The Full Wiki

His Holiness: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

His Holiness is the official style or manner of address in reference to the leaders of certain religious groups. In Christianity, specifically the Orthodox Church, the Coptic Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church (as well as the Eastern Catholic Churches), the style is used when respectively referring to the Pope of Alexandria and to the Pope of Rome. It is also used in reference to several other other Christian patriarchs.

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Dalai Lama is also addressed in the same manner in English, as are other Buddhist leaders such as Sakya Trizin, the Patriarch of Sakyapa.

Contents

Usage

In Christianity, the style derives from the Latin word sanctitas. It was originally used for all bishops but, from the 7th century, it was only used for popes, patriarchs and some secular rulers. From the 14th century its use was restricted to a small minority of the Christian patriarchs, notably the Pope of Alexandria, the Pope of Rome and the Patriarch of Moscow. In the Dawoodi Bohra sect of the Ismaili branch of Shia Islam, the title is held by Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin.

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Dalai Lama is commonly referred to in English by this style, even though he is technically not the leader of a religious group; it is, however, one of his prerogatives to appoint the Ganden Tripa (Tibetan dga' ldan khri pa), who is the nominal head of the Gelug (Tibetan dge lugs) school of Tibetan Buddhism, so the style in the case of the Dalai Lama may have some merit. Recently, the chief lamas of other of the spiritual traditions of Tibet, including the Sakya Trizin (head of the Sakya [Tibetan sa skya] school), the Karmapa (head of the Karma Kagyu [Tibetan kar ma bka' brgyud] school), and the Menri Trizin (head of Bon) have begun to be styled "His Holiness", as has the senior lama of the Nyingma (Tibetan rnying ma) school selected to be its principal representative, but this usage is more a manifestation of piety on the part of devotees than an appropriate application of the style.

The title is used officially in international diplomacy and in formal contexts without regard for its doctrinal, philosophical and theological origins.

In Christianity

Current Christian leaders who bear the title His Holiness.

In Buddhism

Current Buddhist leaders with the title His Holiness.

See also

Advertisements


His Holiness is the official style or manner of address in reference to the leaders of certain religious groups. In Christianity, specifically the Orthodox Church, the Coptic Orthodox Church, Armenian Orthodox Church, Syriac Orthodox Church, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church and the Roman Catholic Church (as well as the Eastern Catholic Churches), the style is used when respectively referring to the Pope of Alexandria and to the Pope of Rome. It is also used in reference to several other other Christian patriarchs and catholicos.

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Dalai Lama is also addressed in the same manner in English, as are other Buddhist leaders such as Sakya Trizin, the Patriarch of Sakyapa.

Contents

Usage

In Christianity, the style derives from the Latin word sanctitas. It was originally used for all bishops but, from the 7th century, it was only used for popes, patriarchs and some secular rulers. From the 14th century its use was restricted to a small minority of the Christian patriarchs, notably the Pope of Alexandria, the Pope of Rome and the Patriarch of Moscow. In the Dawoodi Bohra sect of the Ismaili branch of Shia Islam, the title is held by Syedna Mohammed Burhanuddin.

In Tibetan Buddhism, the Dalai Lama is commonly referred to in English by this style, even though he is technically not the leader of a religious group; it is, however, one of his prerogatives to appoint the Ganden Tripa (Tibetan dga' ldan khri pa), who is the nominal head of the Gelug (Tibetan dge lugs) school of Tibetan Buddhism, so the style in the case of the Dalai Lama may have some merit. Recently, the chief lamas of other of the spiritual traditions of Tibet, including the Sakya Trizin (head of the Sakya [Tibetan sa skya] school), the Karmapa (head of the Karma Kagyu [Tibetan kar ma bka' brgyud] school), and the Menri Trizin (head of Bon) have begun to be styled "His Holiness", as has the senior lama of the Nyingma (Tibetan rnying ma) school selected to be its principal representative, but this usage is more a manifestation of piety on the part of devotees than an appropriate application of the style.

The title is used officially in international diplomacy and in formal contexts without regard for its doctrinal, philosophical and theological origins.

In Christianity

Current Christian leaders who bear the title His Holiness.

In Buddhism

Current Buddhist leaders with the title His Holiness.

In Hinduism

Current Hindu leaders with the title His Holiness.

See also


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Noun

Singular
His Holiness

Plural
Their Holinesses

His Holiness (plural Their Holinesses)

  1. An honorific or title used to refer to a high-ranking religious leader.
    He had an audience with His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Simple English

His Holiness (short form "HH") is the official title to address (name) a leader of a religion. Catholics refer to the Pope using this style, while Buddhists use this when talking about the Tibetan Lamaist leader, the Dalai Lama.


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message