton to all the world.
  • I hardly know an intellectual man, even, who is so broad and truly liberal that you can think aloud in his society. Most with whom you endeavor to talk soon come to a stand against some institution in which they appear to hold stock, — that is, some particular, not universal, way of viewing things.
  • In some lyceums they tell me that they have voted to exclude the subject of religion.^ A little thought is sexton to all the world.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In some lyceums they tell me that they have voted to exclude the subject of religion.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Most with whom you endeavor to talk soon come to a stand against some institution in which they appear to hold stock, - that is, some particular, not universal, way of viewing things.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .But how do I know what their religion is, and when I am near to or far from it?^ But how do I know what their religion is, and when I am near to or far from it?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He chose wisely, no doubt, for himself to be the bachelor of thought and nature that he was -- how near to the old monks in their ascetic religion!
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .I have walked into such an arena and done my best to make a clean breast of what religion I have experienced, and the audience never suspected what I was about.
  • To speak impartially, the best men that I know are not serene, a world in themselves.^ To speak impartially, the best men that I know are not serene, a world in themselves.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I have walked into such an arena and done my best to make a clean breast of what religion I have experienced, and the audience never suspected what I was about.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But, to speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .For the most part, they dwell in forms, and flatter and study effect only more finely than the rest.^ For the most part, they dwell in forms, and flatter and study effect only more finely than the rest.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You must love the crust of the earth on which you dwell more than the sweet crust of any bread or cake; you must be able to extract nutriment out of a sand heap.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ As if they were the skeletons of still older and more universal truths than any whose flesh and blood they are for the time made to wear.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .We select granite for the underpinning of our houses and barns; we build fences of stone; but we do not ourselves rest on an underpinning of granitic truth, the lowest primitive rock.^ We select granite for the underpinning of our houses and barns; we build fences of stone; but we do not ourselves rest on an underpinning of granitic truth, the lowest primitive rock.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yet we think that if rail‑fences are pulled down, and stone‑walls piled up on our farms, bounds are henceforth set to our lives and our fates decided.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Our sills are rotten.
.
It requires more than a day's devotion to know and to possess the wealth of a day.
  • While there are manners and compliments we do not meet, we do not teach one another the lessons of honesty and sincerity that the brutes do, or of steadiness and solidity that the rocks do.^ It requires more than a day's devotion to know and to possess the wealth of a day.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ While there are manners and compliments we do not meet, we do not teach one another the lessons of honesty and sincerity that the brutes do, or of steadiness and solidity that the rocks do.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is more day to dawn.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The fault is commonly mutual, however; for we do not habitually demand any more of each other.
  • When our life ceases to be inward and private, conversation degenerates into mere gossip.^ "When our life ceases to be inward and private, conversation degenerates into mere gossip."

    ^ When our life ceases to be inward and private, conversation degenerates into mere gossip.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The fault is commonly mutual, however; for we do not habitually demand any more of each other.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .We rarely meet a man who can tell us any news which he has not read in a newspaper, or been told by his neighbor; and, for the most part, the only difference between us and our fellow is, that he has seen the newspaper, or been out to tea, and we have not.^ Such is, for the most part, the news in newspapers and conversation.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The news we hear, for the most part, is not news to our genius.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We rarely meet a man who can tell us any news which he has not read in a newspaper, or been told by his neighbor; and, for the most part, the only difference between us and our fellow is, that he has seen the newspaper, or been out to tea, and we have not.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .In proportion as our inward life fails, we go more constantly and desperately to the post-office.
  • I do not know but it is too much to read one newspaper a week.^ I do not know but it is too much to read one newspaper a week.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In proportion as our inward life fails, we go more constantly and desperately to the post-office.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "When I used to pick the berries for dinner on the East Quarter hills I did not eat one till I had done, for going a-berrying implies more things than eating the berries.

    .I have tried it recently, and for so long it seems to me that I have not dwelt in my native region.^ I have tried it recently, and for so long it seems to me that I have not dwelt in my native region.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Moreover I have tried it fairly and, strange as it may seem, am satisfied that it does not agree with my constitution.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The sun, the clouds, the snow, the trees say not so much to me.^ The sun, the clouds, the snow, the trees say not so much to me.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .You cannot serve two masters.^ You cannot serve two masters.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It requires more than a day's devotion to know and to possess the wealth of a day.
  • We may well be ashamed to tell what things we have read or heard in our day.^ It requires more than a day's devotion to know and to possess the wealth of a day.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We may well be ashamed to tell what things we have read or heard in our day.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not know that this higher knowledge amounts to anything more definite than a novel and grand surprise on a sudden revelation of the insufficiency of all that we called Knowledge before--a discovery that there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in our philosophy.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I do not know why my news should be so trivial, — considering what one's dreams and expectations are, why the developments should be so paltry.^ I do not know why my news should be so trivial, - considering what one's dreams and expectations are, why the developments should be so paltry.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why should one give in to that?
    • Abolitionists, Emerson, and Thoreau by Sanderson Beck 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.san.beck.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not know why my news should be so trivial, — considering what one's dreams and expectations are, why the developments should be so paltry.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The news we hear, for the most part, is not news to our genius.^ The news we hear, for the most part, is not news to our genius.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And even as these his most prized and his coveted ties were parting or becoming impossible, new ones, more helpful if less desired, were presenting.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such is, for the most part, the news in newspapers and conversation.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    It is the stalest repetition.
  • We do not live for idle amusement. I would not run round a corner to see the world blow up.
Read not the Times. .Read the Eternities.
  • Not without a slight shudder at the danger, I often perceive how near I had come to admitting into my mind the details of some trivial affair, — the news of the street; and I am astonished to observe how willing men are to lumber their minds with such rubbish, — to permit idle rumors and incidents of the most insignificant kind to intrude on ground which should be sacred to thought.^ Not without a slight shudder at the danger, I often perceive how near I had come to admitting into my mind the details of some trivial affair, — the news of the street; and I am astonished to observe how willing men are to lumber their minds with such rubbish, — to permit idle rumors and incidents of the most insignificant kind to intrude on ground which should be sacred to thought.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Not without a slight shudder at the danger, I often perceive how near I had come to admitting into my mind the details of some trivial affair, - the news of the street; and I am astonished to observe how willing men are to lumber their minds with such rubbish, - to permit idle rumors and incidents of the most insignificant kind to intrude on ground which should be sacred to thought.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My books I'd fain cast off, I cannot read, 'Twixt every page my thoughts go stray at large Down in the meadow, where is richer feed, And will not mind to hit their proper targe.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Shall the mind be a public arena, where the affairs of the street and the gossip of the tea-table chiefly are discussed?^ Shall the mind be a public arena, where the affairs of the street and the gossip of the tea-table chiefly are discussed?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Or shall it be a quarter of heaven itself, — an hypæthral temple, consecrated to the service of the gods?^ Or shall it be a quarter of heaven itself, — an hypæthral temple, consecrated to the service of the gods?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Or shall it be a quarter of heaven itself, - an hyp?thral temple, consecrated to the service of the gods?
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I find it so difficult to dispose of the few facts which to me are significant, that I hesitate to burden my attention with those which are insignificant, which only a divine mind could illustrate.^ I find it so difficult to dispose of the few facts which to me are significant, that I hesitate to burden my attention with those which are insignificant, which only a divine mind could illustrate.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "There comes into my mind such an indescribable, infinite, all-absorbing, divine, heavenly pleasure, a sense of elevation and expansion, and [I] have nought to do with it.

    .Such is, for the most part, the news in newspapers and conversation.^ Such is, for the most part, the news in newspapers and conversation.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I discovered that my house actually had its site in such a withdrawn, but forever new and unprofaned, part of the universe.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And even as these his most prized and his coveted ties were parting or becoming impossible, new ones, more helpful if less desired, were presenting.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .It is important to preserve the mind's chastity in this respect.
  • It is so hard to forget what it is worse than useless to remember!^ It is so hard to forget what it is worse than useless to remember!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "It is so hard to forget what it is worse than useless to remember!"

    ^ It is important to preserve the mind's chastity in this respect.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .If I am to be a thoroughfare, I prefer that it be of the mountain-brooks, the Parnassian streams, and not the town-sewers.
    There is inspiration, that gossip which comes to the ear of the attentive mind from the courts of heaven.^ If I am to be a thoroughfare, I prefer that it be of the mountain-brooks, the Parnassian streams, and not the town-sewers.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is inspiration, that gossip which comes to the ear of the attentive mind from the courts of heaven.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "There comes into my mind such an indescribable, infinite, all-absorbing, divine, heavenly pleasure, a sense of elevation and expansion, and [I] have nought to do with it.

    .There is the profane and stale revelation of the bar-room and the police court.^ There is the profane and stale revelation of the bar-room and the police court.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .The same ear is fitted to receive both communications.^ The same ear is fitted to receive both communications.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Only the character of the hearer determines to which it shall be open, and to which closed.^ Only the character of the hearer determines to which it shall be open, and to which closed.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality.
.
Where there is a lull of truth, an institution springs up.
^ Where there is a lull of truth, an institution springs up.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

.But the truth blows right on over it, nevertheless, and at length blows it down.
  • Read not the Times.^ But the truth blows right on over it, nevertheless, and at length blows it down.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    Read the Eternities. .Conventionalities are at length as bad as impurities.^ Conventionalities are at length as bad as impurities.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Even the facts of science may dust the mind by their dryness, unless they are in a sense effaced each morning, or rather rendered fertile by the dews of fresh and living truth.^ Even the facts of science may dust the mind by their dryness, unless they are in a sense effaced each morning, or rather rendered fertile by the dews of fresh and living truth.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Even the facts of science," said he, "may dust the mind by their dryness, unless they are in a sense effaced by the dews of fresh and living truth."
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The wildest dreams of wild men, even, are not the less true, though they may not recommend themselves to the sense which is most common among Englishmen and Americans today.
    • Walking - Henry David Thoreau 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.transcendentalists.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Walking by Henry David Thoreau - Full Text Free Book 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven.
    Yes, every thought that passes through the mind helps to wear and tear it, and to deepen the ruts, which, as in the streets of Pompeii, evince how much it has been used.^ Yes, every thought that passes through the mind helps to wear and tear it, and to deepen the ruts, which, as in the streets of Pompeii, evince how much it has been used.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Knowledge does not come to us in details, but in flashes of light from heaven.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .How many things there are concerning which we might well deliberate, whether we had better know them, — had better let their peddling-carts be driven, even at the slowest trot or walk, over that bridge of glorious span by which we trust to pass at last from the farthest brink of time to the nearest shore of eternity!^ How many things there are concerning which we might well deliberate, whether we had better know them, — had better let their peddling-carts be driven, even at the slowest trot or walk, over that bridge of glorious span by which we trust to pass at last from the farthest brink of time to the nearest shore of eternity!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How many things there are concerning which we might well deliberate whether we had better know them.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not know any better how I came to go there.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Have we no culture, no refinement, — but skill only to live coarsely and serve the Devil?^ Have we no culture, no refinement, — but skill only to live coarsely and serve the Devil?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Have we no culture, no refinement, - but skill only to live coarsely and serve the Devil?
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    — to acquire a little worldly wealth, or fame, or liberty, and make a false show with it, as if we were all husk and shell, with no tender and living kernel to us? .Shall our institutions be like those chestnut-burs which contain abortive nuts, perfect only to prick the fingers?
  • Do we call this the land of the free?^ Do we call this the land of the free?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Shall our institutions be like those chestnut-burs which contain abortive nuts, perfect only to prick the fingers?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .What is it to be free from King George and continue the slaves of King Prejudice?
    What is it to be born free and not to live free?^ What is it to be free from King George and continue the slaves of King Prejudice?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What is it to be born free and not to live free?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ By Alexander Fraser Tytler With a continuation, terminating at the demise of King George III., 1,820.
    • Books from the Library of Henry David Thoreau, 1776-1869. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.concordlibrary.org [Source type: Academic]

    .What is the value of any political freedom, but as a means to moral freedom?^ What is the value of any political freedom, but as a means to moral freedom?
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Is it a freedom to be slaves, or a freedom to be free, of which we boast?^ Is it a freedom to be slaves, or a freedom to be free, of which we boast?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .We are a nation of politicians, concerned about the outmost defences only of freedom.^ We are a nation of politicians, concerned about the outmost defences only of freedom.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It is our children's children who may perchance be really free.
  • With respect to a true culture and manhood, we are essentially provincial still, not metropolitan, — mere Jonathans.^ It is our children's children who may perchance be really free.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ With respect to a true culture and manhood, we are essentially provincial still, not metropolitan, - mere Jonathans.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Live free, child of the mist — and with respect to knowledge we are all children of the mist.
    • Walking « EcoTopia 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.ecotopia.org [Source type: Original source]

    .We are provincial, because we do not find at home our standards, — because we do not worship truth, but the reflection of truth, — because we are warped and narrowed by an exclusive devotion to trade and commerce and manufactures and agriculture and the like, which are but means, and not the end.
  • The finest manners in the world are awkwardness and fatuity, when contrasted with a finer intelligence.
  • Where there is a lull of truth, an institution springs up.^ The finest manners in the world are awkwardness and fatuity, when contrasted with a finer intelligence.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Where there is a lull of truth, an institution springs up.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We are provincial, because we do not find at home our standards, - because we do not worship truth, but the reflection of truth, - because we are warped and narrowed by an exclusive devotion to trade and commerce and manufactures and agriculture and the like, which are but means, and not the end.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    But the truth blows right on over it, nevertheless, and at length blows it down.
.
Why should we not meet, not always as dyspeptics, to tell our bad dreams, but sometimes as eupeptics, to congratulate each other on the ever glorious morning?
  • What is called politics is comparatively something so superficial and inhuman, that, practically, I have never fairly recognized that it concerns me at all. The newspapers, I perceive, devote some of their columns specially to politics or government without charge; and this, one would say, is all that saves it; but, as I love literature, and, to some extent, the truth also, I never read those columns at any rate.^ The newspapers, I perceive, devote some of their columns specially to politics or government without charge; and this, one would say, is all that saves it; but, as I love literature, and, to some extent, the truth also, I never read those columns at any rate.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why should we not meet, not always as dyspeptics, to tell our bad dreams, but sometimes as eupeptics, to congratulate each other on the ever glorious morning?
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What is called politics is comparatively something so superficial and inhuman, that, practically, I have never fairly recognized that it concerns me at all.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I do not wish to blunt my sense of right so much.
  • Those things which now most engage the attention of men, as politics and the daily routine, are, it is true, vital functions of human society, but should be unconsciously performed, like the corresponding functions of the physical body.^ Those things which now most engage the attention of men, as politics and the daily routine, are, it is true, vital functions of human society, but should be unconsciously performed, like the corresponding functions of the physical body.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I do not wish to blunt my sense of right so much.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ After all, the practical reason why, when the power is once in the hands of the people, a majority are permitted, and for a long period continue, to rule, is not because they are most likely to be in the right, nor because this seems fairest to the minority, but because they are physically the strongest.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .They are infra-human, a kind of vegetation. I sometimes awake to a half-consciousness of them going on about me, as a man may become conscious of some of the processes of digestion in a morbid state, and so have the dyspepsia, as it is called.
  • Politics is, as it were, the gizzard of society, full of grit and gravel, and the two political parties are its two opposite halves, — sometimes split into quarters, it may be, which grind on each other.^ They are kind to each other's dreams."

    ^ They are infra -human, a kind of vegetation.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I sometimes awake to a half-consciousness of them going on about me, as a man may become conscious of some of the processes of digestion in a morbid state, and so have the dyspepsia, as it is called.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Not only individuals, but States, have thus a confirmed dyspepsia, which expresses itself, you can imagine by what sort of eloquence.^ Not only individuals, but States, have thus a confirmed dyspepsia, which expresses itself, you can imagine by what sort of eloquence.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Not only individuals but states have thus a confirmed dyspepsia.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It not only divides states and churches, it divides families; ay, it divides the individual, separating the diabolical in him from the divine.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Thus our life is not altogether a forgetting, but also, alas!^ Thus our life is not altogether a forgetting, but also, alas!
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    to a great extent, a remembering of that which we should never have been conscious of, certainly not in our waking hours. .Why should we not meet, not always as dyspeptics, to tell our bad dreams, but sometimes as eupeptics, to congratulate each other on the ever glorious morning?^ Why should we not meet, not always as dyspeptics, to tell our bad dreams, but sometimes as eupeptics, to congratulate each other on the ever glorious morning?
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Why should we not meet, not always as dyspeptics, to tell our bad dreams, but sometimes as eu peptics, to congratulate each other on the ever glorious morning?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ History tells of Orestes and Pylades, Damon and Pythias, but why should not we put to shame those old reserved worthies by a community of such?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    I do not make an exorbitant demand, surely.
Who could believe in prophecies of Daniel or of Miller that the world would end this summer, while one milkweed with faith matured its seeds?

The Dispersion of Seeds (1993)

Manuscripts of Thoreau published in Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds and Other Late Natural History Writings (1993) edited by Bradley P. Dean

Misattributed

.
  • Truths and roses have thorns about them.^ Truths and roses have thorns about them.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • This is commonly misattributed because Thoreau wrote it in his journal June 14, 1838, but it was not original.^ This is commonly misattributed because Thoreau wrote it in his journal June 14, 1838, but it was not original.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Henry David Thoreau , Journal , October 14, 1857 .
      • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Accepting the returns with surprising good humor, Thoreau wrote in his journal, "I have now a library of nearly nine hundred volumes, over seven hundred of which I wrote myself."
      • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .This was a popular aphorism in his day, appearing in several collections of proverbs during his lifetime.^ This was a popular aphorism in his day, appearing in several collections of proverbs during his lifetime.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      Its origin is unknown, but it had appeared in print before his birth. E.g., in Joseph Dennie and Asbury Dickins, The Port folio, vol.2, no.1 (July 1809), p. .431; and in Felipe Fernandez, Exercises on the rules of construction of the Spanish language, 3rd ed.^ Felipe Fernandez, Exercises on the rules of construction of the Spanish language , 3rd ed.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      (1811), p. .228.
  • None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm.^ None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm .
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • First attributed to Thoreau in A year of sunshine: cheerful extracts for every day in the year‎ (Kate Sanborn, 1886) and American literature‎ (Mildred Cabell Watkins, 1894), but there is no known citation to Thoreau's works.
  • Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.^ Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No known citation to Thoreau's works.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ First attributed to Thoreau in A year of sunshine: cheerful extracts for every day in the year‎ (Kate Sanborn, 1886) and American literature‎ (Mildred Cabell Watkins, 1894), but there is no known citation to Thoreau's works.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • No known citation to Thoreau's works.^ No known citation to Thoreau's works.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ First attributed to Thoreau in A year of sunshine: cheerful extracts for every day in the year‎ (Kate Sanborn, 1886) and American literature‎ (Mildred Cabell Watkins, 1894), but there is no known citation to Thoreau's works.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      First found, uncredited, in the 1940s in the variant "Success usually comes to those who are too busy to look for it", p.711, Locomotive Engineers Journal, Volume 76, 1942. Google Books

Quotes about Thoreau

.
  • Thoreau believed that one of the arts of life was to make the most of it. He loved the multum in parvo, or pot-luck; to boil up the little into the big.^ Thoreau's life at the pond was an active one.
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Thoreau believed that one of the arts of life was to make the most of it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He loved the multum in parvo, or pot-luck; to boil up the little into the big.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Thus, he was in the habit of saying, — Give me healthy senses, let me be thoroughly alive, and breathe freely in the very flood-tide of the living world.^ Thus, he was in the habit of saying, — Give me healthy senses, let me be thoroughly alive, and breathe freely in the very flood-tide of the living world.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus, he was in the habit of saying, - Give me healthy senses, let me be thoroughly alive, and breathe freely in the very flood-tide of the living world.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Still thinking of the sanction which the Constitution gives to slavery, he says, Because it was a part of the original compact,‑‑let it stand.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .But this should have availed him little, if he had not been at the same time copiously endowed with the power of recording what he imbibed.^ But this should have availed him little, if he had not been at the same time copiously endowed with the power of recording what he imbibed.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In reading him I find the same thoughts, the same spirit that is in me, but he takes a step beyond and illustrates by excellent images that which I should have conveyed in a sleepy generalization.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In reading him, I find the same thoughts, the same spirit that is in me, but he takes a step beyond, & illustrates by excellent images that which I should have conveyed in a sleepy generality.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .His senses truly lived twice.^ His senses truly lived twice.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • William Ellery Channing in Thoreau: the Poet-naturalist: With Memorial Verses (1873), Ch.^ William Ellery Channing, Thoreau: The Poet-Naturalist.
      • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ With Memorial Verses (Boston: Roberts, 1873); enlarged edition, edited by F. B. Sanborn (Boston: Charles E. Goodspeed, 1902).
      • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Thoreau : the poet-naturalist, with memorial verses, by William Ellery Channing.

      .11 Multum In Parvo
  • His words also were as distinct and true to the ear as those of a great singer, and he had Tennyson's splendid gift in this, that he never went back on his tracks to pick up the fallen loops of a sentence as commonplace talkers do.^ His words also were as distinct and true to the ear as those of a great singer, and he had Tennyson's splendid gift in this, that he never went back on his tracks to pick up the fallen loops of a sentence as commonplace talkers do.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Multum In Parvo His words also were as distinct and true to the ear as those of a great singer, and he had Tennyson 's splendid gift in this, that he never went back on his tracks to pick up the fallen loops of a sentence as commonplace talkers do.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus men will lie on their backs, talking about the fall of man, and never make an effort to get up.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .He would hesitate for an instant now and then, waiting for the right word, or would pause with a pathetic patience to master the trouble in his chest, but when he was through the sentence was perfect and entire, lacking nothing, and the word was so purely one with the man that when I read his books now and then I do not hear my own voice within my reading but the voice I heard that day.^ He would hesitate for an instant now and then, waiting for the right word, or would pause with a pathetic patience to master the trouble in his chest, but when he was through the sentence was perfect and entire, lacking nothing, and the word was so purely one with the man that when I read his books now and then I do not hear my own voice within my reading but the voice I heard that day.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The New Testament is an invaluable book, though I confess to having been slightly prejudiced against it in my very early days by the church and the Sabbath school, so that it seemed, before I read it, to be the yellowest book in the catalogue.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What we want to see is one who can breast into the world, do a man's work, and still preserve his first and pure enjoyment of existence.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Robert Collyer in "Thoreau" an address at the Church of the Messiah (28 January 1883); first published in Clear Grit: A Collection of Lectures, Addresses and Poems (1913)
  • He chose to be rich by making his wants few, and supplying them himself. In his travels, he used the railroad only to get over so much country as was unimportant to the present purpose, walking hundreds of miles, avoiding taverns, buying a lodging in farmers' and fishermen's houses, as cheaper, and more agreeable to him, and because there he could better find the men and the information he wanted.^ It is for want of a man that there are so many men.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In his travels, he used the railroad only to get over so much country as was unimportant to the present purpose, walking hundreds of miles, avoiding taverns, buying a lodging in farmers' and fishermen's houses, as cheaper, and more agreeable to him, and because there he could better find the men and the information he wanted.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Robert Collyer in "Thoreau" an address at the Church of the Messiah (28 January 1883); first published in Clear Grit: A Collection of Lectures, Addresses and Poems (1913) He chose to be rich by making his wants few, and supplying them himself.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .There was somewhat military in his nature not to be subdued, always manly and able, but rarely tender, as if he did not feel himself except in opposition.^ There was somewhat military in his nature not to be subdued, always manly and able, but rarely tender, as if he did not feel himself except in opposition.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He wanted a fallacy to expose, a blunder to pillory, I may say required a little sense of victory, a roll of the drum, to call his powers into full exercise.^ He wanted a fallacy to expose, a blunder to pillory, I may say required a little sense of victory, a roll of the drum, to call his powers into full exercise.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Politics is, as it were, the gizzard of society, full of grit and gravel, and the two political parties are its two opposite halves, — sometimes split into quarters, it may be, which grind on each other.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Idealist as he was, standing for abolition of slavery, abolition of tariffs, almost for abolition of government, it is needless to say he found himself not only unrepresented in actual politics, but almost equally opposed to every class of reformers.
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson in "Thoreau" in The Atlantic Monthly (August 1862)
  • I think his fancy for referring everything to the meridian of Concord did not grow out of any ignorance or depreciation of other longitudes or latitudes, but was rather a playful expression of his conviction of the indifferency of all places, and that the best place for each is where he stands.^ Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882.

    ^ Ralph Waldo Emerson in "Thoreau" in The Atlantic Monthly (August 1862) In reading Henry Thoreau's Journal, I am very sensible of the vigor of his constitution.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ With a biographical sketch of Thoreau by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

    .He expressed it once in this wise: — "I think nothing is to be hoped from you, if this bit of mould under your feet is not sweeter to you to eat than any other in this world, or in any world."^ He expressed it once in this wise: — "I think nothing is to be hoped from you, if this bit of mould under your feet is not sweeter to you to eat than any other in this world, or in any world."
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I think that there is nothing, not even crime, more opposed to poetry, to philosophy, ay, to life itself than this incessant business.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Drive a nail home and clinch it so faithfully that you can wake up in the night and think of your work with satisfaction,‑‑a work at which you would not be ashamed to invoke the Muse.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson in "Thoreau" in The Atlantic Monthly (August 1862)
  • Whilst he used in his writings a certain petulance of remark in reference to churches or churchmen, he was a person of a rare, tender, and absolute religion, a person incapable of any profanation, by act or by thought.^ Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882.

    ^ Ralph Waldo Emerson in "Thoreau" in The Atlantic Monthly (August 1862) In reading Henry Thoreau's Journal, I am very sensible of the vigor of his constitution.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ [Ralph Waldo Emerson] asked.

    .Of course, the same isolation which belonged to his original thinking and living detached him from the social religious forms.^ Of course, the same isolation which belonged to his original thinking and living detached him from the social religious forms.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .This is neither to be censured nor regretted.^ This is neither to be censured nor regretted.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Aristotle long ago explained it, when he said, "One who surpasses his fellow-citizens in virtue is no longer a part of the city.^ Aristotle long ago explained it, when he said, "One who surpasses his fellow-citizens in virtue is no longer a part of the city.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Aristotle long ago explained it, when he said, 'One who surpasses his fellow-citizens in virtue is no longer a part of the city.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But, to speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .Their law is not for him, since he is a law to himself."^ Their law is not for him, since he is a law to himself.'
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Their law is not for him, since he is a law to himself."
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Thoreau was sincerity itself, and might fortify the convictions of prophets in the ethical laws by his holy living.^ Thoreau was sincerity itself, and might fortify the convictions of prophets in the ethical laws by his holy living.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .It was an affirmative experience which refused to be set aside.^ It was an affirmative experience which refused to be set aside.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He is far more real, and daily practically obeying them, than I, and fortifies my memory at all times with an affirmative experience which refuses to be set aside."
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .A truth-speaker he, capable of the most deep and strict conversation; a physician to the wounds of any soul; a friend, knowing not only the secret of friendship, but almost worshipped by those few persons who resorted to him as their confessor and prophet, and knew the deep value of his mind and great heart.^ A truth-speaker he, capable of the most deep and strict conversation; a physician to the wounds of any soul; a friend, knowing not only the secret of friendship, but almost worshipped by those few persons who resorted to him as their confessor and prophet, and knew the deep value of his mind and great heart.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Yet, compared with the cheap professions of most reformers, and the still cheaper wisdom and eloquence of politicians in general, his are almost the only sensible and valuable words, and we thank Heaven for him.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who, while they disapprove of the character and measures of a government, yield to it their allegiance and support, are undoubtedly its most conscientious supporters, and so frequently the most serious obstacles to reform.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .He thought that without religion or devotion of some kind nothing great was ever accomplished: and he thought that the bigoted sectarian had better bear this in mind.^ He thought that without religion or devotion of some kind nothing great was ever accomplished: and he thought that the bigoted sectarian had better bear this in mind.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When, at rare intervals, some thought visits one, as perchance he is walking on a railroad, then, indeed, the cars go by without his hearing them.

    .
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson in "Thoreau" in The Atlantic Monthly (August 1862)
  • In reading Henry Thoreau's Journal, I am very sensible of the vigor of his constitution. That oaken strength which I noted whenever he walked or worked or surveyed wood lots, the same unhesitating hand with which a field-laborer accosts a piece of work which I should shun as a waste of strength, Henry shows in his literary task.^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862 .
    • Browse By Author: T - Project Gutenberg 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franklin Subject Browse Demo 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC devplw.library.upenn.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862.

    ^ That oaken strength which I noted whenever he walked or worked or surveyed wood lots, the same unhesitating hand with which a field-laborer accosts a piece of work which I should shun as a waste of strength, Henry shows in his literary task.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .He has muscle, & ventures on & performs tasks which I am forced to decline.^ He has muscle and ventures on and performs feats which I am forced to decline.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He has muscle, & ventures on & performs tasks which I am forced to decline.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .In reading him, I find the same thoughts, the same spirit that is in me, but he takes a step beyond, & illustrates by excellent images that which I should have conveyed in a sleepy generality.^ In reading him I find the same thoughts, the same spirit that is in me, but he takes a step beyond and illustrates by excellent images that which I should have conveyed in a sleepy generalization.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In reading him, I find the same thoughts, the same spirit that is in me, but he takes a step beyond, & illustrates by excellent images that which I should have conveyed in a sleepy generality.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Is Franklin the only man who is lost, that his wife should be so earnest to find him?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .'Tis as if I went into a gymnasium, & saw youths leap, climb, & swing with a force unapproachable, — though their feats are only continuations of my initial grapplings & jumps.^ 'T is as if I went into a gymnasium and saw youths leap, climb, and swing with a force unapproachable, though their feats are only continuations of my initial grapplings and jumps."
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ 'Tis as if I went into a gymnasium, & saw youths leap, climb, & swing with a force unapproachable, — though their feats are only continuations of my initial grapplings & jumps.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But, if I put my head deliberately into the fire, there is no appeal to fire or to the Maker of fire, and I have only myself to blame.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Truly, Nature absorbed his attention, but I don't think he cared much for what is called the beauties of nature; it was her way of working, her mystery, her economy in extravagance; he delighted to trace her footsteps toward their source ....^ Ralph Waldo Emerson in his journal (24 June 1863) Truly, Nature absorbed his attention, but I don't think he cared much for what is called the beauties of nature; it was her way of working, her mystery, her economy in extravagance; he delighted to trace her footsteps toward their source ....
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882.

    ^ [Ralph Waldo Emerson] asked.

    .He liked to feel that the pursuit was endless, with mystery at both ends of it ....^ He liked to feel that the pursuit was endless, with mystery at both ends of it ....
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • He is a singular character — a young man with much of wild original nature still remaining in him; and so far as he is sophisticated, it is in a way and method of his own. He is as ugly as sin, long-nosed, queer-mouthed, and with uncouth and rustic, though courteous manners, corresponding very well with such an exterior.^ Shall we with pains erect a heaven of blue glass over ourselves, though when it is done we shall be sure to gaze still at the true ethereal heaven far above, as if the former were not?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Though Channing remained in Concord most of his life, Hawthorne at that time stayed but two years.
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let him turn which way he will, it falls opposite to the sun; short at noon, long at eve.
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    .But his ugliness is of an honest and agreeable fashion, and becomes him much better than beauty.^ But his ugliness is of an honest and agreeable fashion, and becomes him much better than beauty.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A man's ignorance sometimes is not only useful, but beautiful-while his knowledge, so called, is oftentimes worse than useless, besides being ugly.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .He was educated, I believe, at Cambridge, and formerly kept school in this town; but for two or three years back, he has repudiated all regular modes of getting a living, and seems inclined to lead a sort of Indian life among civilized men — an Indian life, I mean, as respects the absence of any systematic effort for a livelihood.^ What sort of life were that to live?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He was educated, I believe, at Cambridge, and formerly kept school in this town; but for two or three years back, he has repudiated all regular modes of getting a living, and seems inclined to lead a sort of Indian life among civilized men — an Indian life, I mean, as respects the absence of any systematic effort for a livelihood.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.

    ... Mr. Thoreau is a keen and delicate observer of nature — a genuine observer — which, I suspect, is almost as rare a character as even an original poet; and Nature, in return for his love, seems to adopt him as her especial child, and shows him secrets which few others are allowed to witness. .
  • Among American writers Thoreau was the pioneer of nature-study. Audubon had preceded him but he worked mainly with the brush; to multitudes Thoreau opened the gate to the secrets of our natural environment.^ Audubon had preceded him but he worked mainly with the brush; to multitudes Thoreau opened the gate to the secrets of our natural environment.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nathaniel Hawthorne , in his Journal entry for (1 September 1842) Among American writers Thoreau was the pioneer of nature-study.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Citizen Watches The Non-Conformists: American Romanticism's Founding Fathers With the help of Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Emerson pioneered the overarching concept for American Romanticism in the 19th century: Non-conformity.

    .The subtle delicacy of the grass-blade, the crystals of the snowflake, the icicle, the marvel of the weird lines traced by the flocks of wild geese athwart the heavens as they migrated, these he watched and recorded with loving accuracy and sensitive poetic feeling as no one in our land before had done.^ The subtle delicacy of the grass-blade, the crystals of the snowflake, the icicle, the marvel of the weird lines traced by the flocks of wild geese athwart the heavens as they migrated, these he watched and recorded with loving accuracy and sensitive poetic feeling as no one in our land before had done.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One would think twice before he accepted Heaven on such terms."
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I saw that, if there was a wall of stone between me and my townsmen, there was a still more difficult one to climb or break through, before they could get to be as free as I was.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .I have thrown a stone upon the cairn at Walden Pond which has now grown so high through the tributes of his grateful admirers.^ I have thrown a stone upon the cairn at Walden Pond which has now grown so high through the tributes of his grateful admirers.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I shall throw still others in grateful admiration if the opportunity comes to me.^ I shall throw still others in grateful admiration if the opportunity comes to me.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • James Kendall Hosmer in The Last Leaf : Observations, during Seventy-five Years, of Men and Events in America and Europe (1912), Ch.^ Here is Thoreau's word seventy-five years ago.
      • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ James Kendall Hosmer in The Last Leaf : Observations, during Seventy-five Years, of Men and Events in America and Europe (1912) , Ch.
      • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The interesting and original methods of teaching during the last thirty years recall those of the brothers; and where is corporal punishment?
      • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

      .8 "Poets and Prophets"
  • Thoreau’s thin, penetrating, big-nosed face, even in a bad woodcut, conveys some hint of the limitations of his mind and character.^ "Poets and Prophets" Thoreau’s thin, penetrating, big-nosed face, even in a bad woodcut, conveys some hint of the limitations of his mind and character.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Have the conduct and words of most poets, prophets, even of the founders of the great religions, been considered sagacious "on 'Change"?
    • "Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend" by Edward Emerson 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC www.vcu.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It has been the muse for many poets such as William Wordsworth, Henry David Thoreau and even Ralph Waldo Emerson.

    .With his almost acid sharpness of insight, with his almost animal dexterity in act, there went none of that large, unconscious geniality of the world’s heroes.^ With his almost acid sharpness of insight, with his almost animal dexterity in act, there went none of that large, unconscious geniality of the world’s heroes.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There are none happy in the world but beings who enjoy freely a vast horizon,said Damodara, when his herds required new and larger pastures.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .He was not easy, not ample, not urbane, not even kind; his enjoyment was hardly smiling, or the smile was not broad enough to be convincing; he had no waste lands nor kitchen-midden in his nature, but was all improved and sharpened to a point.^ He was not easy, not ample, not urbane, not even kind; his enjoyment was hardly smiling, or the smile was not broad enough to be convincing; he had no waste lands nor kitchen-midden in his nature, but was all improved and sharpened to a point.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We feel at first as if some opportunities of kindness and sympathy were lost, but learn afterward that any pure grief is ample recompense for all.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is naked Nature,--inhumanly sincere, wasting no thought on man, nibbling at the cliffy shore where gulls wheel amid the spray."
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ."He was bred to no profession," says Emerson; "he never married; he lived alone; he never went to church; he never voted; he refused to pay a tax to the State; he ate no flesh, he drank no wine, he never knew the use of tobacco and, though a naturalist, he used neither trap nor gun.^ It is for no particular item in the tax‑ bill that I refuse to pay it.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "He was bred to no profession," says Emerson; "he never married; he lived alone; he never went to church; he never voted; he refused to pay a tax to the State; he ate no flesh, he drank no wine, he never knew the use of tobacco and, though a naturalist, he used neither trap nor gun.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If a thousand men were not to pay their tax-bills this year, that would not be a violent and bloody measure, as it would be to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .When asked at dinner what dish he preferred, he answered, 'the nearest.'"^ When asked at dinner what dish he preferred, he answered, 'the nearest.'"
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .So many negative superiorities begin to smack a little of the prig.^ So many negative superiorities begin to smack a little of the prig.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .From his later works he was in the habit of cutting out the humorous passages, under the impression that they were beneath the dignity of his moral muse; and there we see the prig stand public and confessed.^ From his later works he was in the habit of cutting out the humorous passages, under the impression that they were beneath the dignity of his moral muse; and there we see the prig stand public and confessed.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I did not wish to take a cabin passage, but rather to go before the mast and on the deck of the world, for there I could best see the moonlight amid the mountains.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]
    • Henry David Thoreau quotes, quotations, phrases, words 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.icelebz.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In every threat and in every compliment there was a blunder; for they thought that my chief desire was to stand the other side of that stone wall.
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • A man who must separate himself from his neighbours' habits in order to be happy, is in much the same case with one who requires to take opium for the same purpose.^ Stevenson, Robert Louis, 1850-1894.

    ^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862 .
    • Browse By Author: T - Project Gutenberg 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Franklin Subject Browse Demo 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC devplw.library.upenn.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862.

    .What we want to see is one who can breast into the world, do a man's work, and still preserve his first and pure enjoyment of existence.^ What we want to see is one who can breast into the world, do a man's work, and still preserve his first and pure enjoyment of existence.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The coldness of Nature--"of a force not bound to be kind to man"--precipitated Thoreau into a crisis of identity, which he dramatized in one of his most memorable passages:" .
    • Henry David Thoreau : The Poetry Foundation : Find Poems and Poets. Discover Poetry. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "We are ever dying to one world and being born into another."

    .
    • Robert Louis Stevenson in "Henry David Thoreau: His Character and Opinions", Cornhill Magazine (June 1880)
  • He sounds, as it were, the fatal bottom of our organic existence, and yet claims not merely to accept the universe, as another Transcendentalist, Margaret Fuller, put it, but to rejoice in it. ...^ Stevenson, Robert Louis, 1850-1894.

    ^ Robert Louis Stevenson in "Henry David Thoreau: His Character and Opinions", Cornhill Magazine (June 1880) He sounds, as it were, the fatal bottom of our organic existence, and yet claims not merely to accept the universe, as another Transcendentalist, Margaret Fuller , put it, but to rejoice in it.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thoreau, Henry David, 1817-1862 .

    .To the dark immensity of material Nature's indifference we can oppose only the brief light, like a lamp in a cabin, of our consciousness; the invigorating benison of Walden is to make us feel that the contest is equal, and fair.^ To the dark immensity of material Nature's indifference we can oppose only the brief light, like a lamp in a cabin, of our consciousness; the invigorating benison of Walden is to make us feel that the contest is equal, and fair.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Shall our institutions be like those chestnut-burs which contain abortive nuts, perfect only to prick the fingers?
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The finest qualities of our nature, like the bloom on fruits, can be preserved only by the most delicate handling.
    • Henry David Thoreau Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It has emerged over time as one of the great testaments of American individualism, assuring the New World, traditional reassurances failing, of the value, power, and beauty of the unfettered self.^ It has emerged over time as one of the great testaments of American individualism, assuring the New World, traditional reassurances failing, of the value, power, and beauty of the unfettered self.
    • Henry David Thoreau - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This American government,‑‑what is it but a tradition, though a recent one, endeavoring to transmit itself unimpaired to posterity, but each instant losing some of its integrity?
    • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.milligan.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In one single location you can actively explore key events in American history, follow the lore of literature or enjoy the beauty of nature.

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1817-1862), American recluse, naturalist and writer, was born at Concord, Massachusetts, on the 12th of July 1817. To Thoreau this Concord country contained all of beauty and even grandeur that was necessary to the worshipper of nature: he once journeyed to Canada; he went west on one occasion; he sailed and explored a few rivers; for the rest, he haunted Concord and its neighbourhood as faithfully as the stork does its ancestral nest.^ Get alerts about Henry David Thoreau .
  • Henry David Thoreau Topics Page - USATODAY.com 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC content.usatoday.com [Source type: News]

^ "Writer, philosopher, and naturalist Henry David Thoreau was born on July 12, 1817, in Concord, Massachusetts.
  • D-Clips: Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC faculty.uml.edu [Source type: General]

^ Henry David Thoreau, photograph, detail .

.John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey, who, in Boston, married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.^ John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey , who, in Boston , married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.

^ Mona) man , was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of See also: JERSEY JERSEY, EARLS OF Jersey , who, in See also: BOSTON BOSTON, THOMAS (1676-1732) Boston , married a Scottish See also: LADY (0.
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey, who, in Boston, married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.This last-named John was the son of Philippe Thoreau and his wife Marie le Gallais, persons of pure French blood, settled at St Helier, in Jersey.^ This last-named John was the son of Philippe Thoreau and his wife See also: MARIE Marie le Gallais, persons of pure See also: FRENCH FRENCH, DANIEL CHESTER (1850– ) FRENCH, NICHOLAS (1604-1678) French See also: BLOOD blood , settled at St Helier, in Jersey .
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ This last-named John was the son of Philippe Thoreau and his wife Marie le Gallais, persons of pure French blood, settled at St Helier, in Jersey.
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Born on the Isle of Jersey, John Thoreau came to America in 1773, became a successful merchant in Boston, and in 1799 bought property in Concord, where he moved his family.
  • Books from the Library of Henry David Thoreau, 1776-1869. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.concordlibrary.org [Source type: Academic]

.From his New England Puritan mother, from his Scottish grandmother, from his Jersey-American grandfather and from his remoter French ancestry Thoreau inherited distinctive traits: the Saxon element perhaps predominated, but the " hauntings of Celtism " were prevalent and potent.^ From his New England Puritan mother, from his Scottish grandmother, from his Jersey-American grandfather and from his remoter French ancestry Thoreau inherited distinctive traits: the Saxon element perhaps predominated, but the " hauntings of Celtism " were prevalent and potent.
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Celtism " were prevalent and potent .
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ From his New England Puritan See also: MOTHER mother , from his Scottish grandmother, from his Jersey-American grandfather and from his remoter French ancestry Thoreau inherited distinctive traits: the Saxon See also: ELEMENT (Lat.
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.The stock of the Thoreaus was a robust one; and in Concord the family, though never wealthy nor officially influential, was ever held in peculiar respect.^ The stock of the Thoreaus was a robust one; and in Concord the See also: FAMILY family , though never wealthy nor officially influential, was ever held in See also: PECULIAR peculiar respect .
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ The stock of the Thoreaus was a robust one; and in Concord the family, though never wealthy nor officially influential, was ever held in peculiar respect.
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Born in 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts, Henry David Thoreau did not enjoy the advantages of a well-to-do family, but he worked his way through Harvard, graduating in 1837.
  • 13: Henry David Thoreau, Transcendentalism in Action 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.uncp.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.As a boy, Henry drove his mother's cow to the pastures, and thus early became enamoured of certain aspects of nature and of certain delights of solitude.^ As a boy, Henry drove his mother's cow to the pastures, and thus early became enamoured of certain aspects of nature and of certain delights of solitude.
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ As a boy Thoreau was often called upon to drive his mother's cows to and from their grazing pastures and developed an early love of solitude and communion with nature.
  • Henry David Thoreau biography Transcendentalism Walden 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.age-of-the-sage.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ During the late 1960's and early 70's, conservation of our natural resources became very popular, and Henry David Thoreau has been cited by some as the "Father of Conservation."
  • Henry David Thoreau | Literary Kicks 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.litkicks.com [Source type: General]
  • Henry David Thoreau | Literary Kicks 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.litkicks.com [Source type: General]

.At school and at Harvard University he in nowise distinguished himself, though he was an intelligently receptive student; he became, however, proficient enough in Greek, Latin, and the more general acquirements to enable him to act for a time as a master.^ At school and at Harvard University he in nowise distinguished himself, though he was an intelligently receptive student; he became, however, proficient enough in Greek, Latin, and the more general acquirements to enable him to act for a time as a master.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At school and at Harvard University he in nowise distinguished himself, though he was an intelligently receptive student; he became, however, proficient enough in Greek, Latin , and the more general acquirements to enable him to act for a time as a master.

^ At school and at Harvard University he in nowise distinguished himself, though he was an intelligently receptive student; he became, however, proficient enough in See also: GREEK GREEK, ETRUSCAN AND Greek , Latin, and the more See also: GENERAL GENERAL (Lat.
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

.But long before this he had become apprenticed to the learning of nature in preference to that of man: when only twelve years of age he had made collections for Agassiz, who had then just arrived in America, and already the meadows and the hedges and the stream-sides had become cabinets of rare knowledge to him.^ But See also: LONG, GEORGE (1800-1879) LONG, JOHN DAVIS (1838– ) long before this he had become apprenticed to the learning of nature in preference to that of man: when only twelve years of See also: AGE (Fr.
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ See also: AMERICA America , and already the meadows and the hedges and the stream-sides had become cabinets of rare knowledge to him .
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ But long before this he had become apprenticed to the learning of nature in preference to that of man: when only twelve years of age he had made collections for Agassiz, who had then just arrived in America, and already the meadows and the hedges and the stream-sides had become cabinets of rare knowledge to him.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.On the desertion of schoolmastering as a profession, Thoreau became a lecturer and author, though it was the labour of his hands which mainly supported him through many years of his life: professionally he was a surveyor.^ On the desertion of schoolmastering as a profession, Thoreau became a lecturer and author, though it was the labour of his hands which mainly supported him through many years of his life: professionally he was a surveyor.
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On the desertion of schoolmastering as a profession, Thoreau became a lecturer and author, though it was the labor of his hands which mainly supported him through many years of his life: professionally he was a surveyor.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]

^ During Thoreau’s two-year residency in his house at Walden Pond, he finished his manuscript about the 1839 river trip, but he also generated many notes for another book about his experience away from village life.
  • The Thoreau Society: Writings of Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC 209.200.116.65 [Source type: Academic]

.In the effort to reduce the practice of economy to a fine art he arrived at the conviction that the less labour a man did, over and above the positive demands of necessity, the better for him and for the community at large; he would have had the order of the week reversed - six days of rest for one of labour.^ In the effort to reduce the practice of economy to a fine art he arrived at the conviction that the less labor a man did, over and above the positive demands of necessity, the better for him and for the community at large; he would have had the order of the week reversed -- six days of rest for one of labor.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the effort to reduce the practice of economy to a fine art he arrived at the conviction that the less labour a man did, over and above the positive demands of necessity, the better for him and for the community at large; he would have had the order of the week reversed - six days of rest for one of labour.
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thoreau figured out that six weeks of work a year, provided the money he needed to live on, and the rest of the time was his own to live, to write, and to observe nature.

.It was in 1845 he made the now famous experiment of Walden.^ It was in 1845 he made the now famous experiment of Walden.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ From his experiences he produced his famous work Walden.
  • Henry David Thoreau - MSN Encarta 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC encarta.msn.com [Source type: General]
  • Henry David Thoreau - MSN Encarta 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC ca.encarta.msn.com [Source type: General]

^ His most famous book, Walden (1854), is an elegantly penned account of his own experiment in near-solitary living in close harmony with nature.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC amsaw.org [Source type: Original source]

.Desirous of proving to himself and others that man could be as independent of this kind as the nest-building bird, Thoreau retired to a hut of his own construction on the pine-slope over against the shores of Walden Pond - a but which he built, furnished and kept in order entirely by the labour of his own hands.^ Thoreau's own 1846 survey map of Walden Pond .
  • Walden Pond Photographs 15 September 2009 14:48 UTC thoreau.eserver.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Desirous of proving to himself and others that man could be as independent of this kind as the nest-building bird, Thoreau retired to a hut of his own construction on the pine-slope over against the shores of Walden Pond - a hut which he built, furnished and kept in order entirely by the labour of his own hands.
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Desirous of proving to himself and others that man could be as independent of this kind as the nest-building bird, Thoreau retired to a hut of his own construction on the pine-slope over against the shores of Walden Pond -- a hut which he built, furnished and kept in order entirely by the labor of his own hands.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]

.During the two years of his residence in Walden woods he lived by the exercise of a little surveying, a little job-work and the tillage of a few acres of ground which produced him his beans and potatoes.^ During the two years of his residence in Walden woods he lived by the exercise of a little surveying, a little job-work and the tillage of a few acres of ground which produced him his beans and potatoes.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His most famous book is Walden , which tells the story of his two years living in the woods.
  • Henry David Thoreau@Everything2.com 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: Original source]

^ During his two years on Walden...
  • Henry David Thoreau Lesson Plans - LessonCorner 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.lessoncorner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.His absolute independence was as little gained as if he had camped out in Hyde Park; relatively he lived the life of a recluse.^ His absolute independence was as little gained as if he had camped out in Hyde Park; relatively he lived the life of a recluse.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His absolute independence was as little gained as if he had camped out in Hyde Park ; relatively he lived the life of a recluse.

^ In 1845, in Concord, Massachusetts, he abandoned the comforts of civilization to live a reclusive life in a cabin on Walden Pond.
  • Henry David Thoreau Lesson Plans - LessonCorner 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.lessoncorner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

He read considerably, wrote abundantly, thought actively if not widely, and came to know beasts, birds and fishes with an intimacy more extraordinary than was the case with St Francis of Assisi. .Birds came at his call, and forgot their hereditary fear of man; beasts lipped and caressed him; the very fish in lake and stream would glide, unfearful, between his hands.^ Birds came at his call, and forgot their hereditary fear of man; beasts lipped and caressed him; the very fish in lake and stream would glide, unfearful, between his hands.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The very fact that he had no rabble or troop of hirelings about him would alone distinguish him from ordinary heroes.
  • Henry David Thoreau Quotes 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.quotesby.net [Source type: Original source]

^ He kept very thourough journals of natural history and the citizens of Concord regarded him as the town naturalist and would ask him many questions regarding nature, or call on him to identify interesting creatures and plants.
  • Henry David Thoreau - Poems and Biography by AmericanPoems.com 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.americanpoems.com [Source type: General]
  •  Henry David Thoreau, Biographical Notes                                                                                                     17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nbu.bg [Source type: Original source]

.This exquisite familiarity with bird and beast would make us love the memory of Thoreau if his egotism were triply as arrogant, if his often meaningless paradoxes were even more absurd, if his sympathies were even less humanitarian than we know them to have been.^ Perhaps not, but Thoreau's deflations are often paradoxes.
  • Sample Chapter for Thoreau, H.D.; Moldenhauer, J.J., ed.: The Maine Woods. 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC press.princeton.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I don't know what Thoreau would make of all this.

^ This exquisite familiarity with bird and beast would make us love the memory of Thoreau if his egotism were triply as arrogant, if his often meaningless paradoxes were even more absurd, if his sympathies were even less humanitarian than we know them to have been.
  • Henry David Thoreau 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.nndb.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau - LoveToKnow 1911 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1911encyclopedia.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Henry David Thoreau, American writer, philosopher and naturalist (1817-62) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.His Walden, the record of this fascinating two years' experience,.^ It is from the experiences of these two years that Thoreau wrote his masterpiece, Walden .
  • PAL: Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.csustan.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • PAL: Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) 19 September 2009 19:50 UTC www.csustan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ During his two years on Walden...
  • Henry David Thoreau Lesson Plans - LessonCorner 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.lessoncorner.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His Walden, the record of this fascinating two years' experience,.

must always remain a production of great interest and considerable psychological value. .Some years before Thoreau took to Walden woods he made the chief friendship of his life, that with Emerson.^ Some years before Thoreau took to Walden woods he made the See also: CHIEF (from Fr.
  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... - Online Information article about HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC encyclopedia.jrank.org [Source type: General]

^ Seven years later, in 1854, Thoreau published Walden, or Life in the Woods.
  • Henry David Thoreau Biography - Philosophers 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.woopidoo.com [Source type: News]

^ Walden: thoreau in the woods .
  • Henry David Thoreau - Kosmix : Reference, Videos, Images, News, Shopping and more... 17 January 2010 1:58 UTC www.kosmix.com [Source type: General]