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Facsimile of the first page of The Life of King Henry the Eighth from the First Folio, published in 1623
.The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eighth is a history play by William Shakespeare, based on the life of Henry VIII of England.^ Henry ll England, King of .

^ Henry 11 Plantagenet King England .

^ Henry Plantagenet ll King of England .

.An alternative title, All is True, is recorded in contemporary documents, the title Henry VIII not appearing until the play's publication in the First Folio of 1623. Stylistic evidence indicates that the play was written by Shakespeare in collaboration with, or revised by, his successor, John Fletcher.^ Hey Henry, while apologizing, how about apologizing to all women for their suffering and being denied the right to vote until 1920?

^ Hey Henry, if the police want to make extra money, all they have to do is sit and wait at the County high schools until the 3:35 dismissal time.

^ They've all been found and documented; there are no "lost" cemeteries to be found in Henry County.

It is also somewhat characteristic of the late romances in its structure.
During a performance of Henry VIII at the Globe Theatre in 1613, a cannon shot employed for special effects ignited the theatre's thatched roof (and the beams), burning the original building to the ground.

Contents

Sources

As usual in his history plays, Shakespeare relied primarily on Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles to achieve his dramatic ends and to accommodate official sensitivities over the materials involved.[1] Shakespeare not only telescoped events that occurred over a span of two decades, but jumbled their actual order. .The play implies, without stating it directly, that the treason charges against the Duke of Buckingham were false and trumped up; and it maintains a comparable ambiguity about other sensitive issues.^ Hey Henry, the poster was not complaining about "y'all" he was simply stating that "you guys" is the same as "y'all" in other parts of the country.

.The disgrace and beheading of Anne Boleyn (here spelled Bullen) is carefully avoided, and no indication of the succeeding four wives of Henry VIII can be found in the play.^ Hey Henry, does anyone remember a hoard of gold coins being found here in Henry county in the last 20 to 30 years?

^ No; I'll no Anne Bullens for him; There's more in't than fair visage.
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^ Hey Henry, here it is a school holiday, kids outside playing, enjoying the beautiful weather and what does Stormwater do?

However, Katherine of Aragon's plea to Henry before the Legatine Court seems to have been taken straight from historical record.

Date and performances

.Most modern scholars date Henry VIII to 1613, the year in which the Globe Theatre burned down during one of the play's earliest known performances.^ Hey Henry, yes, to most of us the inflatables on Racetrack Rd are tacky...but my 2 year old thinks they are beautiful!

^ The HCHS theatre department won first place in region 4AAA with their one act play, "Hush Little Celia, Don't Say a Word."

^ A rodeo happens once a year in Henry County, most schools want to have their graduation at their own schools.

One contemporary report states that the play was relatively new at the time of the fire, having "been acted not passing 2 or 3 times before".[2 ]
.Before the discovery of this evidence, most leading 18th and 19th century scholars, including Samuel Johnson, Lewis Theobald, George Steevens, Edmund Malone and James Halliwell-Philips, dated the play's composition to before 1603, claiming that the pro-Tudor nature of the play makes it highly unlikely it would appear during the reign of King James, whose mother was beheaded by the Tudors.^ Hey Henry, I would like to thank Most of the Salvation Army staff and volunteers for making my community service there a good experience.

^ Great-belli'd women, That had not half a week to go, like rams In the old time of war, would shake the press And make 'em reel before 'em.
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^ First, it was usual with him, every day It would infect his speech, that if the King Should without issue die, he'll carry it so To make the sceptre his.
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[3] .However, plays offering positive portrayals of major Tudor figures like Henry VIII (When You See Me You Know Me, 1605) and Queen Elizabeth (If You Know Not Me, You Know Nobody, also 1605) were in fact performed, published, and re-published throughout the Stuart era.^ Go see any play by the Henry Players and you will not be disappointed.

^ We liked seeing you eat that bug, too!

^ Queen Elizabeth Plantagenet tudor of England .

[4]
Henry VIII is one of the twenty or so Shakespearean plays for which an early performance can be precisely dated.[5] .In the case of Henry VIII, the performance is especially noteworthy because of the fire that destroyed the Globe Theatre during the performance, as described in several contemporary documents.^ Hey Henry, remember that especially during the holidays we have a lot of visitors here.

^ The fire during the Christmas holidays burnt down five homes instead of just a couple, because they were so close.

These confirm that the fire took place on June 29, 1613.[2 ]
.Fifteen years to the day after the fire, on June 29, 1628, The King's Men performed the play again at the Globe.^ We need to have an appreciation day for our police and fire departments a least once a year.

The performance was witnessed by George Villiers, the contemporary Duke of Buckingham, who left halfway through, once the play's Duke of Buckingham was executed. (A month later, Villiers was assassinated.)[6]
One often reported tradition associated with the play involves John Downes, promptor of the Duke of York's Company from 1662 to 1706. In his Roscius Anglicanus (1708),[7] Downes claims that the role of Henry VIII in this play was originally performed by John Lowin, who "had his instructions from Mr. Shakespeare himself."[8] However, the personal involvement of "Mr. Shakespeare" has not been substantiated by any contemporary source.
During the Restoration era, Sir William Davenant staged a production, starring Thomas Betterton, that was seen by Pepys. .Subsequent stagings of the play by David Garrick, Charles Kean, Henry Irving (who chose to play Wolsey, the villain and perhaps the showier role of the play, in 1888, with Ellen Terry as the noble Katherine of Aragon), and Herbert Beerbohm Tree grew ever more elaborate in their exploitation of the play's pageantry.^ Charles, I will play no more to-night.
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^ Hey Henry, To the parents of the students who attend HCHS. The Principal stated "that enforcing the dress code at the school is more important than the students education."

^ Hey Henry, who picked out the vulgar and way too loud music playing at Avalon Park while Little Leagues played football?

[9]
Since the nineteenth century, however, the play has fallen from favour, and productions of it remain extremely rare. .The positive critical response to a recent production (1996-1997) by the Royal Shakespeare Company, however, indicates that the play may be more stageworthy than its current reputation suggests.^ Now An honest country lord, as I am, beaten A long time out of play, may bring his plainsong And have an hour of hearing; and, by 'r Lady, Held current music too.
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^ In the meantime, I will go and play with my 4 soul-filled dogs who I am sure probably deserve heaven a little more than some.

^ Per the Consumer Product Safety Commission: more children have suffocated on uninflated balloons and pieces of broken balloons than on any other type of toy.

Authorship

.The play is generally believed to be a collaboration between Shakespeare and John Fletcher, the writer who replaced him as the principal playwright of the King's Men.^ Why the devil, Upon this French going out, took he upon him, Without the privity o' the King, to appoint Who should attend on him?
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^ The Archbishop Is the King's hand and tongue; and who dare speak One syllable against him?
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^ As I am made without him, so I'll stand, If the King please; his curses and his blessings Touch me alike, they'are breath I not believe in.
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.There is no contemporary evidence for this; the evidence lies in the style of the verse, which in some scenes appears closer to Fletcher's typical style than Shakespeare's.^ An if there be No great offence belongs to't, give your friend Some touch of your late business.
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^ Appears no employee there is over 25 and has no clue on how to run the place.

^ I say again, there is no English soul More stronger to direct you than yourself, If with the sap of reason you would quench, Or but allay, the fire of passion.
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It is also not known whether Fletcher's involvement can be characterized as collaboration or revision.
.The possibility of collaboration with Fletcher was first raised by James Spedding, an expert on Francis Bacon, in 1850.[10] Spedding and other early commentators relied on a range of distinctive features in Fletcher's style and language preferences, which they saw in the Shakespearean play.^ And on the other hand I also want to thank them for allowing our medical premiums to rise by 10%, thus giving us a negative 7% raise.

For the next century the question of dual authorship was controversial, with more evidence accumulating in favor of the collaborative hypothesis. In 1966, Erdman and Fogel could write that "today a majority of scholars accept the theory of Fletcher's partial authorship, though a sturdy minority deny it."[11]
.An influential stylistic or stylometric study was undertaken by Cyrus Hoy, who in 1962 divided the play between Shakespeare and Fletcher based on their distinctive word choices, for example Fletcher's uses of ye for you and 'em for them.^ Hey Henry, just a reminder to those of you who use Iris Lake Road in McDonough as a cut through.

^ For us, if you please To trust us in your business, we are ready To use our utmost studies in your service.
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^ Hey Henry, the people who want to protect the environment only whine and cry because yes it might not kill you, but it will kill your children or theirs.

[12] In the mid-nineteenth century, James Spedding had proposed a similar division based on the use of eleven-syllable lines; he arrived at the same conclusions Hoy would reach a century later.[13] The Spedding-Hoy division is generally accepted, although subsequent studies have questioned some of its details.[14]
The most common delineation of the two poets' shares in the play is this:
Shakespeare: Act I, scenes i and ii; II,iii and iv; III,ii, lines 1-203 (to exit of King); V,i.
Fletcher: Prologue; I,iii; II,i and ii; III,i, and ii, 203-458 (after exit of King); IV,i and ii; V ii–v; Epilogue.[15]

Stage history

.Henry VIII is believed to have been first performed as part of the ceremonies celebrating the marriage of Princess Elizabeth in 1612-1613, although the first recorded performance was on June 29, 1613, when cannon fire called for in Act I, Scene iv (line 49) set fire to the thatched roof of the Globe Theatre and burned it to the ground.^ If a teacher tried to impress their moral values on your child you would probably be first in line to complain and want them fired, so get off it!

^ Hey Henry, to the family in the first part of Wynbrook Subdivision with the dog that barks all night, please show some respect and keep the dog indoors.

^ They fired a cannon salute to honor all U.S. war veterans and the U.S. flag folding ceremony brought tears to my daddy's eyes.

Thomas Betterton played Henry in 1664, and Colley Cibber revived it frequently in the 1720s. .The play's spectacle made it very popular with audiences of the nineteenth century, with Charles Kean staging a particularly elaborate revival in 1815, and Henry Irving counting Cardinal Wolsey amongst his greatest characterizations.^ Hey Henry, the music played during the Easter egg hunt at Nash farms this year was very inappropriate for children's ears!

^ Hey Henry, if you want a fun game to play, stop by the County administration building and count the number of people leaving before 5 p.m.

^ Hey Henry, great play, great acting, and neat how the Henry Players made me think of Monty Python with their tight English Accents.

.The play's popularity has waned in the twentieth century, although Charles Laughton played Henry at Sadler's Wells Theatre in 1933 and Margaret Webster directed it as the inaugural production of her American Repertory Company on Broadway in 1946 with Walter Hampden as Wolsey and Eva Le Gallienne as Katherine.^ Hey Henry, well done, Luella High Theatre Department!

.John Gielgud played Wolsey, Harry Andrews the king and Edith Evans Katharine at Stratford in 1959. The longest Broadway run the play has had is Herbert Beerbohm Tree's 1916 production in which Lyn Harding played Henry and Tree played Wolsey, running 63 performances.^ As a flight attendant, I have seen many Broadway plays and John Gilbert's portrayal of Scrooge was top notch!

^ Hey Henry, so who is behind it all in wanting to play dirty politics instead of running a clean campaign?

Dramatis personae

  • Porter and his Man; Crier; three Gentlemen; Bishops; Lords and Ladies; Spirits; Scribes, Officers, Guards, Attendants

Synopsis

.The play opens with a Prologue, (a figure otherwise unidentified), who stresses that the audience will see a serious play, and appeals to the audience members, "The first and happiest hearers of the town," to "Be sad, as we would make ye."^ Yes, if I make my play.
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^ Therefore, for goodness' sake, and as you are known The first and happiest hearers of the town, Be sad, as we would make ye; think ye see The very persons of our noble story As they were living; think you see them great, And follow'd with the general throng and sweat Of thousand friends; then, in a moment, see How soon this mightiness meets misery; And if you can be merry then, I'll say A man may weep upon his wedding-day.
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^ I especially liked the old crone in the audience who banished two teens talking on their cell phones before the play beganturned out she was part of the troupe.

.Act I opens with a conversation between the Dukes of Norfolk and Buckingham and Lord Abergavenny.^ [Enter the Duke of Norfolk at one door; at the other, the Duke of Buckingham and the Lord Abergavenny.
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^ Sir, My lord the Duke of Buckingham, and Earl Of Hereford, Stafford, and Northampton, I Arrest thee of high treason, in the name Of our most sovereign king.
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^ Duke of Suffolk, Duke of Norfolk, Surrey, Lord Chamberlain, Gardiner, seat themselves in order on each side.
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Their speeches express their mutual resentment over the ruthless power and overweening pride of Cardinal Wolsey. Wolsey passes over the stage with his attendants, and expresses his own hostility toward Buckingham. Later Buckingham is arrested on treason charges— Wolsey's doing.
.The play's second scene introduces King Henry VIII, and shows his reliance on Wolsey as his favorite.^ Henry (VIII, King ofEngland) Tudor .

^ Henry viii Tudor King of England .

^ Henry VIII "King of England" 1509 - 1547 Tudor .

.Queen Katherine enters to protest Wolsey's abuse of the tax system for his own purposes; Wolsey defends himself, but when the King revokes the Cardinal's measures, Wolsey spreads a rumor that he himself is responsible for the King's action.^ Enter Cardinal Wolsey, and takes his state.
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^ [Enter the two Cardinals, Wolsey and Campeius.
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^ Enter the King, leaning on the Cardinal's shoulder, the Nobles, and Sir Thomas Lovell; the Cardinal places himself under the King's feet on his right side.
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.Katherine also challenges the arrest of Buckingham, but Wolsey defends the arrest by producing the Duke's Surveyor, the primary accuser.^ The Duke of Buckingham's surveyor, ha?
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^ Sir, My lord the Duke of Buckingham, and Earl Of Hereford, Stafford, and Northampton, I Arrest thee of high treason, in the name Of our most sovereign king.
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After hearing the Surveyor, the King orders Buckingham's trial to occur.
.At a banquet thrown by Wolsey, the King and his attendants enter in disguise as masquers.^ Enter the King, and others, as masquers, habited like shepherds, usher'd by the Lord Chamberlain.
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.The King dances with Anne Bullen.^ The King chooses Anne Bullen.
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.Two anonymous Gentlemen open Act II, one giving the other an account of Buckingham's treason trial.^ I've heard of other people being asked for "one dollar" also and when they offered to put the gas in their car instead of giving them the cash, they acted insulted and left.

^ Then enter Anne Bullen and divers other Ladies and Gentlemen as guests, at one door; at another door, enter Sir Henry Guildford.
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^ [Enter the Duke of Norfolk at one door; at the other, the Duke of Buckingham and the Lord Abergavenny.
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Buckingham himself enters in custody after his conviction, and makes his farewells to his followers and to the public. .After his exit, the two Gentlemen talk about court gossip, especially Wolsey's hostility toward Katherine.^ I especially liked the old crone in the audience who banished two teens talking on their cell phones before the play beganturned out she was part of the troupe.

^ I was ill at ease as the two dress store employees talked rudely about another employee; two days later, I was again ill at ease as the counter ladies at BK did the same thing!

The next scene shows Wolsey beginning to move against the Queen, while the nobles Norfolk and Suffolk look on critically. Wolsey introduces Cardinal Campeius and Gardiner to the King; Campeius has come to serve as a judge in the trial Wolsey is arranging for Katherine.
.Anne Bullen is shown conversing with the Old Lady who is her attendant.^ Then enter Anne Bullen and divers other Ladies and Gentlemen as guests, at one door; at another door, enter Sir Henry Guildford.
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^ [Enter Anne Bullen and an Old Lady.
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Anne expresses her sympathy at the Queen's troubles; but then the Lord Chamberlain enters to inform her that the King has made her Marchioness of Pembroke. .Once the Lord Chamberlain leaves, the Old Lady jokes about Anne's sudden advancement in the King's favor.^ Last, that the Lady Anne, Whom the King hath in secrecy long married, This day was view'd in open as his queen, Going to chapel; and the voice is now Only about her coronation.
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^ Hey Henry, Fred Thompson is thinking about running for president, is his new wife old enough to be first lady?

^ Enter the King, and others, as masquers, habited like shepherds, usher'd by the Lord Chamberlain.
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A lavishly-staged trial scene portrays Katherine's hearing before the King and his courtiers. Katherine reproaches Wolsey for his machinations against her, and refuses to stay for the proceedings. .But the King defends Wolsey, and states that it was his own doubts about the legitimacy of their marriage that led to the trial.^ For your stubborn answer About the giving back the great seal to us, The King shall know it, and, no doubt, shall thank you.
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Campeius protests that the hearing cannot continue in the Queen's absence, and the King grudgingly adjourns the proceeding. Wolsey and Campeius confront Katherine among her ladies-in-waiting; Katherine makes an emotional protest about her treatment.
Norfolk, Suffolk, Surrey, and the Lord Chamberlain are shown plotting against Wolsey. .A packet of Wolsey's letters to the Pope have been re-directed to the King; the letters show that Wolsey is playing a double game, opposing Henry's planned divorce from Katherine to the Pope while supporting it to the King.^ Hey Henry, if you want a fun game to play, stop by the County administration building and count the number of people leaving before 5 p.m.

^ Go to any game and see a fully stocked team on the opposing side, then look at those poor 7 year olds playing both defense and offense.

^ Hey Henry, I was at the Union Grove vs. Ola High School football game on Friday, and I have just got to say that the half time show was phenomenal!

.The King shows Wolsey his displeasure, and Wolsey for the first time realizes that he has lost Henry's favor.^ A first time native of Henry Co.

^ Hey Henry, How many lives have to be lost before you install a light on King Mill Road and 42Hwy.

^ Hey Henry, has anyone realized that six high school volleyball teams from Henry County advanced to the state sectional competition this year, including first year school Woodland High?

The noblemen mock Wolsey, and the Cardinal sends his follower Cromwell away so that Cromwell will not be brought down in Wolsey's fall from grace.
The two Gentlemen return to observe and comment upon the lavish procession for Anne Bullen's coronation as Queen, which passes over the stage in their presence. .Afterward they are joined by a third Gentleman, who updates them on more court gossip — the rise of Thomas Cromwell in royal favor, and plots against Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury.^ Hey Henry, in answer to the person who questioned why they were more houses being built in the subdivision on Racetrack Road and why they are so close together.

^ I have met more mean spirited so called Christians who speak with such hatred and do nothing but gossip maliciously about other people.

Katherine is shown, ill; she has a vision of dancing spirits. Cardinal Campeius visits her; Katherine expresses her continuing loyalty to the King despite their divorce, and wishes the new Queen well.
.The King summons a nervous Cranmer to his presence, and expresses his support; later, when Cranmer is shown disrespect by the King's Council, Henry reproves them and displays his favor of the churchman.^ Hey Henry, since my City Council person Monta Brown, ignored me I will certainly return the favor on his next run for public office.

Anne Bullen gives birth to a daughter, the future Queen Elizabeth. .In the play's closing scenes, the Porter and his Man complain about trying to control the massive and enthusiastic crowds that attend the infant Elizabeth's christening; another lush procession is followed by a prediction of the glories of the new born princess's future reign, and the play's Epilogue.^ We live in a beautiful part of the country, stop looking for things to complain about and try to enjoy yourself.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ G. Blakemore Evans, general editor, The Riverside Shakespeare, Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1974; p. 977.
  2. ^ a b Gordon McMullan, ed. Henry VIII (London: Thomson, 2000), pp. 57-60.
  3. ^ Anderson, Shakespeare by Another Name. 2004, pgs 403-04
  4. ^ Chambers, Vol. 3, pp. 342, 472.
  5. ^ The Tempest, The Winter's Tale, King Lear, etc.; see the Performance data on the individual plays.
  6. ^ Halliday, F. E. A Shakespeare Companion 1564-1964, Baltimore, Penguin, 1964; pp. 74-5.
  7. ^ Downes' Roscius Anglicanus is an important source of information on the Restoration stage and the traditions it preserved from the early Stuart era. Halliday, p. 140.
  8. ^ Halliday, pp. 218-19.
  9. ^ Halliday, p. 219.
  10. ^ Spedding, James. "Who Wrote Henry VIII?" Gentleman's Magazine, 178 / new series 34, August 1850, pp. 115-23.
  11. ^ Erdman, David V., and Ephraim G. Fogel, eds. Evidence for Authorship: Essays on Problems of Attribution. Ithaca, N.Y., Cornell University Press, 1966; p. 457. For a summary of scholarship to that date, see: pp. 457-78.
  12. ^ Hoy, Cyrus. "The Shares of Fletcher and his Collaborators in the Beaumont and Fletcher Canon." Studies in Bibliography 15 (1962); pp. 71-90.
  13. ^ John M. Berdan and Tucker Brooke, The Life of King Henry the Eighth (Yale UP, 1925), pp. 155-57.
  14. ^ Hope, Jonathan. The Authorship of Shakespeare's Plays. (CUP, 1994) pp. 67-83.
  15. ^ Erdman and Fogel, p. 457.

Further reading

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.Henry VIII (1613) was one of the last plays written by William Shakespeare and was based on the life of Henry VIII of England.^ Henry viii Tudor King of England .

^ Henry VIII "King of England" 1509 - 1547 Tudor .

^ As a white, life long resident of Henry County, I admit I am one of the covert racists.

.An alternative title, All is True, is recorded in contemporary documents, the title Henry VIII not appearing until the play's publication in the First Folio of 1623. Stylistic evidence indicates that the play was written by Shakespeare in collaboration with, or revised by, John Fletcher.^ Facsimile of the first page of The Life of King Henry the Eighth from the First Folio , published in 1623 DRAMATIS PERSONAE (Persons Represented): .
  • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
  • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Hey Henry, while apologizing, how about apologizing to all women for their suffering and being denied the right to vote until 1920?

^ Hey Henry, if the police want to make extra money, all they have to do is sit and wait at the County high schools until the 3:35 dismissal time.

Contents

Act I

.
  • Order gave each thing view.^ All was royal; To the disposing of it nought rebell'd, Order gave each thing view; the office did Distinctly his full function.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Norfolk, scene i
  • No man’s pie is freed
    From his ambitious finger. .
    • Buckingham, scene i
  • Anger is like
    A full-hot horse, who being allow’d his way,
    Self-mettle tires him.^ Anger is like A full hot horse, who being allow'd his way, Self-mettle tires him.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What friend of mine That had to him deriv'd your anger, did I Continue in my liking?
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Norfolk, scene i
  • Be to yourself
    As you would to your friend.^ How would you like it if everybody that came along parked in your front yard or your driveway?

    ^ If you will raise your children and yourself to follow God's standards--what a difference there will be.

    ^ How would you like someone to do that to your front yard?

    .
    • Norfolk, scene i
  • Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
    That it do singe yourself.^ Be advis'd; Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot That it do singe yourself.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Norfolk, scene i
  • ’T is but the fate of place, and the rough brake
    That virtue must go through.^ If I am Traduc'd by ignorant tongues, which neither know My faculties nor person, yet will be The chronicles of my doing, let me say 'Tis but the fate of place, and the rough brake That virtue must go through.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Wolsey, scene ii

Act II

  • The mirror of all courtesy. .
    • 2 Gentleman, scene i
  • This bold bad man.^ Heaven will one day open The King's eyes, that so long have slept upon This bold bad man.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Lord Chamberlain, scene ii
  • ’T is better to be lowly born,
    And range with humble livers in content,
    Than to be perk'd up in a glistering grief,
    And wear a golden sorrow.
    • Anne, scene iii

Act III

.
  • Orpheus, with his lute, made trees,
    And the mountain-tops that freeze,
    Bow themselves when he did sing.
    • Singer, scene i
  • ’T is well said again,
    And ’t is a kind of good deed to say well;
    And yet, words are no deeds.^ I'm sure this comment was made by a person who does nothing to volunteer their time to this organization which gives them absolutely no right to say a word!

    .
    • King Henry, scene ii
  • Read o'er this;
    And after, this: and then to breakfast with
    What appetite you have.^ Henry II (Plantagenet), King ofEngland .

    ^ King HENRY II 12160 v England2 .

    ^ Henry ii "The_lawgiver" Plantagenet King .

    .
    • King Henry, scene ii
  • I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness;
    And, from that full meridian of my glory,
    I haste now to my setting: I shall fall
    Like a bright exhalation in the evening,
    And no man see me more.^ Henry II (Plantagenet), King ofEngland .

    ^ King HENRY II 12160 v England2 .

    ^ Henry ii "The_lawgiver" Plantagenet King .

    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • Press not a falling man too far!
    • Lord Chamberlain, scene ii
  • Farewell! a long farewell, to all my greatness!
    .This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth
    The tender leaves of hope; to-morrow blossoms,
    And bears his blushing honours thick upon him;
    The third day comes a frost, a killing frost,
    And, — when he thinks, good easy man, full surely
    His greatness is a-ripening, — nips his root,
    And then he falls, as I do.
    ^ This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth The tender leaves of hopes; to-morrow blossoms, And bears his blushing honours thick upon him; The third day comes a frost, a killing frost, And, when he thinks, good easy man, full surely His greatness is a-ripening, nips his root, And then he falls, as I do.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His overthrow heap'd happiness upon him; For then, and not till then, he felt himself, And found the blessedness of being little; And, to add greater honours to his age Than man could give him, he died fearing God.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let's in; And with some other business put the King From these sad thoughts, that work too much upon him.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I have ventur'd,
    Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders,
    This many summers in a sea of glory,
    But far beyond my depth: my high-blown pride
    At length broke under me; and now has left me,
    Weary and old with service, to the mercy
    Of a rude stream, that must forever hide me.
    ^ Hey Henry, I would like to thank Most of the Salvation Army staff and volunteers for making my community service there a good experience.

    ^ I know many taxpayers will not want to see the same good old boy's running for political office.

    ^ Hey Henry, my husband's birthday was today, and my little boy was so excited.


    .Vain pomp and glory of this world, I hate ye!^ Vain pomp and glory of this world, I hate ye!
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]


    .I feel my heart new open'd.^ I feel my heart new open'd.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am able now, methinks, Out of a fortitude of soul I feel, To endure more miseries and greater far Than my weak-hearted enemies dare offer.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My heart is broken and I hope you feel the same pain I feel.

    .O, how wretched
    Is that poor man that hangs on princes’ favours!
    ^ O, how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours!
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]


    .There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to,
    That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin,
    More pangs and fears than wars or women have;
    And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer,
    Never to hope again.
    ^ There is more traffic than ever there now.

    ^ In all the courts I have been a juror or observer in a court, the judge and all officials were more than courteous and never used inappropriate language.

    ^ Traffic would be a lot more fun if there were dancing bears and hula girls on either side of the road.

    .
    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • I feel within me
    A peace above all earthly dignities,
    A still and quiet conscience.^ I know myself now; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ O my Wolsey, The quiet of my wounded conscience, Thou art a cure fit for a King.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then, that you have sent innumerable substance— By what means got, I leave to your own conscience— To furnish Rome, and to prepare the ways You have for dignities; to the mere undoing Of all the kingdom.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • A load would sink a navy, — too much honour.^ The King has cur'd me, I humbly thank his Grace; and from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • And sleep in dull cold marble. .
    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • Say, Wolsey, — that once trod the ways of glory,
    And sounded all the depths and shoals of honour, —
    Found thee a way, out of his wreck, to rise in;
    A sure and safe one, though thy master miss'd it.^ Let's dry our eyes; and thus far hear me, Cromwell; And when I am forgotten, as I shall be, And sleep in dull cold marble, where no mention Of me more must be heard of, say, I taught thee; Say, Wolsey, that once trod the ways of glory, And sounded all the depths and shoals of honour, Found thee a way, out of his wreck, to rise in; A sure and safe one, though thy master miss'd it.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now his son, Henry the Eighth, life, honour, name, and all That made me happy, at one stroke has taken For ever from the world.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There's something more would out of thee; what say'st?
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • I charge thee, fling away ambition;
    By that sin fell the angels.^ Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition!
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ By that sin fell the angels; how can man, then, The image of his Maker, hope to win by it?
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee;
    Corruption wins not more than honesty.^ Cherish those hearts that hate thee; Corruption wins not more than honesty.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Love thyself last.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It took a little more effort than last time to steal this one to satisfy the Snoopy fetish you seem to have didn't it?


    .Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace,
    To silence envious tongues.
    ^ Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Be just, and fear not:
    Let all the ends thou aim’st at, be thy country’s,
    Thy God’s, and truth’s; then if thou fall’st, O Cromwell,
    Thou fall’st a blessed martyr!
    ^ Lets save Gods pride and joy, the planet earth, and all his people, and all his animals.

    ^ Let's all stop complaining about the awful traffic and the sorry political situation long enough to just enjoy the moment once in a while.

    ^ Let's all treat every living thing as though they were ourselves and maybe, just maybe we can have some empathy for all living beings.

    .
    • Wolsey, scene ii
  • Had I but serv'd my God with half the zeal
    I serv'd my king, he would not in mine age
    Have left me naked to mine enemies.^ Had I but serv'd my God with half the zeal I serv'd my king, He would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ SCENE II. Ante-chamber to the King's apartment.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So much fairer And spotless shall mine innocence arise, When the King knows my truth.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Wolsey, scene ii

Act IV

  • A royal train, believe me. .
    • 2 Gentleman, scene i
  • An old man, broken with the storms of state,
    Is come to lay his weary bones among ye;
    Give him a little earth for charity!
    • Griffith, quoting Wolsey, scene ii
  • He gave his honours to the world again,
    His blessed part to heaven, and slept in peace.^ At last, with easy roads, he came to Leicester, Lodg'd in the abbey; where the reverend abbot, With all his covent, honourably receiv'd him; To whom he gave these words: "O, father abbot, An old man, broken with the storms of state, Is come to lay his weary bones among ye; Give him a little earth for charity!"
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So went to bed, where eagerly his sickness Pursu'd him still; and, three nights after this, About the hour of eight, which he himself Foretold should be his last, full of repentance, Continual meditations, tears, and sorrows, He gave his honours to the world again, His blessed part to heaven, and slept in peace.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth The tender leaves of hopes; to-morrow blossoms, And bears his blushing honours thick upon him; The third day comes a frost, a killing frost, And, when he thinks, good easy man, full surely His greatness is a-ripening, nips his root, And then he falls, as I do.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Griffith, scene ii
  • So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!^ So may he rest; his faults lie gently on him!
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His faults lie open to the laws; let them, Not you, correct him.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Queen Katharine, scene ii
  • He was a man
    Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking
    Himself with princes.^ He was a man Of an unbounded stomach, ever ranking Himself with princes; one that, by suggestion, Tied all the kingdom.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Queen Katharine, scene ii
  • Men’s evil manners live in brass; their virtues
    We write in water.^ Noble madam, Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues We write in water.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Griffith, scene ii
  • He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one;
    Exceeding wise, fair-spoken, and persuading:
    Lofty and sour to them that lov'd him not;
    But to those men that sought him, sweet as summer,
    And though he were unsatisfied in getting,
    (Which was a sin) yet in bestowing, madam,
    He was most princely.^ He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one; Exceeding wise, fair-spoken, and persuading; Lofty and sour to them that lov'd him not, But to those men that sought him, sweet as summer.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And though he were unsatisfied in getting, Which was a sin, yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely: ever witness for him Those twins of learning that he rais'd in you, Ipswich and Oxford!
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I am most joyful, madam, such good dreams Possess your fancy.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Griffith, scene ii
  • After my death I wish no other herald,
    No other speaker of my living actions,
    To keep mine honour from corruption,
    But such an honest chronicler as Griffith.^ After my death I wish no other herald, No other speaker of my living actions, To keep mine honour from corruption, But such an honest chronicler as Griffith.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No sun shall ever usher forth mine honours, Or gild again the noble troops that waited Upon my smiles.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ That seal You ask with such a violence, the King, Mine and your master, with his own hand gave me, Bade me enjoy it, with the place and honours, During my life; and, to confirm his goodness, Tied it by letters-patents.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Queen Katharine, scene ii

Act V

.
  • To dance attendance on their lordships’ pleasures.^ I had thought They had parted so much honesty among 'em, At least, good manners, as not thus to suffer A man of his place, and so near our favour, To dance attendance on their lordships' pleasures, And at the door too, like a post with packets.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • King Henry, scene ii
  • 'T is a cruelty,
    To load a falling man.^ Henry II (Plantagenet), King ofEngland .

    ^ King HENRY II 12160 v England2 .

    ^ 'Tis a cruelty To load a falling man.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Cromwell, scene ii
  • You were ever good at sudden commendations,
    Bishop of Winchester. .But know, I come not
    To hear such flattery now; and in my presence,
    They are too thin and bare to hide offences.
    ^ But know, I come not To hear such flattery now, and in my presence; They are too thin and bare to hide offences.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let me speak, sir, For Heaven now bids me; and the words I utter Let none think flattery, for they'll find 'em truth.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I know at my sons school they will not assign lockers until all of the paperwork that parents are suppose to sign is turned back in to the teachers.

    .
    • King Henry, scene iii
  • Those about her
    From her shall read the perfect ways of honour.^ Henry III King of_England .

    ^ Henry III King of_England KING/ENGLAND .

    ^ Henry III (Plantagenet), King ofEngland .

    • Cranmer, scene iv
  • Wherever the bright sun of heaven shall shine,
    His honour and the greatness of his name
    Shall be, and make new nations. .
    • Cranmer, scene iv
  • A most unspotted lily shall she pass
    To the ground, and all the world shall mourn her.^ She must, the saints must have her; yet a virgin, A most unspotted lily shall she pass To the ground, and all the world shall mourn her.
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 10 February 2010 10:55 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]
    • The Life of King Henry the Eighth - Wikisource 2 February 2010 15:28 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Cranmer, scene iv

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