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Hohenzollern-Hechingen
State of the Holy Roman Empire (until 1806)
County of Zollern
1576–1850

Flag

Motto
Latin: Nihil Sine Deo
(English: Nothing without God)
Hohenzollern-Hechingen in 1848
Capital Hechingen
Language(s) German
Religion Roman Catholic
Government Principality
Historical era Middle Ages
 - Partition of County of
    Hohenzollern
 
1576 1576
 - Raised to Principality 1623
 - Incorporation into
    Kingdom of Prussia
 
1850 1850

Hohenzollern-Hechingen was a county and principality in southwestern Germany. Its rulers belonged to a branch of the senior Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern dynasty.

Contents

History

The County of Hohenzollern-Hechingen was created in 1576, upon the partition of the County of Hohenzollern, a fief of the Holy Roman Empire. When the last count of Hohenzollern, Charles I of Hohenzollern (1512-1579) died, the territory was to be divided up between his three sons:

Unlike the Hohenzollerns of Brandenburg and Prussia, the Hohenzollerns of southwest Germany remained Roman Catholic. The County was raised to a principality in 1623.

The principality joined the Confederation of the Rhine in 1806 and was a member state of the German Confederation between 1815 and 1850. The democratic Revolution of 1848 was relatively successful in Hohenzollern, and on 16 May 1848, the Prince was forced to accept the establishment of a constitution. However, the conflict between monarch and democrats continued, and on August 6, Hohenzollern was occupied by Prussian forces. On December 7, 1849, Prince Friedrich Wilhelm Konstantin sold the country to his relative, King Frederick William IV of Prussia. On 12 March 1850, Hohenzollern-Hechingen officially became part of Prussia, and formed together with Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen the Hohenzollernsche Lande.

Rulers

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Counts of Hohenzollern-Hechingen (1576-1623)

  • Eitel Friedrich IV (1576-1605)
  • Johann Georg (1605-1623) became Prince in 1623

Princes of Hohenzollern-Hechingen (1623-1850)


Simple English

Hohenzollern-Hechingen

Vassal of Holy Roman Empire

1576 – 1850
File:Flag of Hohenzollern-Hechingen and File:Fürstenwappen Hohenzollern
Flag Coat of arms
Motto: Latin: Nihil Sine Deo
(English: Nothing without God)
Capital Hechingen
48°21′N 8°58′E
Language(s) German
Religion Roman Catholic
Government Principality
Historical era Middle Ages
 - Partition of County of
    Hohenzollern
 
1576
 - Raised to Principality 1623
 - Incorporation into
    Kingdom of Prussia
 
1850

Hohenzollern-Hechingen was a county and principality in southwestern Germany, part of what is now Baden-Württemberg. Its rulers were members of a branch of the senior Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern family.

Contents

History

The County of Hohenzollern-Hechingen was created in 1576, when the County of Hohenzollern was divided. The county was ruled as a part of the Holy Roman Empire. When the last count of Hohenzollern, Charles I of Hohenzollern (1512–1579) died, the territory was to be divided up between his three sons:

  • Eitel Frederick IV of Hohenzollern-Hechingen (1545–1605)
  • Charles II of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1547–1606)
  • Christoph of Hohenzollern-Haigerloch (1552–1592)

Unlike the Hohenzollerns of Brandenburg and Prussia, the Hohenzollerns of southwest Germany remained Roman Catholic. The County was raised to a principality in 1623.

The principality joined the Confederation of the Rhine in 1806 and was a member state of the German Confederation between 1815 and 1850. The democratic Revolution of 1848 was relatively successful in Hohenzollern, and on 16 May 1848, the Prince was forced to accept the constitution limiting his power. However, the conflict between monarch and democrats continued, and on August 6, Hohenzollern was occupied by Prussian forces. On December 7, 1849, Prince Friedrich Wilhelm Konstantin sold the country to his relative, King Frederick William IV of Prussia. On 12 March 1850, Hohenzollern-Hechingen officially became part of Prussia. Hohenzollern-Hechingen and Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, which also became part of Prussia in 1850, were called the Hohenzollernsche Lande English: Hohenzollern Lands.

Rulers

Counts of Hohenzollern-Hechingen (1576-1623)

  • Eitel Friedrich IV (1576–1605)
  • Johann Georg (1605–1623) became Prince in 1623

Princes of Hohenzollern-Hechingen (1623-1850)

  • Eitel Friedrich V. (1623–1661)
  • Philipp Christoph Friedrich (1661–1671)
  • Friedrich Wilhelm (1671–1735)
  • Friedrich Ludwig (1735–1750)
  • Josef Friedrich Wilhelm (1750–1798)
  • Hermann (1798–1810)
  • Friedrich (1810–1838)
  • Konstantin (1838–1850) died 1869 last male member in dynastic line


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