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Historical provinces of Finland
(the borders of modern regions with pink colour)
Sweden/Finlands's provinces from 1658 to 1809.

The historical provinces (Finnish: historialliset maakunnat, singular historiallinen maakunta, Swedish: historiska landskap) of Finland is a legacy of the country's joint history with Sweden. The provinces ceased to be an administrative entity already in 1634 when they were superseded by the Counties, a reform which remained in force in Finland until 1997. The provinces remain as a tradition, but have no administrative function today. The spread of dialects of Finnish language approximately follow their borders.

First name in the parentheses is the Finnish name and the second is the Swedish.

Varsinais-Suomen.vaakuna.svg Finland Proper (Varsinais-Suomi, Egentliga Finland)
Karjalan historiallisen maakunnan vaakuna.svg Karelia (Karjala, Karelen)
Lapin maakunnan vaakuna.svg Laponia (Lappi, Lappland)
Ostrobothnia coat of arms.svg Ostrobothnia (Pohjanmaa, Österbotten)
Satakunta.vaakuna.svg Satakunta (Satakunta, Satakunda)
Savo.vaakuna.svg Savonia (Savo, Savolax)
Häme.vaakuna.svg Tavastia (Häme, Tavastland)
Uudenmaan historiallisen maakunnan vaakuna.svg Uusimaa (Uusimaa, Nyland)
Aland coat of arms.svg Åland (Ahvenanmaa, Åland)

Heraldry

At the funeral of King Gustav Vasa in 1560 the coats of arms for the provinces were displayed together for the first time and several of them had been granted for that particular occasion. After the separation of Finland from Sweden in 1809 the traditions for the provincial arms has somewhat diverged. Finland maintains the distinction between Ducal and Countal dignity shown in the coronets for arms of the historical provinces while all the Swedish provinces carry the Swedish style Dukal coronet since 1884. The division of Lapland also necessitated a distinction between the Finnish and the Swedish coats arms.

During the reign of king Karl IX there was emigration from Savonia to the western parts of Sweden and eastern Norway, to the Finnskogen or "Finnish forest." The ancient Savonian dialect was preserved in these areas until the last speakers died in the 1960s.

The coats of arms of the historical provinces have served as a basis for the arms of newer administrative divisions.

See also

External links

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Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

File:Historical provinces in Finland with coats of arms.png
Historical provinces of Finland
(the borders of modern regions with pink colour)
File:Svpmap blank.png
Sweden/Finland's provinces from 1658 to 1809.

The historical provinces (Template:Lang-fi, singular historiallinen maakunta, Swedish: historiska landskap) of Finland are a legacy of the country's joint history with Sweden. The provinces ceased to be an administrative entity as early as 1634 when they were superseded by the Counties, a reform which remained in force in Finland until 1997. The provinces remain as a tradition, but have no administrative function today. The spread of dialects of Finnish language approximately follows their borders.

First name in the parentheses is the Finnish name and the second is the Swedish.

File:Coat of arms of historical province of Finland Proper in Finland.png Finland Proper (Varsinais-Suomi, Egentliga Finland)
File:Coat of arms of historical province of Karelia in Finland.png Karelia (Karjala, Karelen)
File:Coat of arms of historical province of Laponia in Finland.png Laponia (Lappi, Lappland)
File:Coat of arms of historical province of Ostrobothnia in Finland.png Ostrobothnia (Pohjanmaa, Österbotten)
File:Coat of arms of historical province of Satakunta in Finland.png Satakunta (Satakunta, Satakunda)
File:Coat of arms of historical province of Savonia in Finland.png Savonia (Savo, Savolax)
File:Häme.vaakuna.svg Tavastia (Häme, Tavastland)
File:Coat of arms of historical province of Uusimaa in Finland.png Uusimaa (Uusimaa, Nyland)
File:Aland coat of arms.svg Åland (Ahvenanmaa, Åland)

Heraldry

At the funeral of King Gustav Vasa in 1560 the coats of arms for the provinces were displayed together for the first time and several of them had been granted for that particular occasion. After the separation of Finland from Sweden in 1809 the traditions for the provincial arms has somewhat diverged. Finland maintains the distinction between Ducal and Countal dignity shown in the coronets for arms of the historical provinces while all the Swedish provinces carry the Swedish style Dukal coronet since 1884. The division of Lapland also necessitated a distinction between the Finnish and the Swedish coats arms.

During the reign of king Karl IX there was emigration from Savonia to the western parts of Sweden and eastern Norway, to the Finnskogen or "Finnish forest." The ancient Savonian dialect was preserved in these areas until the last speakers died in the 1960s.

The coats of arms of the historical provinces have served as a basis for the arms of newer administrative divisions.

See also

  • Lists of unofficial regions by country
  • Historical provinces of Sweden and Finland
  • Österland
  • Norrland
  • Provinces of Finland
  • Regions of Finland

External links

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Historical provinces of Finland. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Historical provinces of FinlandRDF feed
Wikipedia Historical provinces of Finland  +

This article uses material from the "Historical provinces of Finland" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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