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Holdridge life zone classification scheme. Although conceived as three-dimensional by its originator, is usually shown as a two-dimensional array of hexagons in a triangular frame.

The Holdridge life zones system is a global bioclimatic scheme for the classification of land areas. It was first published by Leslie Holdridge in 1947, and updated in 1967. It is a relatively simple system based on few empirical data, giving objective mapping criteria.[1] A basic assumption of the system is that both soil and climax vegetation can be mapped once climate is known.[2]

While it was first designed for tropical and subtropical area, the system applies globally. The system has been shown to fit tropical vegetation zones, Mediterranean zones, and boreal zones, but is less applicable to cold oceanic or cold arid climates where moisture becomes the determining factor. The system has found a major use in assessing the possible changes in natural vegetation patterns due to global warming.[3]

The indicators incorporated into the system are:

  • mean annual biotemperature (logarithmic)
  • annual precipitation (logarithmic)
  • ratio of annual potential evapotranspiration (PET) to mean total annual precipitation.

Biotemperature is based on the growing season length and temperature. It is measured as the mean of refers to all temperatures above freezing, with all temperatures below freezing adjusted to 0 °C, as plants are dormant at these temperatures. Holdridge's system uses biotemperature first, rather than the temperate latitude bias of Merriam's life zones, and does not primarily consider elevation. The system is considered more appropriate to the complexities of tropical vegetation than Merriam's system.

Classes

The classes defined within the system, as used by IIASA, are:

  1. Polar desert
  2. Subpolar dry tundra
  3. Subpolar moist tundra
  4. Subpolar wet tundra
  5. Subpolar rain tundra
  6. Boreal desert
  7. Boreal dry scrub
  8. Boreal moist forest
  9. Boreal wet forest
  10. Boreal rain forest
  11. Cool temperate desert
  12. Cool temperate desert scrub
  13. Cool temperate steppe
  14. Cool temperate moist forest
  15. Cool temperate wet forest
  16. Cool temperate rain forest
  17. Warm temperate desert
  18. Warm temperate desert scrub
  19. Warm temperate thorn scrub
  20. Warm temperate dry forest
  21. Warm temperate moist forest
  22. Warm temperate wet forest
  23. Warm temperate rain forest
  24. Subtropical desert
  25. Subtropical desert scrub
  26. Subtropical thorn woodland
  27. Subtropical dry forest
  28. Subtropical moist forest
  29. Subtropical wet forest
  30. Subtropical rain forest
  31. Tropical desert
  32. Tropical desert scrub
  33. Tropical thorn woodland
  34. Tropical very dry forest
  35. Tropical dry forest
  36. Tropical moist forest
  37. Tropical wet forest
  38. Tropical rain forest

See also

References

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The Holdridge life zones system is a global bioclimatic scheme for the classification of land areas. It was first published by Leslie Holdridge in 1947, and updated in 1967. It is a relatively simple system based on few empirical data, giving objective mapping criteria.[1] A basic assumption of the system is that both soil and climax vegetation can be mapped once climate is known.[2]

While it was first designed for tropical and subtropical area, the system applies globally. The system has been shown to fit tropical vegetation zones, Mediterranean zones, and boreal zones, but is less applicable to cold oceanic or cold arid climates where moisture becomes the determining factor. The system has found a major use in assessing the possible changes in natural vegetation patterns due to global warming.[3]

The three axis of the Barycentric subdivisions are:

Further indicators incorporated into the system are:

Biotemperature is based on the growing season length and temperature. It is measured as the mean of refers to all temperatures above freezing, with all temperatures below freezing adjusted to 0 °C, as plants are dormant at these temperatures. Holdridge's system uses biotemperature first, rather than the temperate latitude bias of Merriam's life zones, and does not primarily consider elevation. The system is considered more appropriate to the complexities of tropical vegetation than Merriam's system.

Classes

The classes defined within the system, as used by IIASA, are:

  1. Polar desert
  2. Subpolar dry tundra
  3. Subpolar moist tundra
  4. Subpolar wet tundra
  5. Subpolar rain tundra
  6. Boreal desert
  7. Boreal dry scrub
  8. Boreal moist forest
  9. Boreal wet forest
  10. Boreal rain forest
  11. Cool temperate desert
  12. Cool temperate desert scrub
  13. Cool temperate steppe
  14. Cool temperate moist forest
  15. Cool temperate wet forest
  16. Cool temperate rain forest
  17. Warm temperate desert
  18. Warm temperate desert scrub
  19. Warm temperate thorn scrub
  20. Warm temperate dry forest
  21. Warm temperate moist forest
  22. Warm temperate wet forest
  23. Warm temperate rain forest
  24. Subtropical desert
  25. Subtropical desert scrub
  26. Subtropical thorn woodland
  27. Subtropical dry forest
  28. Subtropical moist forest
  29. Subtropical wet forest
  30. Subtropical rain forest
  31. Tropical desert
  32. Tropical desert scrub
  33. Tropical thorn woodland
  34. Tropical very dry forest
  35. Tropical dry forest
  36. Tropical moist forest
  37. Tropical wet forest
  38. Tropical rain forest

See also

References


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