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Henry Thomas Rainey


In office
March 9, 1933 – August 19, 1934
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by John N. Garner
Succeeded by Joseph W. Byrns, Sr.

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 20th district
In office
March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1921
March 4, 1923 – August 19, 1934
Preceded by James R. Williams
Guy L. Shaw
Succeeded by Guy L. Shaw
Scott W. Lucas

Born August 20, 1860
Carrollton, Illinois
Died August 19, 1934 (aged 73)
St. Louis, Missouri
Political party Democratic
Alma mater Knox College
Amherst College
Union College of Law
Profession Law

Henry Thomas Rainey (August 20, 1860–August 19, 1934) was a prominent U.S. politician during the first third of the 20th century. He served in the United States House of Representatives from 1903 to 1921 and from 1923 to his death as a Democrat from Illinois, and was its Speaker during the famous Hundred days of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933.

Contents

Biography

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Early years

Rainey attended the public schools and Knox Academy and Knox College, Galesburg, Ill. he transferred to, and graduated from Amherst College in 1883 and then the Union College of Law, in Chicago which he graduated in 1885. He was admitted to the bar in 1885 and commenced practice in Carrollton, Ill.

Political career

Rainey was appointed master in chancery for Greene County, Ill., from 1887 until 1895, when he resigned, and returned to private practice. He then decided to return to politics in 1902 getting elected to Congress and serving for nine terms before losing to Guy L. Shaw in 1920. Two years later, he won back his seat and served until his death.

Leadership

Due to the Great Depression, the Republican party lost its majority in a landslide, and, with John Nance Garner elevated to the Speakership, Rainey ran for, and defeated John McDuffie for the Majority leadership. McDuffie remained as Whip.

Speaker of the House

statue of Henry T. Rainey, north of Carrollton Illinois

With Speaker Garner having been inaugurated Vice President on March 4, 1933, Rainey, being next in line, was elected Speaker of the House when President Roosevelt called a special session of Congress two days later. Rainey gave the Roosevelt administration carte blache to do whatever it wanted. allowing almost the entire New Deal to be passed with little or no changes.

More reforms were passed during the regular session starting December. Rainey died of a heart attack the following summer, before the new Congress could meet.

References

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Nance Garner
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
March 9, 1933 – August 19, 1934
Succeeded by
Joseph W. Byrns
Party political offices
Preceded by
John Q. Tilson
Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives
December 7, 1931-March 3, 1933
Succeeded by
Joseph W. Byrns

Template:Infobox Officeholder

Henry Thomas Rainey (August 20, 1860August 19, 1934) was a prominent U.S. politician during the first third of the 20th century. He served in the United States House of Representatives from 1903 to 1921 and from 1923 to his death as a Democrat from Illinois, and was its Speaker during the famous Hundred days of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933.

Contents

Biography

Early years

Rainey attended the public schools and Knox Academy and Knox College, Galesburg, Ill. he transferred to, and graduated from Amherst College in 1883 and then the Union College of Law, in Chicago which he graduated in 1885. He was admitted to the bar in 1885 and commenced practice in Carrollton, Ill.

Political career

Rainey was appointed master in chancery for Greene County, Ill., from 1887 until 1895, when he resigned, and returned to private practice. He then decided to return to politics in 1902 getting elected to Congress and serving for nine terms before losing to Guy L. Shaw in 1920. Two years later, he won back his seat and served until his death.

Leadership

Due to the Great Depression, the Republican party lost its majority in a landslide, and, with John Nance Garner elevated to the Speakership, Rainey ran for, and defeated John McDuffie for the Majority leadership. McDuffie remained as Whip.

Speaker of the House

With Speaker Garner having been inaugurated Vice President on March 4,1933, Rainey, being next in line, was elected Speaker of the House when President Roosevelt called a special session of Congress two days later. Rainey gave the Roosevelt administration carte blache to do whatever it wanted. allowing almost the entire New Deal to be passed with little or no changes.

More reforms were passed during the regular session starting December. Rainey died of a heart attack the following summer, before the new Congress could meet.

References

External links

Template:Start box |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #cccccc" | United States House of Representatives |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
John Nance Garner |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
March 9, 1933August 19, 1934 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Joseph W. Byrns |- |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #FFBF00;" | Party political offices

|- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
John Q. Tilson |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives
December 7, 1931-March 3, 1933 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Joseph W. Byrns |- Template:End box

Template:SpeakerUSHouse


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