The Full Wiki

Hermann Tilke: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hermann Tilke (born December 31, 1954 in Olpe) is a German architect, designer of Formula One motor racing circuits and auto racer.

Contents

Racing

During the 1980s, Tilke competed in touring car racing, mainly on the old Nürburgring Nordschleife circuit. He also competed in VLN endurance racing and 24 Hours Nürburgring. He and Dirk Adorf won some VLN races with a V8Star Series in 2003 and 2004.

Architecture

Tilke established Tilke Engineering in 1984, combining skills in architecture, civil engineering and electronic engineering to provide complete solutions for motor racing and waste disposal projects.

One of his first, minor tasks was a short access road at the Nürburgring, earned due to contacts made by his racing efforts there. He later redesigned the first turn complex of the circuit in 2002.

His first major job was the dramatic change from the fast Österreichring to the much shorter A1-Ring in Austria, in the 1990s.

Having made numerous controversial changes to the established stable of F1 circuits, Tilke secured the contracts to design many high-profile new world circuits from scratch. These include:

Tilke was also involved in the radical overhauls of the Hockenheimring in Germany and most recently the Fuji Speedway in Japan. The alterations that were carried out to the Hockenheimring have generally not been well received by many fans of F1, who believe he has neutered a once great circuit. Tilke has also revealed plans for the reconstruction of Jacarepaguá in Rio, which will have staged the 2007 Pan American Games.

Tilke Engineering is also due to carry out work on Circuit de Catalunya, Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Nürburgring, Silverstone Circuit and La Ciudad del Motor de Aragon (Spain).

As of May 2007, Tilke is also currently working on the track for the Vodafone Bucharest Challenge 2007 The track will host the European FIA GT3 Championship, the GB Formula 3 and the Logan Cup race.

In February 2008, it was announced that Tilke would design the Russian circuit, Volokolamskring in time for a 2010 MotoGP race.

Tilke's trademark of circuit is a mixture long straight and tight hairpins, most at the beginning of his tracks, which is supposed to encourage overtaking.

Tilke's circuits have been criticized for producing uninteresting races[1] and he has been accused of "slowly killing" Formula One.[2]

External links

References


Simple English

Hermann Tilke (born December 31, 1954 in Olpe German) is an architect and designer of Formula One motor racing circuits. He is also an auto racer.

Contents

Racing

During the 1980s, Tilke competed in touring car racing. Most of his racing was on the old Nürburgring Nordschleife circuit. He also competed in VLN endurance racing and 24 Hours Nürburgring. He and Dirk Adorf won some VLN races with a V8Star Series in 2003 and 2004.

Architecture

Tilke established Tilke Engineering in 1984 to combine the skills in architecture, civil engineering and electronic engineering. Tilke Engineering provides complete solutions for motor racing and waste disposal projects.

His first large job was in Austria, in the 1990s. He made a major redesign of the fast Österreichring, and created the much shorter A1-Ring.

Tilke made changes to many established F1 circuits. Because of this, Tilke was able to earn the contracts to design many of new new, high-profile circuits from scratch.

Tilke's trademark of circuit design is a mixture long straight and tight hairpins. These are intended to encourage overtaking.

Criticism

Tilke's circuits have been criticized for producing uninteresting races.[1] He has been accused of "slowly killing" Formula One.[2]

List of Circuits

Tilke has design many high-profile new world circuits from scratch. These include:

References

Other websites








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message