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Historic regions of the United States: Wikis

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Territorial expansion since 1803, by William R. Shepherd (1923)

This is a list of historic regions of the United States, defined as regions that were legal entities in the past.

Contents

Colonial era (before 1776)

The 13 colonies ceded their western claims to the federal government, allowing the creation of the first western territories (and later, states)
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The Thirteen Colonies

Colonial districts, other than the original thirteen

Colonies proposed, but unrealized or unrecognized

Regions ceded, annexed or purchased from states or foreign powers

Census Bureau map (circa 1974?) depicting territorial acquisitions and dates of statehood or of ratification of the Constitution.

Internal land grants, cessions, purchases, districts, claims or settlements

National Atlas map depicting United States territorial acquisitions.

The following are land grants, cessions, purchases, defined districts (official or otherwise) or named settlements made within an area that was already part of the original 13 colonies or a state of the Union or U.S. territory, including major land acquisitions (of varying degrees of legality) from Native Americans that did not involve international treaties or state cessions.

Iowa

Nebraska

New York

Ohio

Map of the Ohio Lands

Oklahoma

Map of Oklahoma and Indian Territories

Indian Reserves

Pennsylvania

Former organized territories

The following is a list of organized U.S. territories that have become states, in the order of the date organized.

Possessions and overseas territories subsequently retroceded

Independent states admitted to the union

Unrecognized or self-declared entities

Native American-related regions

  • Comancheria, the Oklahoma Panhandle during the late 1800s.
  • Dinétah, named for the Navajo Indian Reservation.
  • Lenapehoking, named for the Delaware or Lenilenape Indians.
  • Oklahoma as a separate Native American country, especially the Cherokee Nation and four of the Five Civilized Tribes.
  • Aztlan, the mythical land of the Aztecs located in the Southwestern U.S. in Mexican-American political activism.

Regional nicknames

Belts

See also

External links


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