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Hermes
Hermes Logios Altemps 33.jpg
Messenger of the gods, god of commerce, thieves, travelers, sports, and border crossings
Abode Mount Olympus
Symbol Caduceus, winged sandals, tortoise
Parents Zeus and Maia
Children Eros, Pan, Hermaphroditus, Tyche, Abderus, Autolycus
Roman equivalent Mercury
.Hermes (pronounced /ˈhɜrmiːz/; Greek Ἑρμῆς) is the great messenger of the gods in Greek mythology and additionally as a guide to the Underworld.^ Hermes was the patron god of heralds and messengers.

^ The symbol in the title is the alchemical symbol for mercury, the sign of Mercury (Hermes), fleet messenger of the gods.
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^ I am sorry Of great Hermes I begin to sing, Cunning messenger of the deathless ones, He who guides me with winged feet, He who amuses and captivates me, Splendid god of commerce, may you hear me and be present, Aid me in life and guide me in death, Thankyou, I end this hymn in awe.
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.An Olympian god, he is also the patron of boundaries and of the travelers who travel across them, of shepherds and cowherds, of the cunning of thieves and liars, of orators and wit, of literature and poets, of athletics and sports, of weights and measures, of invention, and of commerce in general.^ He was god of the flocks and patron of the shepherds.

^ Mercury is the god of commerce, travel and thieves.
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^ Olympians referred to the gods who resided in Olympus.

[1] .His symbols include the tortoise, the rooster, the winged sandals, the winged hat, and the caduceus (given to him by Apollo in exchange for the lyre).^ Apollo liked the music coming from the instrument so much, that he decided to give Hermes his cattle and his shepherd staff in exchanged for the lyre.

^ Before the end of his first day after his birth, he had invented the lyre made of a tortoise's shell, and he had also stolen Apollo's cattle from the mountains of Pieria.

^ Hermes gave him the lyre that he invented, making the instrument with a tortoise shell and sheep guts for strings.

In the Roman adaptation of the Greek religion. .(see interpretatio romana), Hermes was identified with the Roman god Mercury, who, though inherited from the Etruscans, developed many similar characteristics, such as being the patron of commerce.^ He was identified as the Roman god, Mercury .

^ Mercury is the god of commerce, travel and thieves.
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^ Hermes was the patron god of heralds and messengers.

The Homeric hymn to Hermes invokes him as the one "of many shifts (polytropos), blandly cunning, a robber, a cattle driver, a bringer of dreams, a watcher by night, a thief at the gates, one who was soon to show forth wonderful deeds among the deathless gods."[2]
.He protects and takes care of all the travelers, miscreants, harlots, old crones and thieves that pray to him or cross his path.^ After crossing these barriers, methylmercury is converted back into the highly destructive ionic form and destroys all cell components in its path.
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He is athletic and is always looking out for runners, or any athletes with injuries who need his help. .Hermes is a messenger from the gods to humans, sharing this role with Iris.^ Hermes was the patron god of heralds and messengers.

^ The symbol in the title is the alchemical symbol for mercury, the sign of Mercury (Hermes), fleet messenger of the gods.
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^ Hermes had many skills and attributes, but his primary duty was to act as a messenger or herald for the gods.

.An interpreter who bridges the boundaries with strangers is a hermeneus. Hermes gives us our word "hermeneutics" for the art of interpreting hidden meaning.^ This gives us the absolute temperature T, now measured in kelvin, K. Experiments are difficult, but thermometer scales have be calibrated absolutely by this and other means.
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^ Winged God, who guide us all on journeys of our lives.
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In Greek a lucky find was a hermaion. Hermes delivered messages from Olympus to the mortal world. .He wears shoes with wings on them and uses them to fly freely between the mortal and immortal world.^ The main difference between Hermes and Iris (apart from their genders), was that Iris didn't need sandals to fly, because she had wings.

.Hermes was the second youngest of the Olympian gods, being born before Dionysus.^ Dionysus was a god, who was born twice.

^ Like the other younger Olympian gods, Hermes had many children from many mistresses.

^ According to the myth about Dionysus, Hestia was an Olympian, but she stepped down in favour of Dionysus, when the young god came to live in Olympus.

Hermes, as an inventor of fire,[3] is a parallel of the Titan, Prometheus. In addition to the lyre, Hermes was believed to have invented many types of racing and the sports of wrestling and boxing, and therefore was a patron of athletes.[4]
According to prominent folklorist Yeleazar Meletinsky, Hermes is a deified trickster.[5] Hermes also served as a psychopomp, or an escort for the dead to help them find their way to the afterlife (the Underworld in the Greek myths). .In many Greek myths, Hermes was depicted as the only god besides Hades, Persephone, Hecate, and Thanatos who could enter and leave the Underworld without hindrance.^ Euphemus was a great runner, who could run on top of the waves, without getting his feet wet.

^ When the soul departed, only those who had lived a righteous life could enjoy their final resting place in Elysium as their reward.

^ Like the other younger Olympian gods, Hermes had many children from many mistresses.

.Hermes often helped travelers have a safe and easy journey.^ Hermes often helped and guided humans in their activities.

Many Greeks would sacrifice to Hermes before any trip.
.In the fully-developed Olympian pantheon, Hermes was the son of Zeus and the Pleiade Maia, a daughter of the Titan Atlas.^ Hermes was son of Zeus and Maia (a Pleiad, see the Pleiades ), a daughter of Atlas and Pleïone (Pleione).

^ The Pleiad, named Maia , bored him a son called Hermes .

^ Zeus was father of Hermes, by the Pleiad Maia .

.Hermes' symbols were the cock and the tortoise, and he can be recognized by his purse or pouch, winged sandals, winged cap, and the herald's staff, the kerykeion.^ Hermes can also be recognised by his winged helmet, called a Petasus , and more importantly a pair of winged sandals, called Talaria .

^ The main difference between Hermes and Iris (apart from their genders), was that Iris didn't need sandals to fly, because she had wings.

^ Hermes had the badges of his office as a herald, especially the herald staff, known as Caduceus .

.The night he was born he slipped away from Maia and stole his elder brother Apollo's cattle.^ That night, Apollo discovered the missing cows among his cattle, so he followed the tracks.

^ Apollo told him there were only eleven gods, but Hermes told his elder half-brother that he himself was to be the twelfth Olympian.

Contents

Epithets of Hermes

Kriophoros

Hermes Kriophoros, Hermes, lamb-bearer appears early and later. .His ram connection appears in the earliest Mycenaean Linear B inscription bearing his name.^ Poseidon also has a feminine name in the Linear B tablets, PO-SI-DA-E-JA. The centre of his worship appeared to be at Pylos, during the Bronze Age.

^ Clearly, Poseidon was an important god during pre-Hellenic Mycenaean civilisation since his name, PO-SE-DA-O-NE, appeared frequently in the Linear B tablets.

.And Pausanias reports the lamb-carrying rites still being performed at the Boeotian city of Tanagra in the late second century of the Common Era.^ Retrofire was reported to have initiated 2 seconds late during the Mercury-Atlas 8 (MA-8) mission.

Argeiphontes

.Hermes' epithet Argeiphontes (Latin Argicida), or Argus-slayer, recalls his slaying of the hundred eyed giant Argus Panoptes, who was watching over the heifer-nymph Io in the sanctuary of Queen Hera herself in Argos.^ He killed Argus Panoptes , who was guarding the Argive heroine Io , while in the form of a heifer.

^ Hermes had a number of epithets: Argiphontes (slayer of Argus Panoptes), Cylleneius, Epimelios (guardian of flocks), Hodios (patron of traveller and wayfarers), Nomios, Oneiropompus (conductor of dreams), Psychopompus (conductor of souls to the Underworld).

Putting Argus to sleep, Hermes used a spell to close all of Argus' eyes and then slew the giant. .Argus' eyes were then put into the tail of the peacock, symbol of the goddess Hera.^ Side had boasted that her beauty surpassed Hera, so the goddess threw the foolish woman into Hades.

Logios

His epithet of Logios is the representation of the god in the act of speaking, as orator, or as the god of eloquence. Indeed, together with Athena, he was the standard divine representation of eloquence in classical Greece. The Homeric Hymn to Hermes (probably 6th century BCE) describes Hermes making a successful speech from the cradle to defend himself from the (true) charge of cattle theft. Somewhat later, Proclus' commentary on Plato's Republic describes Hermes as the god of persuasion. Yet later, Neoplatonists viewed Hermes Logios more mystically as origin of a "Hermaic chain" of light and radiance emanating from the divine intellect (nous). This epithet also produced a sculptural type.
The cap badge of the British Royal Signal Corps bears a representation of Giambologna's Mercury

Other

Other epithets included:
  • Diaktoros, the messenger
  • Dolios, the schemer
  • Enagonios, lord of contests
  • Enodios, on the road
  • Epimelius, keeper of flocks
  • Eriounios, luck bringer
  • Polygius
  • Psychopompos, conveyor of souls
  • Trismegistus later in Hermeticism

Cult

Mercury by Hendrick Goltzius, 1611 (Frans Halsmuseum, Haarlem)
General article: Cult (religion).
.Though temples to Hermes existed throughout Greece, a major center of his cult was at Pheneos in Arcadia, where festivals in his honor were called Hermoea.^ There were many Dionysian cults and festivals established throughout the Greek world, as well as in Rome.

.As a crosser of boundaries, Hermes Psychopompos' ("conductor of the soul") was a psychopomp, meaning he brought newly-dead souls to the Underworld and Hades.^ Hermes had a number of epithets: Argiphontes (slayer of Argus Panoptes), Cylleneius, Epimelios (guardian of flocks), Hodios (patron of traveller and wayfarers), Nomios, Oneiropompus (conductor of dreams), Psychopompus (conductor of souls to the Underworld).

^ The shades of the dead followed Hermes' Caduceus through the passages of Hades.

^ Hermes also had the strange duty of guiding departed souls to the Underworld.

.In the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Hermes conducted Persephone the Kore (young girl or virgin), safely back to Demeter.^ Plutus was one of the triad of deities worshipped in the Eleusinian Mystery of Demeter and Kore (Persephone).

He also brought dreams to living mortals.
.Among the Hellenes, as the related word herma ("a boundary stone, crossing point") would suggest, Hermes embodied the spirit of crossing-over: He was seen to be manifest in any kind of interchange, transfer, transgressions, transcendence, transition, transit or traversal, all of which involve some form of crossing in some sense.^ Principal Art Bridges at one point said any student involved "will get a stern talking-to" but would not be suspended.
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^ After crossing these barriers, methylmercury is converted back into the highly destructive ionic form and destroys all cell components in its path.
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^ However, they noted, the substantial DHA concentrations measured in some subpopulations of the participants would suggest their mercury likely derived from consumption of marine fish.
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.This explains his connection with transitions in one’s fortune—with the interchanges of goods, words and information involved in trade, interpretation, oration, writing—with the way in which the wind may transfer objects from one place to another, and with the transition to the afterlife.^ Hephaestus may have had another son, named Palaemon of Aetolia, who was one of the Argonauts.

^ Mercury vapors from gold mining are causing brain damage in the children of Nambija, an Indian word that means "the place that no one can find."
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^ If you do not like this image or would prefer another one, and if you are not familiar with how, please contact me, and I will explain.
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.Many graffito dedications to Hermes have been found in the Athenian Agora, in keeping with his epithet of Agoraios and his role as patron of commerce.^ Hermes was god of commerce and the market, which made him the patron of merchants, but at the same time, he was also the patron of thieves and rogues.

[6]
.Originally, Hermes was depicted as an older, bearded, phallic god, but in the late 4th century BCE, the traditional Hermes was reimagined as an athletic youth (illustration, top right).^ With Apollo, Hermes was the god of athletic contests and patron of athletes.

Statues of the new type of Hermes stood at stadia and gymnasia throughout Greece.

Hermai/Herms

Lee Lawrie, Hermes (1939). Library of Congress John Adams Building, Washington, D.C.
In Ancient Greece, Hermes was a phallic god of boundaries. His name, in the form herma, was applied to a wayside marker pile of stones; each traveller added a stone to the pile. In the 6th century BCE, Hipparchos, the son of Pisistratus, replaced the cairns that marked the midway point between each village deme at the central agora of Athens with a square or rectangular pillar of stone or bronze topped by a bust of Hermes with a beard. An erect phallus rose from the base. In the more primitive Mount Kyllini or Cyllenian herms, the standing stone or wooden pillar was simply a carved phallus. .In Athens, herms were placed outside houses for good luck.^ She told the researcher that "elemental mercury could be sprinkled for good luck or could be placed in a water goblet [with water and camphor]."
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."That a monument of this kind could be transformed into an Olympian god is astounding," Walter Burkert remarked (Burkert 1985).^ Dionysus was the only one of the twelve Olympians to be born from a mortal woman, Semele , daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia (though she was later transformed into a goddess in the Dionysus myth).

^ His sacred animals were fish, dolphin and goat, because he had been transformed into a kid, to hide the young god from Hera.

.In 415 BCE, when the Athenian fleet was about to set sail for Syracuse during the Peloponnesian War, all of the Athenian hermai were vandalized one night.^ Wilma Cozart Fine with porta phone communicating during one of the recording sessions of The Civil War.
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The Athenians at the time believed it was the work of saboteurs, either from Syracuse or from the anti-war faction within Athens itself. Socrates' pupil Alcibiades was suspected of involvement, and Socrates indirectly paid for the impiety with his life.
From these origins, hermai moved into the repertory of Classical architecture.

Hermes' iconography

.Hermes was usually portrayed wearing a broad-brimmed dush's hat or a winged cap (petasus), wearing winged sandals (talaria), and carrying his Near Eastern herald's staff – either a caduceus entwined by serpents, or a kerykeion topped with a symbol similar to the astrological symbol of Taurus the bull.^ Hermes had the badges of his office as a herald, especially the herald staff, known as Caduceus .

^ Hermes can also be recognised by his winged helmet, called a Petasus , and more importantly a pair of winged sandals, called Talaria .

^ The snakes attached themselves to the staff and became permanently entwined around the Caduceus .

Hermes wore the garments of a traveler, worker, or shepherd. He was represented by purses or bags, cocks (illustration, left), and tortoises. When depicted as Hermes Logios, he was the divine symbol of eloquence, generally shown speaking with one arm raised for emphasis.

Birth

.Hermes was born on Mount Kellina|Mount Cyllene in Arcadia.^ Hermes was born in a cave within the forest near the mountain of Cyllene.

.According to the Homeric Hymn to Hermes, Zeus in the dead of night secretly begot Hermes upon Maia Maia, a nymph.^ Zeus was father of Hermes, by the Pleiad Maia .

^ According to Homer, Aphrodite was known as the daughter of Zeus and Dione .

^ Hermes was son of Zeus and Maia (a Pleiad, see the Pleiades ), a daughter of Atlas and Pleïone (Pleione).

The Greeks have more generally applied the name to a midwife or a wise and gentle old woman. The nymph appears to have been an ancient one, or more probably a goddess. .At any rate, she was one of the Pleiades, daughters of Atlas, taking refuge in a cave of Mount Cyllene in Arcadia.^ Hermes was son of Zeus and Maia (a Pleiad, see the Pleiades ), a daughter of Atlas and Pleïone (Pleione).

.They were discovered by the local king, Abacus (Greek mythology)|Abacus, who raised Hermes as his foster son.^ Hermes had two other sons, Echion and Erytus, who sailed with Jason and the Argonauts.

The infant Hermes was precocious. .His first day he invented the lyre.^ Before the end of his first day after his birth, he had invented the lyre made of a tortoise's shell, and he had also stolen Apollo's cattle from the mountains of Pieria.

By nightfall, he had rustled the immortal cattle of Apollo. .For the first sacrifice, the taboos surrounding the sacred kine of Apollo had to be transgressed, and the trickster god of boundaries was the one to do it.^ No one, god or mortal, could play the lyre better than Apollo could.

^ Though, in earlier accounts, Paeëon (Paeeon) may have been a god of healing; but the name may also have been one of Apollo's epithets.

^ Of all the gods in Olympus, only one other god demand human sacrifice – Ares .

.Hermes drove the cattle back to Greece and hid them, and covered their tracks.^ Hermes then cleverly hid the other cattle in Pylos.

.When Apollo accused Hermes, Maia said that it could not be him because he was with her the whole night.^ Hermes was ever resourceful and knew that someone would pursue him, possibly even Apollo himself.

^ On the same day, Hermes raped Chione during the day, while Apollo ravished her at night.

^ Because the study measured exposures by age, sex and ethnic background, it could help public health officials focus their priorities, officials and experts said.
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.However, Zeus entered the argument and said that Hermes did steal the cattle and they should be returned.^ WND calls to the commissary were not returned, and officials with the U.S. Air Force Reserve said they couldn't comment.
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^ ''If antivaccinationists did not have mercury, they would have another issue,'' he said at one meeting.
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^ We agreed and sad said each legislator should have a copy of all of the proof and contents of this CD so they can make informed decisions when it is time to vote.
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.While arguing with Apollo, Hermes began to play his lyre.^ As Apollo was deciding on Hermes' punishment, he heard Hermes play the lyre.

^ No one, god or mortal, could play the lyre better than Apollo could.

^ Apollo liked the music coming from the instrument so much, that he decided to give Hermes his cattle and his shepherd staff in exchanged for the lyre.

.The instrument enchanted Apollo and he agreed to let Hermes keep the cattle in exchange for the lyre.^ Hermes answered with crafty words that he doesn't know what Apollo was talking about, like "what is this cattle?"

^ Apollo liked the music coming from the instrument so much, that he decided to give Hermes his cattle and his shepherd staff in exchanged for the lyre.

^ Before the end of his first day after his birth, he had invented the lyre made of a tortoise's shell, and he had also stolen Apollo's cattle from the mountains of Pieria.

Hermes' offspring

Pan

.The satyr-like Greek god of nature, shepherds and flocks, Pan was often said to be the son of Hermes through the nymph Dryope.^ He was god of the flocks and patron of the shepherds.

^ However many of the nymphs were unsuccessful in remaining virgin, like their goddess, because the gods often amorously pursue these unwilling nymphs.

^ She bore twins, a son to each god: Autolycus (thief) to Hermes and Philammon (bard) to Apollo.

In the Homeric Hymn to Pan, Pan's mother ran away from the newborn god in fright from his goat-like appearance.

Hermaphroditus

.Hermaphroditus was an immortal son of Hermes through Aphrodite.^ Obviously, Hermaphroditus was named after his parents, Hermes and Aphrodite.

^ So Aphrodite surrendered to Hermes' lust and became mother of a son, named Hermaphroditus .

.He was changed into an androgynous being when the gods literally granted the nymph Salmacis' wish that they never separate.^ She changed into a mare to hide from the sea-god, but Poseidon changed himself into a stallion and mounted her.

^ The pirates were changed into dolphins once they were in the water.

^ We do not know if these living organisms will mutate or what they might change into in the future.
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Priapus

.The god Priapus was a son of Hermes and Aphrodite.^ She bore twins, a son to each god: Autolycus (thief) to Hermes and Philammon (bard) to Apollo.

^ Dionysus had an affair with Aphrodite , who gave him a son named Priapus , god of fertility.

^ According to the Fasti , the Roman poet Ovid wrote that Priapus , son of Dionysus and Aphrodite, had almost raped Hestia, when she and the other gods had fallen into a slumber after a feast.

In Priapus, Hermes' phallic origins survived. According to other sources, Priapus was a son of Dionysus and Aphrodite

Eros

.According to some sources, the mischievous winged god of love Eros, son of Aphrodite, was sired by Hermes, though the gods Ares and Hephaestus were also among those said to be the sire, whereas in the Theogeny, Hesiod claims that Eros was born of nothing before the Gods.^ One said that Hephaestus was born lame.

^ Through Aphrodite, Ares was the father of Anteros (Passion), Eros , Deimus (Fear), Phobus (Panic), and a daughter named Harmonia , wife of Cadmus of Thebes .

^ Ares was the brother of Hebe , Eileithyia and possibly of Hephaestus , though most writers say that Hephaestus was son of Hera, alone.

.Eros' Roman name was Cupid.^ In the Roman tale, as Venus , Aphrodite wanted to make Psyche married a monster, but her own son, Cupid (Eros) fell in love with her.

.Eros also has magical arrows, with them, he can cause any mortal to fall in love with the next being they see, human or otherwise.^ But Eros shot Daphne with a leaden arrow-point, which would cause Daphne to reject any love.

^ Angry at the reproach, Eros used one of his gold-tipped arrows and made Apollo fall in love with a nymph named Daphne , daughter of the river-god Peneius.

^ Aphrodite caused his stepmother, Phaedra , daughter of King Minos, to fall in love with him.

Tyche

The goddess of prosperity, Tyche (Greek Τύχη), or Fortuna, was sometimes said to be the daughter of Hermes and Aphrodite

Abderus

Abderus was devoured by the Mares of Diomedes. He had gone to the Mares with his friend Heracles.

Autolycus

.Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, was a son of Hermes and grandfather of Odysseus.^ Autolycus was the father of Anticleia and grandfather of Odysseus .

^ She bore twins, a son to each god: Autolycus (thief) to Hermes and Philammon (bard) to Apollo.

List of Hermes' consorts and children

Hermes with petasus, talaria and caduceus: Mercury fastening his sandals, by François Rude, (Musée du Louvre)
  1. Aglaurus Athenian priestess
    1. Eumolpus warlord
  2. Artemis Goddess of the Hunt (according to some legends)
  3. Amphion King of Thebes in Boiotia
  4. Antheus
  5. Antianeira Malian princess
    1. Echion Argonaut
  6. Apemosyne Cretan princess
  7. Aphrodite
    1. Epoties King of Troy and died in Athena arms when the war was over.
    2. Hermaphroditus
    3. Peitho
    4. Priapus (in some traditions)
    5. Rhodos
    6. Tyche
  8. Carmentis Arcadian nymph
    1. Evander founder of Latium
  9. Chione Phocian princess
    1. Autolycus thief
  10. Chryses priest of Apollo
  11. Crocus who died and became the crocus flower
  12. Dryope Arcadian nymph
    1. Pan rustic god
  13. Eupolomia Phthian princess
    1. Aethalides Argonaut herald
  14. Herse Athenian priestess
    1. Cephalus hunter
    2. (Also Ceryx)
  15. Pandrosus Athenian priestess
    1. Ceryx Eleusinian herald
  16. Peitho ("Persuasion" his wife according to Nonnos)
  17. Penelope Arcadian nymph (or wife of Odysseus)
    1. Pan (according to one tradition)
  18. Persephone (according to one tradition)
  19. Perseus
  20. Polymele (daughter of Phylas according to Iliad)
    1. Eudorus (myrmidon; soldier in Trojan War)
  21. Sicilian nymph
    1. Daphnis rustic poet
  22. Theobula Eleian prince
    1. Myrtilus charioteer
  23. Therses
  1. Born of the urine of Hermes, Poseidon and Zeus
    1. Orion giant hunter (in one tradition)
  2. Unknown mothers
    1. Abderus squire of Heracles

Hermes in myth

The Iliad

.In Homer's Iliad, Hermes helps King Priam of Troy (Ilium) sneak into the Achaean (Greek) encampment to confront Achilles and convince him to return Hector's body.^ With the help of the mortal Aeacus , king of Aegina, they built the wall of Troy.

.The body of Sarpedon is carried away from the battlefield of Troy by the twin winged gods, Hypnos (Sleep) and Thanatos (Death).^ In a form of a bull, he carried Europa away to the island of Crete, where he became father of Minos, Rhadamanthys (Rhadamanthus) and Sarpedon.

The pair are depicted clothed in armour, and are overseen by Hermes Psychopompos (Guide of the Dead). The scene appears in book 16 of Homer's Iliad:
."[Apollon] gave him [the dead Sarpedon] into the charge of swift messengers to carry him, of Hypnos (Sleep) and Thanatos (Death), who are twin brothers, and these two presently laid him down within the rich countryside of broad Lykia."^ They want to poison all who would willingly accept without question these toxins into their bodies.
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^ Crossing swift rivers and hiking uphill to Nambija, 6,000 feet into the mountains, is routine for him.
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^ Dionysus had an affair with Aphrodite , who gave him a son named Priapus , god of fertility.

[7]

The Odyssey

In book 5, Hermes is sent to demand from Calypso Odysseus's release from the island of Ogygia; in book 10, he protects Odysseus from Circe by bestowing upon him a herb, moly, which protects him from her soporific spell. .Hermes also appears in book 24, where he plays the role of psychopomp and leads the freshly slain suitors and disloyal maids to the underworld.^ Maternal hypothyroidism appears to play a role in at least 15% of children whose IQs are more than 1 standard deviation below the mean, millions of children.
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Odysseus, the main character of the Odyssey, is of matrilineal descent from Hermes.[5]

Perseus

Hermes aided Perseus in killing the gorgon (Medusa) by giving Perseus his winged sandals and telling him to find the Gray Sisters (the Graeae) so they could direct him to the nymphs of the North. When he reached the nymphs they would give him Zeus' sword, Hades' helmet, and Athena's shield.

Prometheus

In the ancient play Prometheus Bound, attributed to Aeschylus, Zeus sends Hermes to confront the enchained Titan Prometheus about a prophecy of the Titan's that Zeus would be overthrown. Hermes scolds Prometheus for being unreasonable and willing to endure torture, but Prometheus refuses to give him details about the prophecy.

Herse/Aglaurus/Pandrosus

.When Hermes loved Herse, one of three sisters who served Athena as priestesses or parthenos, her jealous older sister Aglaurus stood between them.^ One document, for example, records comments made by Robert Brent, a Philadelphia pediatrician who served as a consultant for the thimerosal study.
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^ According to Euripides, Iphigeneia served as high priestess of Artemis' Tauric temple, where she had to perform human sacrifice of strangers who set foot on their land.

^ From this union, Hermes was the father of Autolycus , who followed one of his father's occupations as a thief.

Hermes changed Aglaurus to stone. Hermes then impregnated Aglaurus while she was stone. Cephalus was the son of Hermes and Herse. .Hermes had another son, Ceryx, who was said to be the offspring of either Herse or Herse's other sister, Pandrosus.^ Hephaestus was sometimes said to be the son of Zeus and Hera, while others argued that Hephaestus had no father.

^ Some say that Hera threw her son out of Olympus, while others say that it was Zeus who threw Hephaestus out of heaven, when Hephaestus tried to protect Hera from Zeus' attack.

^ Hephaestus may have had another son, named Palaemon of Aetolia, who was one of the Argonauts.

With Aglaurus, Hermes was the father of Eumolpus.

Other stories

.In the story of the musician Orpheus, Hermes brought Eurydice back to Hades after Orpheus failed to bring her back to life when he looked back toward her after Hades told him not to.^ The Faerie Queene Gracious Hermes, guide and teacher, bring my child's lost treasure back to her on the same tide that took it out.
  • Temple of Hermes's Dreambook 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC books.dreambook.com [Source type: General]

^ Apollo told him there were only eleven gods, but Hermes told his elder half-brother that he himself was to be the twelfth Olympian.

.Hermes helped to protect the infant god Dionysus from Hera, after Hera destroyed Dionysus' mortal mother Semele through her jealousy that Semele had conceived an immortal son of Zeus.^ Ares was a son of Zeus and Hera, and was known as the Roman god, Mars .

^ According to Hesiod, Zeus made Ariadne immortal for the sake of his son.

^ Hephaestus was sometimes said to be the son of Zeus and Hera, while others argued that Hephaestus had no father.

.Hermes changed the Minyades into bats.^ To hide Dionysus, Zeus changed him into a kid (goat) and Hermes left him in the care of Nysa, a nymph.

.Hermes learned from the Thriae the arts of fortune-telling and divination.^ Apollo even taught Hermes the art of divining using pebbles.

When the gods created Pandora, it was Hermes who brought her to mortals and bestowed upon her a strong sense of curiosity.
.King Atreus of Mycenae retook the throne from his brother Thyestes using advice he received from the trickster Hermes.^ Atreus retook the throne and banished Thyestes.
  • Pagan News - Pagan News & Information 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.pagannews.com [Source type: General]

^ King Atreus of Mycenae retook the throne from his brother, Thyestes using advice he received from the wise trickster Hermes.
  • Pagan News - Pagan News & Information 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.pagannews.com [Source type: General]

Thyestes agreed to give the kingdom back when the sun moved backwards in the sky, a feat that Zeus accomplished. Atreus retook the throne and banished Thyestes.
.Diogenes, speaking in jest, related the myth of Hermes taking pity on his son Pan, who was pining for Echo but unable to get a hold of her, and teaching him the trick of masturbation to relieve his suffering.^ Dionysus had an affair with Aphrodite , who gave him a son named Priapus , god of fertility.

^ The Pleiad, named Maia , bored him a son called Hermes .

^ Hermes had two other sons, Echion and Erytus, who sailed with Jason and the Argonauts.

Pan later taught the habit to shepherds.[8]
.Battus, a shepherd from Pylos, witnessed Hermes stealing Apollo's cattle.^ While Hermes was stealing Apollos cattle, a shepherd named Battus witnessed it.
  • Pagan News - Pagan News & Information 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.pagannews.com [Source type: General]

^ Apollo complained to Maia that her son had stolen his cattle, but Hermes had already replaced himself in the blankets she had wrapped him in, so Maia refused to believe Apollos claim.
  • Pagan News - Pagan News & Information 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.pagannews.com [Source type: General]

^ Hermes answered with crafty words that he doesn't know what Apollo was talking about, like "what is this cattle?"

Though he promised his silence, he told many others. Hermes turned him to stone.

Hermes in classical art

.In the course of the fifth century, the traditional bearded image of Hermes was replaced by a younger, beardless god.^ Like the other younger Olympian gods, Hermes had many children from many mistresses.

.The most famous depiction of Hermes in classical art is perhaps the Hermes and Dionysus group by Praxiteles, son of Kephisodotos, which is dated to about 360–350 BC. The group shows Hermes playing with the baby Dionysus, and although we have lost the hand that held the baby's interest, it is probable that it held a bunch of grapes (a nod to the fact that Dionysus became the god of wine).^ She says of her son, "At about 18-20 months of age he started to show signs of withdrawl from his dad, sisters, and myself.
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^ The third Dionysus is the commonly known wine god with the name Bacchus, who was the son of Zeus and Semele , a Theban princess and daughter of Cadmus.

^ Mars became the second most important god in the Roman pantheon, after his father Jupiter (Zeus).

Notes

  1. ^ Walter Burkert, Greek Religion 1985 section III.2.8; "Hermes." Encyclopedia Mythica from Encyclopedia Mythica Online. Retrieved October 04, 2006.
  2. ^ Hymn to Hermes 13. The word polutropos ("of many shifts, turning many ways, of many devices, ingenious, or much wandering") is also used to describe Odysseus in the first line of the Odyssey.
  3. ^ In the Homeric hymn, "after he had fed the loud-bellowing cattle... he gathered much wood and sought the craft of fire. He also invented written music and many other things. He took a splendid laurel branch, gripped it in his palm, and twirled it in pomegranate wood" (lines 105, 108–10)
  4. ^ "First Inventors... Mercurius [Hermes] first taught wrestling to mortals." – Hyginus (c.1st CE), Fabulae 277.
  5. ^ a b Meletinsky, Introduzione (1993), p. 131
  6. ^ a b Mabel Lang (1988) (PDF). Graffiti in the Athenian Agora. Excavations of the Athenian Agora (rev. ed.). Princeton, NJ: American School of Classical Studies at Athens. p. 7. ISBN 87661-633-3. http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/publications/upload/Graffiti%20in%20the%20Athenian%20AgoraLR.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-14. 
  7. ^ Homer, Iliad 16.681
  8. ^ Dio Chrysostom, Discourses, vi.20

References

.
  • Walter Burkert, 1985. Greek Religion (Harvard University Press)
  • Kerenyi, Karl, 1944. Hermes der Seelenführer.
  • Ventris, Michael and Chadwick, John (1956).^ Michael Shannon, a Harvard Medical School pediatrician, and Leo Buchanan of Harvard University Health Services have volunteered to treat the children as they have those in Ecuador.
    • Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC vaccinetruth.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Documents in Mycenaean Greek. Second edition (1974). (Cambridge UP) ISBN 0-521-08558-6.
  • Meletinskii, Eleazar M. 1986, Vvedenie v istoričeskuû poétiku éposa i romana. Moscow, Nauka.(Russian)
    • Introduzione alla poetica storica dell'epos e del romanzo (1993) (Italian)

External links


Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010
(Redirected to 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Hermes article)

From Wikisource

1911 Encyclopædia Britannica
Hermes
See also Hermes on Wikipedia, and our 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica disclaimer.

HERMES, a Greek god, identified by the Romans with Mercury. The derivation of his name and his primitive character are very uncertain. The earliest centres of his cult were Arcadia, where Mt. Cyllene was reputed to be his birthplace, the islands of Lemnos, Imbros and Samothrace, in which he was associated with the Cabeiri and Attica. In Arcadia he was specially worshipped as the god of fertility, and his images were ithyphallic, as also were the "Hermee" at Athens. Herodotus (ii. 51) states that the Athenians borrowed this type from the Pelasgians, thus testifying to the great antiquity of the phallic Hermes.

At Cyllene in Elis a mere phallus served as his emblem, and was highly venerated in the time of Pausanias (vi. 26.3). Both in literature and cult Hermes was constantly associated with the protection of cattle and sheep; at Tanagra and elsewhere his title was Kpcoc60pos, the ram-bearer. As a pastoral god he was often closely connected with deities of vegetation, especially Pan and the nymphs. His pastoral character is recognized in the 1 Note the prestige of martyrs and confessors, the ways of true and false prophets in Mand. xi., and the different t y pes of evil and good "walk" among Christians, e.g. in Vis. iii. 5-7; Mand. viii.; Sim. viii.

Iliad (xiv. 490) and the later epic hymn to Hermes; and his Homeric titles aKaK1 7 Ta, ipcobvcos, &.'rwp Eawv, probably refer to him as the giver of fertility. In the Odyssey, however, he appears mainly as the messenger of the gods, and the conductor of the dead to Hades. Hence in later times he is often represented in art and mythology as a herald. The conductor of souls was naturally a chthonian god; at Athens there was a festival. in honour of Hermes and the souls of the dead, and Aeschylus (Persae, 628) invokes Hermes, with Earth and Hades, in summoning a spirit from the underworld.

The function of a messengergod may have originated the conception of Hermes as a dreamgod; he is called the "conductor of dreams" (17 1 y7 7 7wp ovcipwv), and the Greeks offered to him the last libation before sleep. As a messenger he may also have become the god of roads and doorways; he was the protector of travellers and his images were used for boundary-marks (see Hermae). It was a custom to make a cairn of stones near the wayside statues of Hermes, each passer-by adding a stone; the significance of the practice, which is found in many countries, is discussed by Frazer (Golden Bough, 2nd ed., iii. Io f.) and Hartland (Legend of Perseus, ii. 228). Treasure found in the road ('p,uacov) was the gift of Hermes, and any stroke of good luck was attributed to him; but it may be doubted whether his patronage of luck in general was developed from his function as a god of roads. As the giver of luck he became a deity of gain and commerce (KEpS ios, 6.yopa70s), an aspect which caused his identification with Mercury, the Roman god of trade.

From this conception his thievish character may have been evolved. The trickery and cunning of Hermes is a Prominent theme in literature from Homer downwards, although it is very rarely recognized in official cult. 2 In the hymn to Hermes the god figures as a precocious child (a type familiar in folk-lore), who when a new-born babe steals the cows of Apollo. In addition to these characteristics various other functions were assigned to Hermes, who developed, perhaps, into the most complete type of the versatile Greek. In many respects he was a counterpart of Apollo, less dignified and powerful, but more human than his greater brother.

Hermes was a patron of music, like Apollo, and invented the cithara; he presided over the games, with Apollo and Heracles, and his statues were common in the stadia and gymnasia. He became, in fact, the ideal Greek youth, equally proficient in the "musical" and "gymnastic" branches of Greek education. On the "musical" side he was the special patron of eloquence (Mycos); in gymnastic, he was the giver of grace rather than of strength, which was the province of Heracles. Though athletic, he was one of the least militant of the gods; a title rpoµaxos, the Defender, is found only in connexion with a victory of young men ("ephebes") in a battle at Tanagra. A further point of contact between Hermes and Apollo may here be noted: both had prophetic powers, although Hermes held a place far inferior to that of the Pythian god, and possessed no famous oracle.

Certain forms of popular divination were, however, under his patronage, notably the world-wide process of divination by pebbles (0pcai). The "Homeric" Hymn to Hermes explains these minor gifts of prophecy as delegated by Apollo, who alone knew the mind of Zeus. Only a single oracle is recorded for Hermes, in the market-place of Pharae in Achaea, and here the procedure was akin to popular divination. An altar, furnished with lamps, was placed before the statue; the inquirer, after lighting the lamps and offering incense, placed a coin in the right hand of the god; he then whispered his question into the ear of the statue, and, stopping his own ears, left the market place. The first sound which he heard outside was an omen.

From the foregoing account it will be seen that it is difficult to derive the many-sided character of Hermes from a single elemental conception. The various theories which identified him with the sun, the moon or the dawn, may be dismissed, as they do not rest on evidence to which value would now be attached. The Arcadian or "Pelasgic" Hermes may have been an earth-deity, as his connexion with fertility suggests; but his symbol at Cyllene 2 We only hear of a Hermes S&Xcos at Pellene (Paus. vii. 27.1) and of the custom of allowing promiscuous thieving during the festival of Hermes at Samos (Plut. Quaest. Graec. 55).

rather points to a mere personification of reproductive powers. According to Plutarch the ancients "set Hermes by the side of Aphrodite," i.e. the male and female principles of generation; and the two deities were worshipped together in Argos and elsewhere. But this phallic character does not explain other aspects of Hermes, as the messenger-god, the master-thief or the ideal Greek ephebe. It is impossible to adopt the view that the Homeric poets turned the rude shepherd-god of Arcadia into a messenger, in order to provide him with a place in the Olympian circle. To their Achaean audience Hermes must have been more than a phallic god. It is more probable that the Olympian Hermes represents the fusion of several distinct deities.

Some scholars hold that the various functions of Hermes may have originated from the idea of good luck which is so closely bound up with his character. As a pastoral god he would give luck to the flocks and herds; when worshipped by townspeople, he would give luck to the merchant, the orator, the traveller and the athlete. But though the notion of luck plays an important part in early thought, it seems improbable that the primitive Greeks would have personified a mere abstraction. Another theory, which has much to commend it, has been advanced by Roscher, who sees in Hermes a wind-god. His strongest arguments are that the wind would easily develop into the messenger of the gods (Len oU pos), and that it was often thought to promote fertility in crops and cattle.

Thus the two aspects of Hermes which seem most discordant are referred to a single origin. The Homeric epithet 'ApyEtybO rqs, which the Greeks interpreted as "the slayer of Argus," inventing a myth to account for Argus, is explained as originally an epithet of the wind (apyEO-Tris), which clears away the mists (apyos, q5aivco). The uncertainty of the wind might well suggest the trickery of a thief, and its whistling might contain the germ from which a god of music should be developed. But many of Roscher's arguments are forced, and his method of interpretation is not altogether sound. For example, the last argument would equally apply to Apollo, and would lead to the improbable conclusion that Apollo was a wind-god. It must, in fact, be remembered that men make their gods after their own likeness; and, whatever his origin, Hermes in particular was endowed with many of the qualities and habits of the Greek race. If he was evolved from the wind, his character had become so anthropomorphic that the Greeks had practically lost the knowledge of his primitive significance; nor did Greek cult ever associate him with the wind.

The oldest form under which Hermes was represented was that of the Hermae mentioned above. Alcamenes, the rival or pupil of Pheidias, was the sculptor of a berm at Athens, a copy of which, dating from Roman times, was discovered at Pergamum in 1903. But side by side with the Hermae there grew up a more anthropomorphic conception of the god. In archaic art he was portrayed as a full-grown and bearded man, clothed in a long chiton, and often wearing a cap (Kvvij) or a broad-brimmed hat (74Tao-os), and winged boots.

Sometimes he was represented in his pastoral character, as when he bears a sheep on his shoulders; at other times he appears as the messenger or herald of the gods with the KfpvKEiov, or herald's staff, which is his most frequent attribute. From the latter part of the 5th century his art-type was changed in conformity with the general development of Greek sculpture. He now became a nude and beardless youth, the type of the young athlete. In the 4th century this type was probably fixed by Praxiteles in his statue of Hermes at Olympia.

Authorities.-F. G. Welcker, Griech. Gotterl. i. 342 f. (Göttingen, 1857-1863); L. Preller, ed. C. Robert, Griech. Mythologie, ii. 385 seq. (Berlin, 1894); W. H. Roscher, Lex. der griech. u. reran. Mythologie, s.v. (Leipzig, 1884-1886); A. Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion, ii. 225 seq. (London, 1887); C. Daremberg and E. Saglio, Diet. des ant. grecques et rom.; Farnell, Cults v. (1909); O. Gruppe, Griech. Mythologie u. Religionsgesch. p. 1318 seq. (Munich, 1906). In the article GREEK ART, figs. 43 and 82 (Plate VI.) represent the Hermes of Praxiteles; fig. 57 (Plate II.), a professed copy of the Hermes of Alcamenes. (E. E. S.)


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

.HERMES, a Greek god, identified by the Romans with Mercury.^ Mercury (named after Mercurius, the Roman god of trade identified with Hermes).
  • HERMES : Summary of the Olympian God 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He was the Roman counterpart of Hermes , the Greek messenger of the Gods.
  • Space Today Online - Exploring the planet Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.spacetoday.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Romans identified him with Mercury.
  • HERMES : Greek god of herds, trade & athletics, Herald of the gods ; mythology ; pictures : MERCURY 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

The derivation of his name and his primitive character are very uncertain. .The earliest centres of his cult were Arcadia, where Mt.^ The earliest centre of his cult was probably Arcadia, where Mt.
  • Hermes (Greek mythology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Cyllene was reputed to be his birthplace, the islands of Lemnos, Imbros and Samothrace, in which he was associated with the Cabeiri and Attica.^ Cyllene was reputed to be his birthplace.
  • Hermes (Greek mythology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In Arcadia he was specially worshipped as the god of fertility, and his images were ithyphallic, as also were the "Hermee" at Athens.^ There he was especially worshipped as the god of fertility, and his images were ithyphallic.
  • Hermes (Greek mythology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Also the god of weather (his most famous weapon was the thunderbolt) and fertility, he was worshiped in connection with almost every aspect of life.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Pan , in Greek mythology, pastoral god of fertility (god of woods, fields and flocks); worshiped principally in Arcadia.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

Herodotus (ii. 51) states that the Athenians borrowed this type from the Pelasgians, thus testifying to the great antiquity of the phallic Hermes. At Cyllene in Elis a mere phallus served as his emblem, and was highly venerated in the time of Pausanias (vi. 26.3). Both in literature and cult Hermes was constantly associated with the protection of cattle and sheep; at Tanagra and elsewhere his title was Kpcoc60pos, the ram-bearer. .As a pastoral god he was often closely connected with deities of vegetation, especially Pan and the nymphs.^ However many of the nymphs were unsuccessful in remaining virgin, like their goddess, because the gods often amorously pursue these unwilling nymphs.

^ Pan , in Greek mythology, pastoral god of fertility (god of woods, fields and flocks); worshiped principally in Arcadia.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Unlike their Semitic counterparts, the Greeks claimed no uniqueness for their deities but freely acknowledged that the Olympians often had exact analogues in the gods of other nations.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

.His pastoral character is recognized in the 1 Note the prestige of martyrs and confessors, the ways of true and false prophets in Mand. xi., and the different t y pes of evil and good "walk" among Christians, e.g. in Vis.^ Creating a false-color image in this way accentuates color differences on Mercury's surface that cannot be seen in black-and-white (single-color) images.

^ Patron of: Messages from the gods; Birds of omen; Prophetic dreams; Divination by pebbles Favour: True omens Curse: False or deceptive omens .
  • HERMES : Summary of the Olympian God 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Creating a false-color image in this way accentuates color differences on Mercury's surface that cannot be seen in the single-filter, black-and-white image released last week .

iii.
5-7; Mand. viii.; Sim. viii.
Iliad (xiv. .490) and the later epic hymn to Hermes; and his Homeric titles aKaK1 7 Ta, ipcobvcos, &.'rwp Eawv, probably refer to him as the giver of fertility.^ Homeric Hymn 4 to Hermes (trans.
  • HERMES : Greek god of herds, trade & athletics, Herald of the gods ; mythology ; pictures : MERCURY 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His most typical monument, the herma or herm, was a stone pillar which usually had a carved head on top and a phallus in the center, probably representing the god in his original role as the giver of fertility.
  • Hermes Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Hermes 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Examples occur in the Homeric hymn on Hermes (66, 260, 383; comp.
  • HERMES : Greek god of herds, trade & athletics, Herald of the gods ; mythology ; pictures : MERCURY 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

.In the Odyssey, however, he appears mainly as the messenger of the gods, and the conductor of the dead to Hades.^ In the Odyssey, however, he appears mainly as the messenger of the gods and the conductor of the dead to Hades.
  • Hermes (Greek mythology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His functions were many, but he was primarily the messenger of the gods, particularly of Zeus, and conductor of souls to Hades.
  • Hermes Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Hermes 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ One pantheon has Hades , god of the dead, in the list, but the most common tradition has Demeter , goddess of corn, as the Olympian deity.

.Hence in later times he is often represented in art and mythology as a herald.^ Dionysus , in Greek mythology, god of fertility and wine, later considered a patron of the arts.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

.The conductor of souls was naturally a chthonian god; at Athens there was a festival.^ His functions were many, but he was primarily the messenger of the gods, particularly of Zeus, and conductor of souls to Hades.
  • Hermes Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Hermes 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Ecstasy there was and this fundamental experience must have been a source of religious inspiration, but we find no trace of a mystical union between the soul and God.

^ Hermes , in Greek mythology, son of Zeus and Maia; messenger of the gods and conductor of souls to Hades .
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

in honour of .Hermes and the souls of the dead, and Aeschylus (Persae, 628) invokes Hermes, with Earth and Hades, in summoning a spirit from the underworld.^ Hermes is called Argiphontes, for having killed the All-seeing Argus 1 who guarded Io , and Psychopompus for being the guide of souls to the Underworld .
  • Hermes - Greek Mythology Link 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC homepage.mac.com [Source type: Academic]

^ As a crosser of boundaries, Hermēs Psychopompos ' ( ψυχοπομπός ) ("conductor of the soul") was a psychopomp, meaning he brought newly-dead souls to the underworld, Hades.
  • Hermes / Mercury 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.mlahanas.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The shades of the dead followed Hermes' Caduceus through the passages of Hades.

.The function of a messengergod may have originated the conception of Hermes as a dreamgod; he is called the "conductor of dreams" (17 1 y7 7 7wp ovcipwv), and the Greeks offered to him the last libation before sleep.^ Hermes was also a dream god, and the Greeks offered to him the last libation before sleep.
  • Hermes (Greek mythology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ People familiar with the final report, originally due last May, told the newspaper the study finds that mercury poses a serious health problem for children.
  • Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC vaccinetruth.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Here we are faced with the controversial phenomenon of syncretism, which plays a vital role in the new manifestation of Hermes in the last centuries before Christ and in the early centuries of the Christian era.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

.As a messenger he may also have become the god of roads and doorways; he was the protector of travellers and his images were used for boundary-marks (see Hermae).^ The hermai were used to mark roads and boundaries.
  • Hermes / Mercury 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.mlahanas.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ As a messenger, he may also have become the god of roads and doorways, and he was the protector of travellers.
  • Hermes (Greek mythology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Hermai (stones that marked roads and boundaries - often adorned with the carved head of Hermes and a fertility phallus) .
  • HERMES : Summary of the Olympian God 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

.It was a custom to make a cairn of stones near the wayside statues of Hermes, each passer-by adding a stone; the significance of the practice, which is found in many countries, is discussed by Frazer (Golden Bough, 2nd ed., iii.^ His name is probably derived from herma ( see herm ), the Greek word for a heap of stones, such as was used in the country to indicate boundaries or as a landmark.
  • Hermes (Greek mythology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The price and the time spent on making the bag adds elite status to Hermes products.
  • 85% Off Hermes bags,Discount Hermes handbags,Hermes Birkin bags,Hermes for sale - 85% Off Designer Bags and Wallets,Louis Vuitton handbags,Gucci bags,Chanel bags,LV bags 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.unbags.com [Source type: General]

^ She was trained at Hermes and makes each bag for the individual customer.
  • The Global Expansion of Hermes - The Bag Snob: Reviews of Designer Handbags, Authentic Designer Purses, and Leather Bags 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.bagsnob.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Io f.) and Hartland (Legend of Perseus, ii. 228). .Treasure found in the road ('p,uacov) was the gift of Hermes, and any stroke of good luck was attributed to him; but it may be doubted whether his patronage of luck in general was developed from his function as a god of roads.^ He was god of travelers and roads, of luck, of music and eloquence, of merchants and commerce, of young men, and of cheats and thieves.
  • Hermes Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Hermes 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Who, then, was Hermes, and what may be said of the philosophy or religion that is connected with him?
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The final step was what may be called the Mystery Liturgy of Hermes Trismegistus, of which The Discourse of the Eighth and the Ninth is often regarded as a good example.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

.As the giver of luck he became a deity of gain and commerce (KEpS ios, 6.yopa70s), an aspect which caused his identification with Mercury, the Roman god of trade.^ Mercury (named after Mercurius, the Roman god of trade identified with Hermes).
  • HERMES : Summary of the Olympian God 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It was named after "Mercury" the speedy Roman god.
  • Mercury@Everything2.com 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He was identified as the Roman god, Mercury .

From this conception his thievish character may have been evolved. .The trickery and cunning of Hermes is a Prominent theme in literature from Homer downwards, although it is very rarely recognized in official cult.^ William (Bill) Hubbard with his family edited the Hermes for a period of 24 years and although the ownership had changed the Hermes was still very much a family project with Wendell at the helm.
  • History of "The Hermes" 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC users.pld.com [Source type: News]

^ Although, there is very little information about Hestia in myths and literature, Hestia was nevertheless an important goddess in both Greek and Roman religions.

.2 In the hymn to Hermes the god figures as a precocious child (a type familiar in folk-lore), who when a new-born babe steals the cows of Apollo.^ Dionysus was a god, who was born twice.

^ Hermes notoriety as the thief god comes from that fact that on the evening of his birth, he stole Apollo's sacred cattle.

^ His grandfather is Atlas, the demigod who holds up heaven, but Maia, his mother, already has a goddess as her mother, while Hermes' father, Zeus, is of course the highest of the gods.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

.In addition to these characteristics various other functions were assigned to Hermes, who developed, perhaps, into the most complete type of the versatile Greek.^ Versatility and mutability are Hermes' most prominent characteristics.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They want to poison all who would willingly accept without question these toxins into their bodies.
  • Washington Post: Swine Flu Vaccine Will Contain Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.prisonplanet.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These suits were used in various Mercury training and development programs.

.In many respects he was a counterpart of Apollo, less dignified and powerful, but more human than his greater brother.^ With a history of more than 60 years the Mercury Company has continued to give to the automotive industry in many aspects.
  • Mercury Parts @ iAutoBodyParts.com | Lifetime Guaranteed Mercury Body Parts 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.iautobodyparts.com [Source type: General]

^ Larger, older fish and fish which eat other fish accumulate more contaminants than smaller, younger fish which eat less contaminated prey.
  • Fish Consumption: Frequently Asked Questions - EH: Minnesota Department of Health 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.health.state.mn.us [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The greater mass and gravity of Earth cause its interior to be more highly compressed than Mercury, despite the fact that Earth is, on average, made of lighter stuff.
  • Mercury Facts and Pictures - Explore the Cosmos | The Planetary Society 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC planetary.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Hermes was a patron of music, like Apollo, and invented the cithara; he presided over the games, with Apollo and Heracles, and his statues were common in the stadia and gymnasia.^ Like Apollo, Hermes never married.

^ Another important function of Hermes was his being the patron of all the gymnastic games of the Greeks.
  • HERMES : Greek god of herds, trade & athletics, Herald of the gods ; mythology ; pictures : MERCURY 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermes answered with crafty words that he doesn't know what Apollo was talking about, like "what is this cattle?"

He became, in fact, the ideal Greek youth, equally proficient in the "musical" and "gymnastic" branches of Greek education. .On the "musical" side he was the special patron of eloquence (Mycos); in gymnastic, he was the giver of grace rather than of strength, which was the province of Heracles.^ Rather than erring on the side of caution when making decisions that concern our health, the DEP once again errs on the side of the incinerator operators.
  • Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.shawsheen.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Though athletic, he was one of the least militant of the gods; a title rpoµaxos, the Defender, is found only in connexion with a victory of young men ("ephebes") in a battle at Tanagra.^ He was also the god of travelers, of luck, music, eloquence, commerce, young men, cheats, and thieves.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The variations which occur in these phenomena require a sufficient reason in order to account for them; the variations in the origin of things call for a sufficient and absolute reason for their origin, and this ultimately can only be found in the idea of God .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: George Hermes 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Though, in earlier accounts, Paeëon (Paeeon) may have been a god of healing; but the name may also have been one of Apollo's epithets.

.A further point of contact between Hermes and Apollo may here be noted: both had prophetic powers, although Hermes held a place far inferior to that of the Pythian god, and possessed no famous oracle.^ The enraged Apollo denounces Hermes to Zeus but is mollified by the gift of the lyre, which the young Hermes has just invented by placing strings across the shell of a tortoise.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In Classical Greece it was called Apollo when it appeared as a morning star just before sunrise and Hermes , the Greek equivalent of the Roman god Mercury , when it appeared as an evening star just after sunset.
  • Mercury (planet) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Hermes notoriety as the thief god comes from that fact that on the evening of his birth, he stole Apollo's sacred cattle.

.Certain forms of popular divination were, however, under his patronage, notably the world-wide process of divination by pebbles (0pcai). The "Homeric" Hymn to Hermes explains these minor gifts of prophecy as delegated by Apollo, who alone knew the mind of Zeus.^ Apollo even taught Hermes the art of divining using pebbles.

^ Hermes also was god of divining using pebbles.

^ The enraged Apollo denounces Hermes to Zeus but is mollified by the gift of the lyre, which the young Hermes has just invented by placing strings across the shell of a tortoise.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

.Only a single oracle is recorded for Hermes, in the market-place of Pharae in Achaea, and here the procedure was akin to popular divination.^ Only two single-antigen pediatric hepatitis B vaccines exist on the U.S. market - Engerix-B (SmithKline Beecham) and Recombivax HB (Merck).
  • Vaccines: Vaccinations and Mercury in Vaccines 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.healing-arts.org [Source type: Academic]

^ In the beginning of 1951 there was only one recording of the orchestral version by Maurice Ravel of Modest Mussorgsky's now so popular "Pictures at an Exhibition" available on disc.
  • MERCURY RECORDS Living Presence - Wilma Cozart Fine and 50 Years Mercury Recordings 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.soundfountain.com [Source type: General]

.An altar, furnished with lamps, was placed before the statue; the inquirer, after lighting the lamps and offering incense, placed a coin in the right hand of the god; he then whispered his question into the ear of the statue, and, stopping his own ears, left the market place.^ Ford's mouthpiece continues to deny there's any plan to smother Mercury with its own pillow, but a Ford supplier has whispered something different in the ear of Inside Line.
  • Mercury — Autoblog 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.autoblog.com [Source type: News]

^ And the bright spots in the upper right hand part of the picture are produced by the bright lights of Mercurian cities!
  • MESSENGER at Mercury: HAWESOME | Bad Astronomy | Discover Magazine 11 September 2009 8:27 UTC blogs.discovermagazine.com [Source type: General]

^ Beginning in September 1995, the patient had onset of symptoms progressing to paresthesias (left forearm, right leg, and ear), irritability, and insomnia by March 1996.
  • The Problem With Mercury - Hg = Mercury - a Toxic Element - Avoid Contact at Any Cost ! 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.hbci.com [Source type: Academic]

The first sound which he heard outside was an omen.
From the foregoing account it will be seen that it is difficult to derive the many-sided character of Hermes from a single elemental conception. .The various theories which identified him with the sun, the moon or the dawn, may be dismissed, as they do not rest on evidence to which value would now be attached.^ There is much evidence to support the theory that Mercury once had a much faster rotational period (as quick as 8 hours), but that the Sun has been slowing it down for millions of years.
  • Mercury@Everything2.com 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Should the Florida Dental Board have continued on their original course, with the information they now had in front of them, they too, like in California, would have been history.
  • Amalgam (Mercury Fillings): The great dangers 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.relfe.com [Source type: Academic]

^ Shoppers are valuing fuel efficiency more than before, especially now that they...
  • 2009 Mercury Mariner Reviews and Ratings - The Car Connection 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.thecarconnection.com [Source type: General]

.The Arcadian or "Pelasgic" Hermes may have been an earth-deity, as his connexion with fertility suggests; but his symbol at Cyllene 2 We only hear of a Hermes S&Xcos at Pellene (Paus.^ The later forms of her cult involved the worship of a male deity (her son or lover, e.g., Adonis , Osiris ), whose death and resurrection symbolized the regenerative power of the earth.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Great Mother of the Gods, in ancient Middle Eastern religion (and later in Greece, Rome, and W Asia), mother goddess, the great symbol of the earth's fertility.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

vii. 27.1) and of the custom of allowing promiscuous thieving during the festival of Hermes at Samos (Plut. Quaest. Graec. 55).
rather points to a mere personification of reproductive powers. .According to Plutarch the ancients "set Hermes by the side of Aphrodite," i.e. the male and female principles of generation; and the two deities were worshipped together in Argos and elsewhere.^ She had also struck Aphrodite in the breasts with her two fists, when the love goddess ran to her lover's side.

^ His places of worship were Corinth, Argos, Troezen and Athens, where he vied for recognition against the other deities.

^ Beyond the lawsuit, however, the two sides do appear to be in general agreement.
  • Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.shawsheen.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.But this phallic character does not explain other aspects of Hermes, as the messenger-god, the master-thief or the ideal Greek ephebe.^ In mythology, Hermes served as the messenger of the gods.

^ Hermes is the messenger of Zeus and the herald of the gods.
  • Hermes - Greek Mythology Link 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC homepage.mac.com [Source type: Academic]

^ It's also the symbol that represents the Greek god Hermes, who was the messenger of the gods.

.It is impossible to adopt the view that the Homeric poets turned the rude shepherd-god of Arcadia into a messenger, in order to provide him with a place in the Olympian circle.^ Zeus later led the Olympian gods in defeating him in a battle, described by Hesiod, called the Titanomachy.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Apollo told him there were only eleven gods, but Hermes told his elder half-brother that he himself was to be the twelfth Olympian.

^ She was also able to turn her Sailor Star Tambourine into a different sword in order to fight the Youma created by Princess Sailor Moon in the Final Act .
  • Sailor Mercury - WikiMoon 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC wikimoon.org [Source type: General]

.To their Achaean audience Hermes must have been more than a phallic god.^ Mercury was named by the Romans after the fleet-footed messenger of the gods because it seemed to move more quickly than any other planet.

^ According to the early Roman accounts, Mars was known more as a god of agriculture than that of war.

^ The hermes group plan to open or renew more than a dozen stores,...
  • 85% Off Hermes bags,Discount Hermes handbags,Hermes Birkin bags,Hermes for sale - 85% Off Designer Bags and Wallets,Louis Vuitton handbags,Gucci bags,Chanel bags,LV bags 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.unbags.com [Source type: General]

.It is more probable that the Olympian Hermes represents the fusion of several distinct deities.^ In drawings and paintings, Hermes is represented with having wings coming out of his helmet, so this has probably influenced Mercury 's symbol.

.Some scholars hold that the various functions of Hermes may have originated from the idea of good luck which is so closely bound up with his character.^ His grandfather is Atlas, the demigod who holds up heaven, but Maia, his mother, already has a goddess as her mother, while Hermes' father, Zeus, is of course the highest of the gods.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The variations which occur in these phenomena require a sufficient reason in order to account for them; the variations in the origin of things call for a sufficient and absolute reason for their origin, and this ultimately can only be found in the idea of God .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: George Hermes 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ PART 2: HERMES GOD OF Quotes - describing his various divine functions .
  • HERMES : Summary of the Olympian God 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

.As a pastoral god he would give luck to the flocks and herds; when worshipped by townspeople, he would give luck to the merchant, the orator, the traveller and the athlete.^ He was also the god of travelers, of luck, music, eloquence, commerce, young men, cheats, and thieves.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He is the god of travel and the protector of sacrifices; he is also god of commerce and good luck.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Pan , in Greek mythology, pastoral god of fertility (god of woods, fields and flocks); worshiped principally in Arcadia.
  • MOTHER GODDESS 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC deoxy.org [Source type: Original source]

.But though the notion of luck plays an important part in early thought, it seems improbable that the primitive Greeks would have personified a mere abstraction.^ Would it not be thought that the speaker wanted to amuse himself, and played on the credulity of his listeners?” -The Primitive World, analyzed and compared with the modern world, Vol.
  • College of the Six Days Work - Page 4 - OccultCorpus 15 September 2009 23:023 UTC www.occultcorpus.com [Source type: General]

^ And finally the nature of the work plays an important part in the game.
  • MERCURY RECORDS Living Presence - Wilma Cozart Fine and 50 Years Mercury Recordings 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.soundfountain.com [Source type: General]

.Another theory, which has much to commend it, has been advanced by Roscher, who sees in Hermes a wind-god.^ Our resident Anorak shares the latest theories views and chat on, Lost, Prison Break, Dr Who and much more.
  • SundayMercury.net - Birmingham & Midlands news, sport, jobs & more 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.sundaymercury.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His grandfather is Atlas, the demigod who holds up heaven, but Maia, his mother, already has a goddess as her mother, while Hermes' father, Zeus, is of course the highest of the gods.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermes stole back the sinews of Zeus from the monster Typhoeus who had overcome the king of the gods in battle.
  • HERMES : Summary of the Olympian God 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

.His strongest arguments are that the wind would easily develop into the messenger of the gods (Len oU pos), and that it was often thought to promote fertility in crops and cattle.^ He transformed the tell-tale Battos into a stone for telling Apollon that he was the one who had stolen the god's cattle.
  • HERMES : Summary of the Olympian God 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This special structure prevents many substances from passing into or out of the brain that would easily pass to and from other body cells.
  • Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.tuberose.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He was considered to be the messenger of the gods, and is also said to have guided the souls of the dead into Hades , taking the role of a psychopomp .
  • Mercury@Everything2.com 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Thus the two aspects of Hermes which seem most discordant are referred to a single origin.^ Hermes is thus of a double origin.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Hermes was the swift messenger of the gods, and the planet’s name is thus likely a reference to its rapid motions relative to other objects in the sky.
  • Mercury (planet) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Personalities dominated by the perspective of Hermes seem to be interested in the hidden side of things, the enfolded or implicate aspect.

The Homeric epithet 'ApyEtybO rqs, which the Greeks interpreted as "the slayer of Argus," inventing a myth to account for Argus, is explained as originally an epithet of the wind (apyEO-Tris), which clears away the mists (apyos, q5aivco). .The uncertainty of the wind might well suggest the trickery of a thief, and its whistling might contain the germ from which a god of music should be developed.^ Originally Posted by Kurt Vonnegut "If I should die, let this be my epitaph: his only proof for the existence of God was music" .
  • College of the Six Days Work - Page 4 - OccultCorpus 15 September 2009 23:023 UTC www.occultcorpus.com [Source type: General]

But many of Roscher's arguments are forced, and his method of interpretation is not altogether sound. .For example, the last argument would equally apply to Apollo, and would lead to the improbable conclusion that Apollo was a wind-god.^ Because Achilles had killed his son Tenes, king of Tenedos, in the first year of the war, Apollo would be responsible for Achilles' death in the last year of the war.

.It must, in fact, be remembered that men make their gods after their own likeness; and, whatever his origin, Hermes in particular was endowed with many of the qualities and habits of the Greek race.^ Now speech, my son, God imparted to all men; but Mind (Nous) he did not impart to all" Hermes to Tat "Leap clear of all that is...
  • Lists & Guides tagged with hermes 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.amazon.com [Source type: General]

^ Hermes was the swift messenger of the gods, and the planet’s name is thus likely a reference to its rapid motions relative to other objects in the sky.
  • Mercury (planet) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ However many of the nymphs were unsuccessful in remaining virgin, like their goddess, because the gods often amorously pursue these unwilling nymphs.

If he was evolved from the wind, his character had become so anthropomorphic that the Greeks had practically lost the knowledge of his primitive significance; nor did Greek cult ever associate him with the wind.
The oldest form under which Hermes was represented was that of the Hermae mentioned above. .Alcamenes, the rival or pupil of Pheidias, was the sculptor of a berm at Athens, a copy of which, dating from Roman times, was discovered at Pergamum in 1903. But side by side with the Hermae there grew up a more anthropomorphic conception of the god.^ Mercury was named by the Romans after the fleet-footed messenger of the gods because it seemed to move more quickly than any other planet.

^ Particles are about 5 to 10 cycles long, so for "speeds" up to 10 times c it makes sense that tunneling could be more easily explained by particle action then by wave action.
  • Steorn forum - Scientists break speed of light 15 September 2009 23:023 UTC www.steorn.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ They emit up to 50 times more mercury than the earlier, conventional amalgam fillings.
  • Mercury 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC www.tuberose.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In archaic art he was portrayed as a full-grown and bearded man, clothed in a long chiton, and often wearing a cap (Kvvij) or a broad-brimmed hat (74Tao-os), and winged boots.^ Thoth's animal form is that of the ibis, with its long, slightly curved beak: statues of Thoth often portray a majestic human wearing the mask of head of this bird; others simply display the ibis itself.
  • Hermes and Hermeticism 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.gnosis.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A travelling hat, with a broad brim, which in later times was adorned with two little wings; the latter, however, are sometimes seen arising from his locks, his head not being covered with the hat.
  • HERMES : Greek god of herds, trade & athletics, Herald of the gods ; mythology ; pictures : MERCURY 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Fleet of foot , he is often pictured wearing either winged sandals ( talaria ) or a winged cap (a petasus ), and he is frequently portrayed carrying a caduceus , a staff of hazel (or willow ) entwined with snakes, which served to protect him in his travels.
  • Mercury@Everything2.com 2 February 2010 9:09 UTC everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Sometimes he was represented in his pastoral character, as when he bears a sheep on his shoulders; at other times he appears as the messenger or herald of the gods with the KfpvKEiov, or herald's staff, which is his most frequent attribute.^ Herald and messenger of the gods.

^ Hermes was the patron god of heralds and messengers.

^ Mercury was named by the Romans after the fleet-footed messenger of the gods because it seemed to move more quickly than any other planet.

From the latter part of the 5th century his art-type was changed in conformity with the general development of Greek sculpture. He now became a nude and beardless youth, the type of the young athlete. In the 4th century this type was probably fixed by Praxiteles in his statue of Hermes at Olympia.
Authorities.-F. G. Welcker, Griech. Gotterl. i. 342 f. (Göttingen, 1857-1863); L. Preller, ed. C. Robert, Griech. Mythologie, ii. 385 seq. (Berlin, 1894); W. H. Roscher, Lex. der griech. u. reran. Mythologie, s.v. (Leipzig, 1884-1886); A. Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion, ii. 225 seq. (London, 1887); C. Daremberg and E. Saglio, Diet. des ant. grecques et rom.; Farnell, Cults v. (1909); O. Gruppe, Griech. Mythologie u. Religionsgesch. p. 1318 seq. (Munich, 1906). In the article GREEK ART, figs. 43 and 82 (Plate VI.) represent the Hermes of Praxiteles; fig. 57 (Plate II.), a professed copy of the Hermes of Alcamenes. (E. E. S.)


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also Hermès

Contents

English

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Etymology

.From the Ancient Greek Ἑρμῆς, itself of unknown meaning and origin.^ It is derived from the Greek karykeion = "herald's staff", itself based on the word "eruko" meaning restrain, control.
  • Caduceus vs Staff of Asclepius 10 January 2010 8:08 UTC drblayney.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Proper noun

Hermes
Singular
Hermes
Plural
-
Hermes
  1. (Greek mythology) the herald and messenger of the gods, and the god of roads, commerce, invention, cunning, and theft.

Translations

See also


Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Conus (Hermes) article)

From Wikispecies

Taxonavigation

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Unikonta
Cladus: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Protostomia
Cladus: Spiralia
Cladus: Lophotrochozoa
Phylum: Mollusca
Classis: Gastropoda
Subclassis: Orthogastropoda
Superordo: Caenogastropoda
Ordo: Sorbeoconcha
Subordo: Hypsogastropoda
Infraordo: Neogastropoda
Superfamilia: Conoidea
Familia: Conidae
Subfamilia: Coninae
Genus: Conus
Subgenus: C. (Hermes)
Species: C. (H.) attenuatus - C. (H.) coccineus - C. (H.) coffeae - C. (H.) eversoni - C. (H.) flavescens - C. (H.) glans - C. (H.) glicksteini - C. (H.) granulatus - C. (H.) granum - C. (H.) luteus - C. (H.) mitratus - C. (H.) nussatella - C. (H.) paraguana - C. (H.) sanderi - C. (H.) tenuistriatus - C. (H.) venezuelanus

Name

Conus (Hermes) Montfort, 1810

Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

Mercury, a Roman Christian (Rom 16:14).
This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.
what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)
Facts about HermesRDF feed

Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 14, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Mercury (planet), which are similar to those in the above article.








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