Highland Park, Illinois: Wikis

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Highland Park
City
Country United States
State Illinois
County Lake
Township Moraine, North Deerfield
Coordinates 42°10′57″N 87°48′25″W / 42.1825°N 87.80694°W / 42.1825; -87.80694
Area 8.3 sq mi (21 km2)
Population 33,492 (2009)
Density 2,537.5 /sq mi (980 /km2)
Founded 1869
Mayor Michael D. Belsky
Timezone CST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Postal code 60035, 60037
Area code 847, 224, 773
Location of Highland Park within Illinois
Location of Highland Park within Illinois
Wikimedia Commons: Highland Park, Illinois
Website: www.cityhpil.com

Highland Park is a city in the Moraine Township of Lake County, Illinois, United States. The population was 31,365 at the 2000 census. It now has 33,492 citizens as of September 28, 2009. Highland Park is one of several affluent towns on the North Shore of Chicago. The city evolved from two settlements: St. John and Port Clinton[1], but the main downtown area was known as Port Clinton and was a lumber port.

Contents

Overview

Highland Park has several attractions including a downtown shopping district and Ravinia Festival, the summer home of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and a nightly music program covering classical, blues, jazz and rock.

The Ravinia Festival is located in the Ravinia District, an area in the southern part of Highland Park that was incorporated as the Village of Ravinia before being annexed to Highland Park, in 1899. The Ravinia District was originally an artists' colony and still retains much of its early character and architecture.

The Willits House

Highland Park has several landmark structures listed in the National Register of Historic Places, notably the Willits House, by Frank Lloyd Wright. In addition to several houses designed by Wright, the National Register lists homes designed by prominent architects including John S. Van Bergen, Howard Van Doren Shaw, Robert E. Seyfarth, and David Adler. Landscape architect Jens Jensen lived in Highland Park and designed a number of projects in the community that are listed on the register.

The international headquarters of the Solo Cup Company was formerly located in Highland Park, before relocating to neighboring Lake Forest in 2009.

The Mayor of Highland Park is Michael D. Belsky. The six City Council representatives are: Jim Kirsch, Scott Levenfeld, Steve Mandel, Terri Olian, Larry Silberman, and the newly elected Nancy Rotering.

Highland Park is located at 42°10′57″N 87°48′25″W / 42.1825°N 87.80694°W / 42.1825; -87.80694 (42.182525, -87.807052).[2]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 12.4 square miles (32.0 km²), of which, 12.3 square miles (31.7 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km²) is water. Its geographic features include a 100 foot (30 m) high bluff running along 6 miles (9.7 km) of Lake Michigan shoreline and deep, wooded ravines extending up to one mile (1.6 kilometers) inland. Elevations range from 580 feet (177 m) to 725 feet (218 m).

Transportation

Highland Park Metra station

The main highway in Highland Park is US-41, which connects Chicago to Milwaukee. Commuter rail is available at six Metra stations (Braeside, Ravinia Park, Ravinia, Highland Park, Highwood, and Fort Sheridan) on the Union Pacific North Line, which begins in Chicago and terminates in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Pace also offers several bus routes. Boat launch facilities are available along Lake Michigan, and O'Hare International Airport is located approximately 20 miles (32 km) southwest.

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 31,365 people, 11,521 households and 8,917 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,537.5 people per square mile (979.8/km²). There were 11,934 housing units at an average density of 965.5/sq mi (372.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.20 percent White, 1.78 percent African American, 0.08 percent Native American, 2.28 percent Asian, 0.01 percent Pacific Islander, 3.46 percent from other races, and 1.18 percent from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.90 percent of the population.[citation needed]

As of the 2000 census, there were 11,521 households out of which 36.9 percent had children under age 18 living with them, 69.9 percent were married couples, 5.8 percent had a female householder with no husband present and 22.6 percent were non-families. Nineteen-point-five percent of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3 percent had someone living alone who was 65-years-old, or older. The average household size was 2.71 people and the average family size was 3.09 people.[citation needed]

As of the 2000 census, in the city, the population was spread out with 27.0 percent under age 18, 4.6 percent from 18-to-24-years-old, 25.5 percent from 25-to-44-years-old, 27.8 percent from 45-to-64-years-old, and 15.1 percent who were 65-years-old, or older. The median age was 41-years-old. For every 100 females there were 95.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.[citation needed]

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $113,350, and the median income for a family was $137,703.[4] Males had a median income of $83,121 versus $41,175 for females. The per capita income for the city was $55,331. About 2.3 percent of families and 3.8 percent of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9 percent of those under age 18 and 3.1 percent of those age 65 or over.[citation needed]

Notable residents

Highland Park is where Elisha Gray invented and demonstrated a telephone in 1874;[5] his Hazel Avenue house still stands.

The town is popular with professional athletes, as the Chicago Bulls and Chicago Bears practice facilities are nearby in Deerfield and Lake Forest, respectively. The most famous current resident is undoubtedly Michael Jordan, whose 25,000-square-foot (2,300 m2) home is on several acres behind large iron gates bearing the number 23. His neighbors include ex-teammate Toni Kukoč and former Chicago Bulls general manager Jerry Krause. Former Chicago Bears starting quarterback Kyle Orton also lives in Highland Park.

Other notable persons associated with Highland Park include:

Actors
Artists
  • Jennifer Gordon
Astronaut
Attorney
Broadcast/Journalists
Education
Engineers
Film critic
Film directors
Food Technologists
  • Michael Gordon, Product Development Manager, Georgia Nut Company
Military
Music
Sports
U.S. Representatives
Writers

In popular culture

Highland Park is the location of the former home of the main characters in the CBS drama The Good Wife.

Highland Park was used for location shots for several movies written and directed by John Hughes in the 1980s including Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Weird Science, Sixteen Candles, Uncle Buck and Home Alone. Other popular films from the 1980s shot or partially set in Highland Park include: Ordinary People, Risky Business, and Lucas. Since 2000, Highland Park movies have included Kicking & Screaming and Shattered Glass

It also was the setting for the 2000/2001 Fox and PBS documentary show American High.

Sister cities

Highland Park has two sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

Highland Park will be a sister city with Kiryat Gat, Israel[6]

See also

References

http://www.aclu.org/racialjustice/racialprofiling/15831prs20000927.html

  1. ^ Place Names of Illinois. p. 161. 
  2. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ACSSAFFFacts?_event=Search&geo_id=16000US1732018&_geoContext=01000US%7C04000US17%7C16000US1732018&_street=&_county=highland+park&_cityTown=highland+park&_state=04000US17&_zip=&_lang=en&_sse=on&ActiveGeoDiv=geoSelect&_useEV=&pctxt=fph&pgsl=160&_submenuId=factsheet_1&ds_name=ACS_2007_3YR_SAFF&_ci_nbr=null&qr_name=null&reg=null%3Anull&_keyword=&_industry=
  5. ^ Seth Shulman, The Telephone Gambit
  6. ^ http://www.cityhpil.com/government/comm/sistercities.htm

External links

42°10′57″N 87°48′25″W / 42.182525°N 87.807052°W / 42.182525; -87.807052

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