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The history of the Jews in Indonesia commences with the arrival of early European explorers and settlers. Jews in Indonesia presently form a very small Jewish community of about 20 Jews,[1] of mostly Sephardi Jews.

Contents

History

In the 1850s, Jewish traveller Jacob Saphir was the first to write about the Jewish community in the Dutch East Indies, after visiting Batavia. In Batavia, he had spoken with a local Jew, who had told him of about 20 Jewish families in the city; and several more in Surabaya and Semarang. Most of the Jews living in the Dutch East Indies in the 19th century were Dutch Jews, who worked as merchants or were affiliated with the colonial regime. However, some members of the Jewish community were immigrants from Iraq or Aden.

Between the two World Wars, the number of Jews in the Dutch East Indies was estimated at 2,000 by Israel Cohen. Indonesian Jews suffered greatly under the Japanese Occupation of Indonesia and were interned and forced to work in labor camps. After the war, the released Jews found themselves without their previous property, and many emigrated to the United States, Australia or Israel.

By the late 1960s, it had been estimated that there were 20 Jews living in Jakarta, 25 more living in Surabaya and others living in Manado.

Population

The total Jewish population of Indonesia according to the World Jewish Congress [2] is estimated at 20.

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Assimilation and population changes

The same social and cultural characteristics of Indonesia that facilitated the extraordinary economic, political, and social success of the Indonesian Jewish community also contributed to assimilation.

Intermarriage rates rose from roughly 55% in 1944 to approximately 90%-99% in 2004. Intermarried couples raise their children with a local religious upbringing. However, it is much more common for intermarried families to raise their children as just culturally Indonesian.

For identity, the government issues ID cards called KTP (Kartu Tanda Penduduk). Every citizen over the age of 17 must carry a KTP. Listed on the identity card is the holder's religion. Indonesia only recognizes five religions: Islam, Christianity/Catholicism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism. Judaism and other religions are not recognized by the Indonesian government.

See also

External links

References


The history of the Jews in Indonesia commences with the arrival of early European explorers and settlers. Jews in Indonesia presently form a very small Jewish community of about 20 Jews,[1] of mostly Sephardi Jews.

Contents

History

In the 1850s, Jewish traveller Jacob Saphir was the first to write about the Jewish community in the Dutch East Indies, after visiting Batavia. In Batavia, he had spoken with a local Jew, who had told him of about 20 Jewish families in the city; and several more in Surabaya and Semarang. Most of the Jews living in the Dutch East Indies in the 19th century were Dutch Jews, who worked as merchants or were affiliated with the colonial regime. However, some members of the Jewish community were immigrants from Iraq or Aden.

Between the two World Wars, the number of Jews in the Dutch East Indies was estimated at 2,000 by Israel Cohen. Indonesian Jews suffered greatly under the Japanese Occupation of Indonesia and were interned and forced to work in labor camps. After the war, the released Jews found themselves without their previous property, and many emigrated to the United States, Australia or Israel.

By the late 1960s, it had been estimated that there were 20 Jews living in Jakarta, 25 more living in Surabaya and others living in Manado.

Population

The total Jewish population of Indonesia according to the World Jewish Congress [2] is estimated at 20.

Assimilation and population changes

The same social and cultural characteristics of Indonesia that facilitated the extraordinary economic, political, and social success of the Indonesian Jewish community also contributed to assimilation.

Intermarriage rates rose from roughly 55% in 1944 to approximately 90%-99% in 2004. Intermarried couples raise their children with a local religious upbringing. However, it is much more common for intermarried families to raise their children as just culturally Indonesian.

For identity, the government issues ID cards called KTP (Kartu Tanda Penduduk). Every citizen over the age of 17 must carry a KTP. Listed on the identity card is the holder's religion. Indonesia only recognizes six religions: Islam, Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, Buddhism, Hinduism and Confucianism. Judaism and other religions are not recognized by the Indonesian government.

See also

External links

References


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