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Hilton Chicago
Hotel facts and statistics
Location 720 S. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois
Opening date 1927 (as the Stevens Hotel)
Architect E. M. Statler
Owner Hilton Hotels Corporation
No. of rooms 1,544
Number of suites 90
No. of floors 29
Parking 510 car capacity parking garage

The Hilton Chicago is a famous luxury hotel in Chicago, Illinois. The hotel is a Chicago landmark that overlooks Grant Park, Lake Michigan, and the Museum Campus. It is currently the third largest hotel in Chicago in terms of the number of guest rooms; however, it has the largest total meeting and event space of any Chicago hotel.[1]

History

The hotel originally opened as the Stevens Hotel, and at that time it was the largest hotel in the world.[2] The hotel was developed by the Stevens family of the Illinois Life Insurance Company and owners of the LaSalle. The Stevens Hotel opened in 1927, originally with 3,000 guest rooms. After World War II, Conrad Hilton purchased the hotel and named it for himself. The streets outside the Conrad Hilton Hotel were the scene of a battle between Mayor Richard J. Daley's police and antiwar demonstrators during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

Amenities

The Hilton Chicago is home to Chicago's largest and most expensive hotel room. The Conrad Hilton suite is a 5,000 square foot suite that encompasses two floors, has its own dedicated maid service, butler service, and elevator. A public lounge and promenade were created from panels and have furniture from the famed French Line ocean liner SS Normandie. The suite costs more than $7,000 per night. Famous guests who have stayed at the suite include Tony Blair, Alan Greenspan, Luciano Pavarotti, Ray Charles, Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, Cher, James Earl Jones, and John Travolta.[3]

References

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