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Hertfordshire
Hertsflag.jpg
Flag of Hertfordshire
Motto of County Council: Trust and fear not
EnglandHertfordshire.svg
Geography
Status Ceremonial & Non-metropolitan county
Origin Historic
Region East of England[1]
Area
- Total
- Admin. council
Ranked 36th
1,643 km2 (634 sq mi)
Ranked 32nd
Admin HQ Hertford
ISO 3166-2 GB-HRT
ONS code 26
NUTS 3 UKH23
Demography
Population
- Total (2008 est.)
- Density
- Admin. council
Ranked 14th
1,078,400
656 /km2 (1,699/sq mi)
Ranked 6th
Ethnicity 88.8% White British
1.7% White Irish
3.2% White Other
1.6% Indian
Politics
Arms of Hertfordshire County Council
Hertfordshire County Council
http://www.hertsdirect.org/
Executive Conservative
Members of Parliament
Districts
HertfordshireNumbered.png
  1. Three Rivers
  2. Watford
  3. Hertsmere
  4. Welwyn Hatfield
  5. Broxbourne
  6. East Hertfordshire
  7. Stevenage
  8. North Hertfordshire
  9. St Albans
  10. Dacorum

Hertfordshire (pronounced /ˈhɑrfərdʃər/ or /ˈhɑrtfərdʃɪər/  ( listen)), abbreviated Herts, is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in the East region of England. The county town is Hertford.

The county is one of the Home Counties and lies inland, bordered by Greater London, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire (the unitary authorities of Luton and Central Bedfordshire), Cambridgeshire and Essex. Hertfordshire is well known as being the birthplace of Pope Adrian IV, the only pope ever from the British Isles.

Contents

History

Hertfordshire was originally the area assigned to a fortress constructed at Hertford under the rule of Edward the Elder in 913. The name Hertford is derived from the Anglo-Saxon heort ford, meaning deer crossing (of a watercourse). The name Hertfordshire first appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 1011. Deer feature prominently in many county emblems.

There is evidence of human beings living in Hertfordshire since the Middle Stone Age. It was first farmed during the Neolithic period and permanent habitation appeared at the beginning of the Bronze Age. This was followed by tribes settling in the area during the Iron Age.

Following the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43, Hertfordshire adapted quickly to the Roman way of life; one of the new towns, Verulamium, became the third largest town in Roman Britain. After the Romans left Britain, the Anglo-Saxons occupied the area, creating their own towns, including the county town of Hertford.

The Norman conquest in 1066 reached its climax at Berkhamsted where William the Conqueror accepted the final Saxon surrender. After the Norman conquest, Hertfordshire was used for some of the new Norman castles at Bishop's Stortford and at the royal residence of Berkhamsted.

The Domesday Book recorded the county as having nine hundreds. Tring and Danais became one, Dacorum, from (Danis Corum or Danish rule harking back to a Viking not Saxon past). The other seven were Braughing, Broadwater, Cashio, Edwinstree, Hertford, Hitchin and Odsey.

As London grew, Hertfordshire became conveniently close to the English capital; much of the area was owned by the nobility and aristocracy, this patronage helped to boost the local economy. However, the greatest boost to Hertfordshire came during the Industrial Revolution, after which the population rose dramatically. In 1903, Letchworth became the world's first garden city and Stevenage became the first town to redevelop under the New Towns Act 1946.

From the 1920s until the late 1980s, the town of Borehamwood was home to one of the major British film studio complexes, including the MGM-British Studios. Many well-known films were made here including the first three Star Wars movies (IV, V, & VI). The studios generally used the name of Elstree (the adjoining village). In more recent times, Elstree has had the likes of Big Brother UK and Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? filmed there, whilst EastEnders is also filmed at the studios. Also Hertfordshire has seen development in other film studio complexes, Leavesden Film Studios were developed on the Leavesden Aerodome site. The Harry Potter series was filmed at the studios, whilst the 1996 James Bond film GoldenEye was also filmed there.[2]

On 17 October 2000, the Hatfield rail crash killed four people with 170 injured. The crash exposed the shortcomings of Railtrack, which consequently saw speed restrictions and major track replacement. On 10 May 2002, the second of the Potters Bar rail accidents occurred killing seven people; the train was at high speed when it derailed and flipped into the air when one of the carriage's slid along the platform where it came to rest. In early December 2005 the 2005 Hemel Hempstead fuel depot explosions occurred at the Hertfordshire Oil Storage Terminal.

In 2012, the town of Waltham Cross, within the borough of Broxbourne, will host the canoe and kayak slalom events of the 2012 Summer Olympic Games.

Following a proposal put forward by The Welwyn Garden Heritage Trust, town-planner Andrés Duany has suggested that designated "Garden Villages" could be built within Hertfordshire to relieve some of the pressure for new homes, with perhaps a third Garden City to follow.[citation needed]

Geography

Hertfordshire is located immediately to the north of Greater London and is part of the East of England Government Office Region.[1] Much of the county is part of the London commuter belt. To the east of Hertfordshire is Essex, to the west is Buckinghamshire and to the north are Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire.

The county's boundaries were fixed by the Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844 which eliminated exclaves. They were amended when, in 1965 under the London Government Act 1963, East Barnet Urban District and Barnet Urban District were abolished and their area was transferred to Greater London to form part of the present-day London Borough of Barnet. At the same time the Potters Bar Urban District of Middlesex was transferred to Hertfordshire.

The highest point in the county is 803 feet (245 m) above sea level, a quarter mile (400 m) from the village of Hastoe near Tring.[citation needed]

As part of a 2002 marketing campaign, the plant conservation charity Plantlife chose the Pasqueflower as Hertfordshire's county flower.[citation needed]

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Geology

The rocks of Hertfordshire belong to the great shallow syncline known as the London Basin. The beds dip in a south-easterly direction towards the syncline's lowest point roughly under the River Thames. The most important formations are the Cretaceous Chalk, exposed as the high ground in the north and west of the county, forming the Chiltern Hills and the younger Palaeocene, Reading Beds and Eocene, London Clay which occupy the remaining southern part. The eastern half of the county was covered by glaciers during the Ice Age and has a superficial layer of glacial boulder clays.

Natural resources and environment

Despite the spread of built areas, much of the county is given over to agriculture. One product, now largely defunct, was water-cress, based in Hemel Hempstead and Berkhamsted supported by reliable, clean chalk rivers.

Some quarrying of sand and gravel occurs in the St. Albans area. In the past, clay has supplied local brick-making and still does in Bovingdon, just south-west of Hemel Hempstead. The chalk that is the bedrock of much of the county provides an aquifer that feeds streams and is also exploited to provide water supplies for much of the county and beyond. Chalk has also been used as a building material and, once fired, the resultant lime was spread on agricultural land to improve fertility. The mining of chalk since the early 18th century has left unrecorded underground galleries that occasionally collapse unexpectedly and endanger buildings.[3]

Fresh water is supplied to London from Ware, using the New River built by Hugh Myddleton and opened in 1613. Local rivers, although small, supported developing industries such as paper production at Nash Mills.

Hertfordshire affords habitat for a variety of flora and fauna. One bird common in the shire is the Royston Crow, which is the eponymous name of the regional newspaper, the Royston Crow published in Royston.

Urban areas

Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Hertfordshire at current basic prices published (pp.240–253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.

Year Regional Gross Value Added[notes 1] Agriculture[notes 2] Industry[notes 3] Services[notes 4]
1995 11,742 96 3,292 8,354
2000 18,370 77 4,138 14,155
2003 20,937 82 4,348 16,507

Hertfordshire has headquarters of many large well-known UK companies. Hemel Hempstead is home to DSG International. Tesco are based in Cheshunt. Pure Digital the DAB radio maker is based in Kings Langley. JD Wetherspoon is in Watford. Comet and Skanska are in Rickmansworth, whilst GlaxoSmithKline has plants in Ware and Stevenage. Hatfield used to be connected with the aircraft industry, as it was where de Havilland developed the world's first commercial jet liner, the Comet. Now the site is a business park and new campus for the University of Hertfordshire. This major new employment site is home to, among others, T-Mobile, Computacenter and Ocado. A subsidiary of BAE Systems, EADS and Finmeccanica in Stevenage, MBDA, develops missiles. In the same town EADS Astrium produces satellites. The National Pharmacy Association (NPA), the trade association for all of the UK's community pharmacies, is based in St. Albans.

The loss of aircraft manufacture at Hatfield is just one of a number of industrial losses as companies capitalise on land values and move to regions where land is cheaper and recruitment is easier.[citation needed] Examples include Scammell, (formerly of Watford), DRG (Hemel Hempstead) and Lucas (also Hemel). In general, the land thus freed has been used for housing or service industries.

Landmarks

Below is a list of places, large and small, to visit in Hertfordshire.

Transport

Hertfordshire lies across routes between London and the North, the North-West and the Midlands and as a consequence it is well-served by road and rail routes and, in the past, by canals.

The county has always been traversed by some of the principal roads in England, originally the A1 (Great North Road) to Yorkshire and Scotland, A5 (Watling Street) to North Wales, A6 to North West England and the A41 (Sparrows Herne turnpike) to the Midlands and now the M1, M11, A1(M) and the M25.

Principal rail routes lie through Stevenage to Yorkshire and Scotland, and through Watford to the Midlands, north Wales, the North West and Glasgow. Lesser routes serve St. Albans (and the East Midlands) and Royston (to Cambridge and Norwich). Commuter routes supplement the through routes and the London Underground extends to Watford.

Two international airports lie just outside the county Stansted and Luton. At Elstree, there is a busy airfield for light aircraft.

The Grand Union Canal passes west Hertfordshire, through Watford, Hemel Hempstead and Berkhamsted.

Education

Hertfordshire has 26 independent schools and 73 state secondary schools. The state secondary schools are entirely comprehensive, although 7 schools in the south and southwest of the county are partially selective (see Education in Watford). All state schools have sixth forms, and there are no sixth form colleges. The tertiary colleges, each with multiple campuses, are Hertford Regional College, North Hertfordshire College, Oaklands College and West Herts College. The University of Hertfordshire is a modern university based largely in Hatfield. It has more than 23,000 students.

Literature

Hertfordshire is the location of Jack Worthing's country house in Oscar Wilde's play The Importance of Being Earnest.

Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice is primarily set in Hertfordshire. Topographical scholars place the town of Meryton either as Hertford or Hemel Hempstead, based on how far Mr Collins travels on the post from Watford, in either an easterly or westerly direction. The former location places the Bennet family home Longbourn as the town of Ware.

The eponymous residence in E. M. Forster's novel, Howards End was based on Rooks Nest House just outside Stevenage. In the novel, Forster describes Hertfordshire as "England at its quietest".[4]

Notes

  1. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  2. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  3. ^ includes energy and construction
  4. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured

References

  1. ^ a b "The East of England". East of England Regional Assembly. http://www.eera.gov.uk/category.asp?cat=390. Retrieved 2007-11-14. 
  2. ^ http://www.filmlondon.org.uk/content.asp?CategoryID=836
  3. ^ "About the chalk mines". Dacorum Borough Council. 2008. http://www.dacorum.gov.uk/default.aspx?page=5692. Retrieved 7 Feb 2009. 
  4. ^ http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext01/hoend10h.htm Gutenberg etext

Coordinates: 51°54′N 0°12′W / 51.9°N 0.2°W / 51.9; -0.2

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Contents

Hertfordshire is a county in eastern England, located north of London, in the region known as East Anglia.

Map of Hertfordshire
Map of Hertfordshire
  • Hatfield House
  • Wimpole Farm
  • Whipsnade London Zoological Society Wildpark
  • Natural History Museum - Tring

Get in

Hertfordshire is to the north of London and is easily accessible by train. Trains from London Kings Cross will take you to St Albans and trains from London Euston will stop in Watford and Hemel Hempstead. Any of the major roads heading north out of London will pass through Hertfordshire. London's 3rd airport at Stansted connects to many international destinations, and connects to the train services, offering connecetions to London or Cambridge.

Get around

Rail links, as mentioned, run north-south but there are no services running east-west across the county so the alternative is bus/coach travel or car

Eat

The [1] riverside garden centre in hertford has a fantastic restaurant by the river side which serves a superb selection of meals to set the tastebuds racing. From a magnificent traditional English breakfast to light lunches, hot and cold snacks, excellent main meals to fresh cream teas.

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Database error article)

From LoveToKnow 1911

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Proper noun

Singular
Hertfordshire

Plural
-

Hertfordshire

  1. An inland county of south-east England bordered by Cambridgeshire, Essex, Middlesex, Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire.

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
Hertfordshire
Image:EnglandHertfordshire.png
Geography
Status Ceremonial & Non-metropolitan county
Origin Historic
Region: East of England[1]
Area
- Total
- Admin. council
Ranked 36th
634 miles² (1,643 km²)
Ranked 32nd
Admin HQ: Hertford
ISO 3166-2: GB-HRT
ONS code: 26
NUTS 3: UKH23
Demographics
Population
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
- Admin. Council
Ranked 16th Image:Wp_globe_tiny.gif
1,058,600


644

/ km²
Ranked 6th Image:Wp_globe_tiny.gif
Ethnicity: 88.8% White British
1.7% White Irish
3.2% White Other
1.6% Indian
Politics
File:Arms-herts.jpg
Hertfordshire County Council
http://www.hertsdirect.org/
Executive Conservative
Members of Parliament
Districts
File:HertfordshireNumbered.png
  1. Three Rivers
  2. Watford
  3. Hertsmere
  4. Welwyn Hatfield
  5. Broxbourne
  6. East Hertfordshire
  7. Stevenage
  8. North Hertfordshire
  9. St Albans
  10. Dacorum
For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire.

Hertfordshire Image:Ltspkr.png (pronounced [ˈhɑːtfʊdʃə] or [ˈhɑːʔfʊdʃə], abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in England and one of the Home Counties. The etymological root of the name is the Anglo-Saxon heort ford, meaning deer crossing (of a watercourse). Deer feature prominently in many county emblems.

Hertfordshire has a history dating back to the Middle Stone Age. The area was first farmed during the Neolithic period, and permanent habitation appeared at the beginning of the Bronze Age. This was followed by tribes settling in the area during the Iron Age. Following the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43, Hertfordshire adapted quickly to the Roman way of life, and one of the new towns, Verulamium, became the third largest town in Roman Britain. After the Romans left Britain, the Anglo-Saxons occupied the area, creating their own towns, including the county town of Hertford. After the Norman conquest of 1066, Hertfordshire was used for some of the new Norman castles at Bishop's Stortford and Berkhamsted. As London grew bigger, Hertfordshire became conveniently close to the English capital, and much of the area was owned by the nobility and aristocracy, and this patronage helped to boost the local economy. However, the biggest boost to Hertfordshire came during the Industrial Revolution, after which the population rose dramatically. In 1903, Letchworth became the world's first Garden City, and Stevenage became the first Hertfordshire town to redevelop under the New Towns Act 1946.

Contents

Geography

Hertfordshire is located immediately to the north of Greater London, and is part of the East of England Government Office Region.[1] Much of the county is part of the London commuter belt. To the east of Hertfordshire is Essex, to the west is Buckinghamshire and to the north are Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire.

The highest point in the county is 803 feet (245 m) above sea level, a quarter mile (400 m) from the village of Hastoe near Tring. The county motto, is "Trust and fear not". As part of a 2002 marketing campaign, the plant conservation charity Plantlife chose the Pasqueflower as Hertfordshire's county flower.

History

Main article: History of Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire was originally the area assigned to a fortress constructed at Hertford under the rule of Edward the Elder in 913. The name Hertfordshire appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 1011.

The Domesday Book recorded the county as having nine hundreds. Tring and Danais became one, Dacorum. The other seven were Braughing, Broadwater, Cashio, Edwinstree, Hertford, Hitchin and Odsey.

Hertfordshire is the starting point of the New River: a man made waterway, opened in 1613 to supply London with fresh drinking water.

In 1965 under the London Government Act 1963 East Barnet Urban District and Barnet Urban District were abolished and their area was transferred to Greater London to form part of the present-day London Borough of Barnet. At the same time the Potters Bar Urban District of Middlesex was transferred to Hertfordshire.

From the 1920s until the late 1980s, the town of Borehamwood was home to one of the major British film studio complexes, including the MGM-British Studios. Many well known films were made here: for example, all the Harry Potter films were made at Leavesden Studios near Watford.

In early December 2005 the 2005 Hemel Hempstead fuel depot explosions occurred at the Hertfordshire Oil Storage Terminal.

In 2012, the Hertfordshire town of Broxbourne will host the canoe and kayak slalom events of the 2012 Summer Olympic Games.

Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Hertfordshire at current basic prices published (pp.240-253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.

Year Regional Gross Value Added[2] Agriculture[3] Industry[4] Services[5]
1995 11,742 96 3,292 8,354
2000 18,370 77 4,138 14,155
2003 20,937 82 4,348 16,507

Hertfordshire has headquarters of many large well-known UK companies. Hemel Hempstead is home to DSG International. Tesco are based in Cheshunt. Pure Digital the DAB radio maker is based in Kings Langley. JD Wetherspoon is in Watford. Shredded Wheat and Shreddies are made in Welwyn Garden City. Comet and Skanska are in Rickmansworth. Hatfield used to be connected with the aircraft industry, as it was where de Havilland developed the first commercial jet liner, the Comet. Now the site is a business park and new campus for the University of Hertfordshire. This major new employment site is home to, among others, T-Mobile, Computacenter and Ocado. A subsidiary of BAE Systems, EADS and Finmeccanica in Stevenage, MBDA, develops missiles. In the same town EADS Astrium produces satellites.

The loss of aircraft manufacture at Hatfield is just one of a number of industrial losses as companies capitalise on land values and move to regions where land is cheaper and recruitment is easier. Examples include Scammell, (formerly of Watford), DRG (Hemel Hempstead) and Lucas (also Hemel). In general, the land thus freed has been used for housing or service industries.

Transport

Hertfordshire lies across routes between London and the North, the North-West and the Midlands and as a consequence it is well-served by road and rail routes and, in the past, by canals.

Road

The county has always been traversed by some of the principal roads in England, originally the A1 to Yorkshire and Scotland, A5 to North Wales, A6 to north-west England and the A41 to the Midlands and now the M1, M11, A1(M) and the M25.

Rail

Principal rail routes lie through Stevenage to Yorkshire and Scotland, and through Watford to the Midlands, Wales, the north-west and Glasgow. Lesser routes serve St Albans (and the East Midlands) and Royston (to Cambridge and Norwich). Commuter routes supplement the through routes and the London Underground extends to Watford.

Air

There is an international airport at Stansted and another just outside the county at Luton. At Elstree, there is a busy airfield for light aircraft.

Canals

The Grand Union Canal passes west Hertfordshire, through Watford, Hemel Hempstead and Berkhamsted.

Natural resouces

Despite the spread of built areas, much of the county is given over to agriculture, mainly arable. One product, now largely defunct, was water-cress, supported by reliable, clean rivers.

Some quarrying of sand and gravel occurs in the St Albans area. In the past, clay has supplied local brick-making.

Fresh water is supplied to London from Ware, using the New River built by Hugh Myddleton. Most of the county's own supply comes from the chalk aquifer. Local rivers, although small, supported developing industries such as paper production at Nash Mills.

Education

Hertfordshire has an entirely comprehensive system in its state schools, with 26 independent schools and 73 state schools. All state schools have sixth forms, and there are few tertiary colleges and no sixth form colleges. The state schools do well, but performance of schools is far from uniform, and barely looks 'comprehensive' per se in some districts, specifically Watford, Hertsmere and St Albans. Watford's separate Grammar Schools for Girls and Boys although comprehensive get results very similar to their namesake grammar schools, with the other two schools in the district being low performing. Overall, Hertfordshire gets 53.7% of pupils achieving 5 GCSEs at grades A-C including English and Maths. The average for England is 45.8%. St Albans has the highest school population, with Watford the lowest (four schools). The best performing state schools at GCSE are the two non-selective Watford Grammar Schools, followed by Dame Alice Owen's School in Potters Bar, Loreto College, Parmiter's School in Garston, St. George's School, Rickmansworth School, Hitchin Girls' School, The Hertfordshire and Essex High School in Bishop's Stortford and St Albans Girls' School. The worst performing school is Bushey Hall School. There are no bad schools in the Three Rivers district, and overall at GCSE, Hertfordshire does much better than many parts of England. At A-level, it has some good schools with the top three being Hockerill Anglo-European College in Bishop's Stortford, Sir John Lawes School in Harpenden, and The Broxbourne School. For all types of school at A-level, the best school is the independent Merchant Taylor's School near Rickmansworth, followed by St Albans School. Although at GCSE, Hertfordshire is much better than many areas, at A level if looked at overall, it performs under the England average due to wide variation over the county.

Average score at GCSE by council district (%)

% of pupils gaining 5 grades A-C including English and Maths in 2006; compare to average house price by district.

  • Three Rivers 76.1
  • East Hertfordshire 64.9
  • St Albans 62.6
  • Watford 58.0
  • North Hertfordshire 56.0
  • Hertsmere 49.6
  • Dacorum 48.1
  • Welwyn Hatfield 46.3
  • Broxbourne 45.1
  • Stevenage 41.0

Geology

Main article: Geology of Hertfordshire

The rocks of Hertfordshire belong to the great shallow syncline known as the London basin. The beds dip in a south-easterly direction towards the syncline's lowest point roughly under the River Thames. The most important formations are the Cretaceous Chalk, which is exposed as the high ground in the north and west of the county and the younger Palaeocene, Reading Beds and Eocene, London Clay which occupy the remaining southern part. The eastern half of the county was covered by glaciers during the Ice Age and has a superficial layer of glacial boulder clays.

Urban areas

These are the main towns in Hertfordshire. For a complete list of settlements see list of places in Hertfordshire.

References

  1. ^ a b The East of England. East of England Regional Assembly. Retrieved on 2007-11-14.
  2. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  3. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  4. ^ includes energy and construction
  5. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured

External links


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Hertfordshire. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

This article uses material from the "Hertfordshire" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

Hertfordshire is a county in England. It is one of the so called Home Counties, those counties that border or surround London. The county also surrounds Essex, Cambridgeshire, Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire.


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