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Henry Moore Teller


In office
April 18, 1882 – March 3, 1885
President Chester A. Arthur
Preceded by Samuel J. Kirkwood
Succeeded by Lucius Q.C. Lamar

In office
November 15, 1876 – April 17, 1882
March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1909
Preceded by None
Nathaniel P. Hill
Succeeded by George M. Chilcott
Charles J. Hughes, Jr.

Born May 23, 1830(1830-05-23)
Granger, New York
Died February 23, 1914 (aged 83)
Denver, Colorado
Resting place Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Colorado
Political party Republican (1876-1897)
Silver Republican (1897-1903)
Democratic (1903-1909)
Military service
Service/branch Colorado Militia
Years of service 1862-1864
Rank Major General

Henry Moore Teller (1830-1914) was a U.S. politician. Secretary of the Interior between 1882 and 1885.

Contents

Biography

He served in the Senate and Cabinet for over thirty years, and was connected with the Free Silver question, beginning in 1880. During that time, he did much in and out of Congress with tongue and pen. In 1892, he was instrumental in securing in the Republican National Convention a declaration in favor of bimetallism, and he was a conspicuous actor in the prolonged fight in the senate against unconditional repeal. His standing in the Republican party, together with his great ability and high character, made him the leader of the Silver Republican Party.[1]

Henry Moore Teller

At the Republican National Convention of 1896 in St. Louis, he was at the head of the revolt against the Republican platform and his withdrawal from the party that year cost the Republican candidate thousands of votes. The silver Republicans favored his nomination for the Presidency, and his state of Colorado voted for him on the first ballot in the Democratic Convention. After the nomination had been made he joined with other leading Silver Republicans in an address supporting the Democratic ticket. Unlike many other Silver Republicans, Teller never returned to the Republican Party and served as a Democratic senator for the rest of his career, becoming one of few politicians to switch parties. Teller helped the Democratic Party gain more power in Colorado, which was previously dominated by Republicans.

Historically, Teller is probably best known for sponsoring an amendment to the Joint Resolution for war with Spain, passed by the House and Senate on April 19, 1898. As Secretary of the Interior he promulgated an Indian Religious Crimes Code that sought to prohibit Native American ceremonial activity throughout the United States. Teller died February 23, 1914, and is buried at Fairmount Cemetery in Denver, CO.

See also

References

  1. ^ U.S. Senate: Art & History Home > People > Senators > Senators Who Changed Parties During Senate Service (Since 1890)

External links

United States Senate
Preceded by
none
United States Senator (Class 2) from Colorado
1876–1882
Served alongside: Jerome B. Chaffee, Nathaniel P. Hill
Succeeded by
George M. Chilcott
Preceded by
Nathaniel P. Hill
United States Senator (Class 3) from Colorado
1885–1909
Served alongside: Thomas M. Bowen, Edward O. Wolcott, Thomas M. Patterson, Simon Guggenheim
Succeeded by
Charles J. Hughes, Jr.
Political offices
Preceded by
Samuel J. Kirkwood
United States Secretary of the Interior
1882–1885
Succeeded by
Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar
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Template:Infobox US Cabinet official

Henry Moore Teller (1830-1914) was a U.S. politician. Secretary of the Interior between 1882 and 1885.

Contents

Biography

He served in the Senate and Cabinet for over thirty years, and was connected with the Free Silver question, beginning in 1880. During that time, he did much in and out of Congress with tongue and pen. In 1892, he was instrumental in securing in the Republican National Convention a declaration in favor of bimetallism, and he was a conspicuous actor in the prolonged fight in the senate against unconditional repeal. His standing in the Republican party, together with his great ability and high character, made him the leader of the Silver Republican Party.[1]


At the Republican National Convention of 1896 in St. Louis, he was at the head of the revolt against the Republican platform and his withdrawal from the party that year cost the Republican candidate thousands of votes. The silver Republicans favored his nomination for the Presidency, and his state of Colorado voted for him on the first ballot in the Democratic Convention. After the nomination had been made he joined with other leading Silver Republicans in an address supporting the Democratic ticket. Unlike many other Silver Republicans, Teller never returned to the Republican Party and served as a Democratic senator for the rest of his career, becoming one of few politicians to switch parties. Teller helped the Democratic Party gain more power in Colorado, which was previously dominated by Republicans.

Historically, Teller is probably best known for sponsoring an amendment to the Joint Resolution for war with Spain, passed by the House and Senate on April 19, 1898. As Secretary of the Interior he promulgated an Indian Religious Crimes Code that sought to prohibit Native American ceremonial activity throughout the United States. Teller died February 23, 1914.

See also

References

  1. U.S. Senate: Art & History Home > People > Senators > Senators Who Changed Parties During Senate Service (Since 1890)

External links

Template:Start box |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #cccccc" | United States Senate |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
none |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"| United States Senator (Class 2) from Colorado
1876–1882
Served alongside: Jerome B. Chaffee, Nathaniel P. Hill |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
George M. Chilcott |- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Nathaniel P. Hill |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"| United States Senator (Class 3) from Colorado
1885–1909
Served alongside: Thomas M. Bowen, Edward O. Wolcott, Thomas M. Patterson, Simon Guggenheim |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Charles J. Hughes, Jr. |- |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #ccccff;" | Political offices

|- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Samuel J. Kirkwood |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|United States Secretary of the Interior
1882–1885 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar |- Template:End box


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