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Today's Hollywood Sign.

Hollywood is a district in Los Angeles, situated west-northwest of Downtown Los Angeles.[1] Due to its fame and cultural identity as the historical center of movie studios and movie stars, the word "Hollywood" is often used as a metonymy of American cinema, and is often interchangably used to refer to the greater Los Angeles area in general. The nickname Tinseltown refers to Hollywood and the movie industry.[2] Today, much of the movie industry has dispersed into surrounding areas such as the Westside neighborhood,[3] but significant auxiliary industries, such as editing, effects, props, post-production and lighting companies remain in Hollywood, as does the backlot of Paramount Pictures.

Many historic Hollywood theaters are used as venues and concert stages to premiere major theatrical releases and host the Academy Awards. It is a popular destination for nightlife, tourism, and is home to the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Although it is not the typical practice of the city of Los Angeles to establish specific boundaries for districts or neighborhoods, Hollywood is a recent exception. On February 16, 2005, California Assembly Members Goldberg and Koretz introduced a bill to require California to keep specific records on Hollywood as though it were independent. For this to be done, the boundaries were defined. This bill was unanimously supported by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce and the Los Angeles City Council. Assembly Bill 588 was approved by the Governor of California on August 28, 2006, and now the district of Hollywood has official borders. The border can be loosely described as the area east of Beverly Hills and West Hollywood, south of Mulholland Drive, Laurel Canyon, Cahuenga Boulevard, and Barham Boulevard, and the cities of Burbank and Glendale, north of Melrose Avenue and west of the Golden State Freeway and Hyperion Avenue. This includes all of Griffith Park and Los Feliz—two areas that were hitherto generally considered separate from Hollywood by most Angelenos. The population of the district, including Los Feliz, as of the 2000 census was 123,436 and the median household income was $33,409 in 1999.[4]

As a portion of the city of Los Angeles, Hollywood does not have its own municipal government, but does have an official, appointed by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, who serves as an honorary "Mayor of Hollywood" for ceremonial purposes only. Johnny Grant held this position for decades, until his death on January 9, 2008.[5][6]

Contents

History

In 1853, one adobe hut stood in Nopalera, named for the Mexican Nopal cactus indiginous to the area. By 1870, an agricultural community flourished in the area with thriving crops of many common and exotic varieties. The area was known to these residents as the Cahuenga Valley, after the pass in the Santa Monica Mountains immediately to the north. Soon thereafter, land speculation would lead to subdivision of the large plots and an influx of homeowners.

In spite of the area's short history, it has been filled with events driven by optimistic progress. As such, the recording of history has not been something of value to the community until recent years. Indeed, even the origin of name of Hollywood itself has been nearly lost to most locals, leaving them to speculate on its origins. One such etymology is that the name "Hollywood" traces to the ample stands of native Toyon or "California Holly", that cover the hillsides with clusters of bright red berries each winter. Another factor leading to confusion has been that two factions have claimed credit for naming Hollywood. Based upon published papers and other documents, it now seems that the name Hollywood was coined by H. J. Whitley,[7] the Father of Hollywood[8]. He came up with the name while honeymooning with his wife, Gigi, in 1886, according to Margaret Virginia Whitley's memoir. Whitley arranged to buy the 500 acre E.C. Hurd ranch and disclosed to him his plans for the land. They agreed on a price and Hurd agreed to sell at a later date. Before Whitley got off the ground with Hollywood, plans for the new town had spread to General Harrison Gray Otis, Mr Hurd's wife, Whitley's wife Gigi, Mrs. Daeida Wilcox, and numerous others through the mill of gossip and land speculation.

Daeida Wilcox learned the plans for the fledgling Hollywood from Gigi Whitley as they coincidentally travelled on the same train from Los Angeles to the upper Midwest. Daeida recommended the same name to her husband, H. H. Wilcox. The couple laid out and subdivided his 160 acre farm which bordered the east side of Whitley's land. On February 1, 1887, Harvey filed a deed and map of property he sold with the Los Angeles County Recorder's office. It is also speculated that Harvey Wilcox would have learned of the name Hollywood from his neighbor in Holly Canyon (now Lake Hollywood), Ivar Weid, a prominent investor and friend of Whitley's. Harvey wanted to be the first to record it on a deed, and did so on his official map. The early real-estate boom busted that same year, yet Hollywood began to grow, slowly.

By 1900, the region had a post office, newspaper, hotel and two markets, along with a population of 500. Los Angeles, with a population of 100,000 people at the time, lay 10 miles (16 km) east through the vineyards, barley fields, and citrus groves. A single-track streetcar line ran down the middle of Prospect Avenue from it, but service was infrequent and the trip took two hours. The old citrus fruit packing house would be converted into a livery stable, improving transportation for the inhabitants of Hollywood.

Glen-Holly Hotel, first hotel in Hollywood, at the corner of what is now Yucca Street. It was built by Joakim Berg, a famous artist back in the 1890s.
Hollywood Hotel 1905.
The intersection of Hollywood and Highland 1907.

Construction of the famous Hollywood Hotel, the first major hotel in Hollywood, was opened in 1902, by H. J. Whitley, by then President of the Los Pacific Boulevard and Development Company of which he was a major shareholder. Having finally acquired the Hurd ranch and subdivided it, Whitley had built the hotel to attract land buyers, and was eager to sell these residential lots among the lemon ranches lining the foothills. Flanking the west side of Highland Avenue, the structure fronted on Prospect Avenue. Still a dusty, unpaved road, it was regularly graded and graveled. His company was developing and selling one of the early residential areas, the Ocean View Tract.

Whitley did much to promote the area, including bringing electricity and building a bank, as well as a road into the Cahuenga Pass-- gateway to the San Fernando Valley. Whitley's land was centered on Highland Avenue. Harvey Wilcox had died in 1891, and Daeida remarried a man named P.J. Beveridge in 1893. Their land was centered on Cahuenga Boulevard, which also accesses the Cahuenga Pass by the historid Old Pass Road, part of California's El Camino Real. Each tried attract the town center of Hollywood around their respective streets' intersections with Prospect Ave. The result of this rivalry remains evident to this day, as Hollywood appears to have two centers with a lesser-developed section of Hollywood Blvd between them. Today's Metro Red Line subway has a station in each of these centers: Hollywood/Vine for the Wilcox', and Hollywood/Highland for the Whitley's; separated by a walkable 3/4 of a mile. A result of this rivalry has been that, along with dual-town centers, each faction seemed to write its own history of the founding of Hollywood in their bid for legitimacy. It has become necessary to refer to multiple sources from both sides to derrive the true (or truer) story of Hollywood's proto-Tinsel Town history.

Hollywood was finally incorporated as a municipality in 1903. As Daeida Wilcox-Beveridge was an ardent prohibitionist, among the town ordinances was one prohibiting the sale of liquor except by pharmacists. Another that demonstrates the vast difference between today's and early Hollywood was a law outlawing the driving of cattle through the streets in herds of more than two hundred. In 1904, a new trolley car track running from Los Angeles to Hollywood up Prospect Avenue was opened. The system was called "the Hollywood Boulevard." It cut travel time to and from Los Angeles drastically.

By 1910, because of an ongoing struggle to secure an adequate water supply, the townsmen voted for Hollywood to be annexed into the City of Los Angeles, as the water system of the growing city had opened the Los Angeles Aqueduct and was piping water down from the Owens River in the Owens Valley. Another reason for the vote was that Hollywood could have access to drainage through Los Angeles´ sewer system. With annexation, the name of Prospect Avenue was changed to Hollywood Boulevard and all the street numbers in the new district changed. For example, 100 Prospect Avenue, at Vermont Avenue, became 6400 Hollywood Boulevard; and 100 Cahuenga Boulevard, at Hollywood Boulevard, changed to 1700 Cahuenga Boulevard.

Motion picture industry

Nestor Studio, Hollywood's first movie studio, 1913.

Filmmaking in the greater Los Angeles area preceded the establishment of filmmaking in Hollywood. The Biograph Company filmed the short film A Daring Hold-Up in Southern California in Los Angeles in 1906.[9] The first studio in the Los Angeles area was established by the Selig Polyscope Company in Edendale, with construction beginning in August 1909.[10]

The first motion picture to be filmed in Hollywood was taken on October 26, 1911. Although the movie never really had a name, it was a true piece of Hollywood’s history. The Whitley home was used as its set. The movie was filmed in the middle of their groves on the corner of Whitley Ave and Hollywood Boulevard. The motion picture was directed by David and William Horsley and Al Christe.

The first studio in Hollywood was established by the New Jersey–based Centaur Co., which wanted to make westerns in California. They rented an unused roadhouse at 6121 Sunset Boulevard at the corner of Gower, and converted it into a movie studio in October 1911, calling it Nestor Studio after the name of the western branch of their company.[11] The first feature film made specifically in a Hollywood studio, in 1914, was The Squaw Man, directed by Cecil B. DeMille and Oscar Apfel,[12] and was filmed at the Lasky-DeMille Barn amongst other area locations.

By 1911, Los Angeles was second only to New York in motion picture production,[13] and by 1915, the majority of American films were being produced in the Los Angeles area.[14]

Hollywood movie studios, 1922.

Four major film companies — Paramount, Warner Bros., RKO and Columbia — had studios in Hollywood, as did several minor companies and rental studios. Hollywood had begun its dramatic transformation from sleepy suburb to movie production capital. The residential and agrarian Hollywood Boulevard of 1910 was virtually unrecognizable by 1920 as the new commercial and retail sector replaced it. The sleepy town was no more, and to the chagrin of many original residents, the boom town could not be stopped.

1920s-1940s

By 1920, Hollywood had become world famous as the center of the United States film industry.

From the 1920s to the 1940s, a large percentage of transportation to and from Hollywood was by means of the red cars of the Pacific Electric Railway.

Modern Hollywood

On January 22, 1947, the first commercial television station west of the Mississippi River, KTLA, began operating in Hollywood. In December of that year, The Public Prosecutor became the first network television series to be filmed in Hollywood. And in the 1950s, music recording studios and offices began moving into Hollywood. Other businesses, however, continued to migrate to different parts of the Los Angeles area, primarily to Burbank. Much of the movie industry remained in Hollywood, although the district's outward appearance changed.

In 1952, CBS built CBS Television City on the corner of Fairfax Avenue and Beverly Boulevard, on the former site of Gilmore Stadium. CBS's expansion into the Fairfax District pushed the unofficial boundary of Hollywood further south than it had been. CBS's slogan for the shows taped there was "From Television City in Hollywood..."

During the early 1950s the famous Hollywood Freeway was constructed from Four Level Interchange interchange in downtown Los Angeles, past the Hollywood Bowl, up through Cahuenga Pass and into the San Fernando Valley. In the early days, streetcars ran up through the pass, on rails running along the central median.

The famous Capitol Records Building on Vine St. just north of Hollywood Boulevard was built in 1956. The building houses offices and recording studios which are not open to the public, but its circular design looks like a stack of 7-inch (180 mm) vinyl records.

The now derelict lot at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Serrano Avenue was once the site of the illustrious Hollywood Professional School, whose alumni reads like a Hollywood Who's Who of household "names". Many of these former child stars attended a "farewell" party at the commemorative sealing of a time capsule buried on the lot.

The Hollywood Walk of Fame was created in 1958 as a tribute to artists working in the entertainment industry and the first embedded star on the walk—honoring actress Joanne Woodward -- was set in place on February 9, 1960. Honorees receive a star based on career and lifetime achievements in motion pictures, live theatre, radio, television, and/or music, as well as their charitable and civic contributions.

In 1985, the Hollywood Boulevard Commercial and Entertainment District was officially listed in the National Register of Historic Places protecting important buildings and ensuring that the significance of Hollywood's past would always be a part of its future.

In June 1999, the long-awaited Hollywood extension of the Los Angeles County Metro Rail Red Line subway opened, running from Downtown Los Angeles to the Valley, with stops along Hollywood Boulevard at Western Avenue, Vine Street and Highland Avenue.

The Kodak Theatre, which opened in 2001 on Hollywood Boulevard at Highland Avenue, where the historic Hollywood Hotel once stood, has become the new home of the Oscars.

While motion picture production still occurs within the Hollywood district, most major studios are actually located elsewhere in the Los Angeles region. Paramount Pictures is the only major studio still physically located within Hollywood. Other studios in the district include the aforementioned Jim Henson (formerly Chaplin) Studios, Sunset Gower Studios, and Raleigh Studios.

While Hollywood and the adjacent neighborhood of Los Feliz served as the initial homes for all of the early television stations in the Los Angeles market, most have now relocated to other locations within the metropolitan area. KNBC began this exodus in 1962, when it moved from the former NBC Radio City Studios located at the northeast corner of Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street to NBC Studios in Burbank. KTTV pulled up stakes in 1996 from its former home at Metromedia Square in the 5700 block of Sunset Boulevard to relocate to Bundy Drive in West Los Angeles. KABC-TV moved from its original location at ABC Television Center (now branded The Prospect Studios) just east of Hollywood to Glendale in 2000, though the Los Angeles bureau of ABC News still resides at Prospect. After being purchased by 20th Century Fox in 2001, KCOP left its former home in the 900 block of North La Brea Avenue to join KTTV on the Fox lot. The CBS Corporation-owned duopoly of KCBS-TV and KCAL-TV moved from its longtime home at CBS Columbia Square in the 6100 block of Sunset Boulevard to a new facility at CBS Studio Center in Studio City. KTLA, located in the 5800 block of Sunset Boulevard, and KCET, in the 4400 block of Sunset Boulevard, are the last broadcasters (television or radio) with Hollywood addresses.

Additionally, Hollywood once served as the home of nearly every radio station in Los Angeles, all of which have now moved into other communities. KNX was the last station to broadcast from Hollywood, when it left CBS Columbia Square for a studio in the Miracle Mile in 2005.

In 2002, a number of Hollywood citizens began a campaign for the district to secede from Los Angeles and become, as it had been a century earlier, its own incorporated municipality. Secession supporters argued that the needs of their community were being ignored by the leaders of Los Angeles. In June of that year, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors placed secession referendums for both Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley on the ballots for a "citywide election." To pass, they required the approval of a majority of voters in the proposed new municipality as well as a majority of voters in all of Los Angeles. In the November election, both referendums failed by wide margins in the citywide vote.

Hollywood is served by several neighborhood councils, including the Hollywood United Neighborhood Council (HUNC) [2] and the Hollywood Studio District Neighborhood Council. [3] These two groups are part of the network of neighborhood councils certified by the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment, or DONE. [4] Neighborhood Councils cast advisory votes on such issues as zoning, planning, and other community issues. The council members are voted in by stakeholders, generally defined as anyone living, working, owning property, or belonging to an organization within the boundaries of the council. [5]

Revitalization

After many years of serious decline, when many Hollywood landmarks were threatened with demolition,[15] Hollywood is now undergoing rapid gentrification and revitalization with the goal of urban density in mind. Many developments have been completed, typically centered on Hollywood Boulevard. The Hollywood and Highland complex (site of the Kodak Theater), has been a major catalyst for the redevelopment of the area. In addition, numerous fashionable bars, clubs, and retail businesses have opened on or surrounding the boulevard, returning Hollywood to a center of nightlife in Los Angeles. Many older buildings have also been converted to lofts and condominiums, Cosmo Lofts was the first live/work loft development in the Hollywood area. The W Hollywood Hotel is now open at the intersection of Hollywood and Vine.

Hollywood neighborhoods and communities

The Hotel Roosevelt has long sat on Hollywood Boulevard near Hollywood High School and Grauman's Chinese Theater.

Government

Local government

Much of the neighborhood of Hollywood that includes most of Hollywood Boulevard and Sunset Boulevard falls within the 13th District of the City of Los Angeles. Recent city council members include:

Michael Woo: 1985–1993

Jackie Goldberg: 1994–2000

Eric Garcetti: 2000–present

The city agency that spearheads revitalization within the Hollywood Redevelopment Project Area is the Community Redevelopment of Los Angeles located in the House of Blues Building at 6244 Sunset Blvd., #2206, Hollywood, CA 90028.[citation needed]

County representation

The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services operates the Hollywood-Wilshire Health Center in Hollywood.[16]

Federal representation

The United States Postal Service operates the Hollywood Post Office,[17] the Hollywood Pavilion Post Office,[18] and the Sunset Post Office.[19]

Demographics

As of the 2000 census, there were 210,777 people residing in the Community Plan Area of Hollywood. The population density was 8,443 people per square mile (3,261/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 59.84% White (47.27% White Non-Hispanic), 9.44% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 4.28% African American, 0.62% Native American, 19.10% from other races, and 6.59% from two or more races. 34.51% of the population were Hispanic of any race. 49.63% of the population was foreign born; of this, 46.24% came from Latin America, 32.73% from Asia, 17.80% from Europe and 3.23% from other parts of the world.[20]

Education

Students who live in Hollywood are zoned to schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The area is within Board District 4.[21] As of 2008 Marlene Canter represents the district.[22] Canter announced that she will not seek re-election after her term expires in June 2009.[23]

Elementary schools:

Middle schools:

Hollywood High School and Helen Bernstein High School are public high schools in the Hollywood area.

Christ the King Elementary School is a private school in the area.

For many years, the motion picture Industry had its own private Industry-run institution for child actors, the Hollywood Professional School.

Public libraries

The Will and Ariel Durant Branch and the Frances Howard Goldwyn – Hollywood Regional Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library are in Hollywood.

Landmarks

The Hollywood Bowl, on opening night in 2005.
The Ripley's Believe It or Not! Odditorium.

Special events

  • The Academy Awards are held in late February/early March (since 2004) of each year, honoring the preceding year in film. Prior to 2004, they were held in late March/early April. Since 2002, the Oscars have been held at their new home at the Kodak Theater at Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue.
  • CINECON Classic Film Festival & Exposition (Annual timing is five days—connected to Labor Day weekend) Classic film memorabilia, expert presentations, author signings, and movie screenings with celebrity guests.
  • The annual Hollywood Christmas Parade: The 2006 parade on Nov 26th, was the 75th edition of the Christmas Parade. The parade goes down Hollywood Boulevard and is broadcast in the LA area on KTLA, and around the United States on Tribune-owned stations and the WGN superstation. [6]

See also

Hollywood history books

  • Gaelyn Whitley Keith (2006) The Father of Hollywood: The True Story (Hardcover), Book Surge, An Amazon.com Company. (ISBN 1-4196-4194-8)
  • Nudelman, Robert & Wanamaker, Marc (2005) Historic Hollywood: An Illustrated History (Hardcover), Texas: Historical Pub Network. (ISBN 978-1893619463)
  • R. Jezek, George & Wanamaker, Marc (2003) Hollywood: Now and Then (Hardcover), California: George Ross Jezek Photography & Publishing. (ISBN 978-0970103611)
  • Gregory Paul Williams (2005) The Story of Hollywood: An Illustrated History (Hardcover), BL Press LLC. (ISBN 0-9776299-0-2)

References

Notes

  1. ^ City of Los Angeles Map - Larger View
  2. ^ "Online Etymology Dictionary". Etymonline.com. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=tinsel&searchmode=none. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ "LA Almanac". http://www.laalmanac.com/LA/la00c25.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  5. ^ Scott (2005).
  6. ^ "Johnny Grant, honorary Hollywood mayor, dies". CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/TV/01/10/grant.obit. Retrieved 2008-01-12. 
  7. ^ Keith (2006).
  8. ^ ^ "Death Calls H.J. Whitley. Real Estate Man Known as "Father of Hollywood". Pioneer in Many Southland Developments.". Los Angeles Times. http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/access/384306361.html?dids=384306361:384306361&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&date=Jun+04%2C+1931&author=&pub=Los+Angeles+Times&desc=DEATH+CALLS+H.+J.+WHITLEY&pqatl=google. Retrieved 2008-07-17. "H. J. Whitley, pioneer California real estate man and known as the "Father of Hollywood." died yesterday at the age of 83 years and after an illness of more than a year. Mr. Whitley died during his sleep while staying as a guest of his son Ross Whitley at the Whitley Park"
  9. ^ Niver (1971), p. 262.
  10. ^ Robertson (2001), p. 21.
  11. ^ Robertson (2001), p. 21. The facility later became the Hollywood Film Laboratory, which is now called the Hollywood Digital Laboratory.
  12. ^ Feature-length films made in the Los Angeles area before The Squaw Man include From Dusk to Dawn (1913) and The Sea Wolf (1913). American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures.
  13. ^ Eileen Bowser, The Transformation of Cinema, 1907–1915, University of California Press, 1990, p. 160. ISBN 978-0520085343.
  14. ^ Koszarski (1994), p. 99.
  15. ^ Russell Leavitt, In California: A Fading Hollywood, TIME magazine, June 14, 1982
  16. ^ "Hollywood-Wilshire Health Center." Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  17. ^ "Post Office™ Location - HOLLYWOOD." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  18. ^ "Post Office™ Location - HOLLYWOOD PAVILION." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  19. ^ "Post Office™ Location - SUNSET." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  20. ^ City of Los Angeles Census 2000 Statistical Profile, Community Plan Area: Hollywood
  21. ^ Board District 4 Map. Los Angeles Unified School District. Retrieved on November 24, 2008.
  22. ^ "Board Members." Los Angeles Unified School District. Retrieved on November 24, 2008.
  23. ^ "Two LAUSD board members retire, Friedlander wins Shoah scholarship prize." The Jewish Journal. November 12, 2008.

Bibliography

  • Keith, Gaelyn Whitley (2006). The Father of Hollywood: The True Story. BookSurge Publishing. ISBN 1419641948.
  • Koszarski, Richard (1994). An Evening's Entertainment: The Age of the Silent Feature Picture, University of California Press. ISBN 0520085353.
  • Niver, Kemp R. (1971). Biograph Bulletins, 1896–1908. Los Angeles: Locare Research Group.
  • Robertson, Patrick (2001). Film Facts, Billboard Books.
  • Scott, Allen J. (2005). On Hollywood: The Place, The Industry. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691116830.

External links


Coordinates: 34°06′N 118°20′W / 34.1°N 118.333°W / 34.1; -118.333


Hollywood
—  Neighborhood of Los Angeles  —
Nickname(s): Tinseltown,
The Entertainment Capital of the World

Hollywood
Location within Central Los Angeles

Hollywood
Location within Western Los Angeles
Coordinates: 34°6′0″N 118°20′0″W / 34.1°N 118.333333°W / 34.1; -118.333333
Country United States
State California
County County of Los Angeles
City City of Los Angeles
Government
 - City Council Eric Garcetti, Tom LaBonge
 - State Assembly Mike Feuer (D), Vacant
 - State Senate Curren Price (D), Gilbert Cedillo (D)
 - U.S. House Xavier Becerra (D), Diane Watson (D), Henry Waxman (D)
Area[1]
 - Total 24.96 sq mi (64.6 km2)
Population (2000)[1]
 - Total 123,435
 Density 4,945/sq mi (1,909.3/km2)
ZIP Code 90027, 90028, 90038, 90046, 90068
Area code(s) 323

Hollywood is a neighborhood in Los Angeles, California - situated west-northwest of Downtown Los Angeles.[2] Due to its fame and cultural identity as the historical center of movie studios and movie stars, the word "Hollywood" is often used as a metonym of American cinema, and is often interchangeably used to refer to the greater Los Angeles area in general. The nicknames StarStruck Town and Tinseltown refer to Hollywood and its movie industry.[3] Today, much of the movie industry has dispersed into surrounding areas such as the Westside neighborhood,[4] but significant auxiliary industries, such as editing, effects, props, post-production, and lighting companies remain in Hollywood, as does the backlot of Paramount Pictures.

In addition, Hollywood is the home to various television, music, radio, and other entertainment studios and production companies, leading both the community and Los Angeles in general to also become known as "The Entertainment Capital of the World".

It is not the typical practice of the City of Los Angeles to establish specific boundaries for districts or neighborhoods, however Hollywood is a recent exception. On February 16, 2005, California Assembly Members Jackie Goldberg and Paul Koretz introduced a bill to require California to keep specific records on Hollywood as though it were independent. For this to be done, the boundaries were defined. This bill was unanimously supported by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce and the Los Angeles City Council. Assembly Bill 588 was approved by the Governor of California on August 28, 2006, and now the district of Hollywood has official borders. The border can be loosely described as the area east of Beverly Hills and West Hollywood, south of Mulholland Drive, Laurel Canyon, Cahuenga Boulevard, and Barham Boulevard, and the cities of Burbank and Glendale, north of Melrose Avenue and west of the Golden State Freeway and Hyperion Avenue. This includes all of Griffith Park and Los Feliz[citation needed] — two areas that were hitherto considered separate from Hollywood by most Angelenos.[who?] The population of the district, including Los Feliz, as of the 2000 census was 123,436 and the median household income was $33,409 in 1999.[1]

As a district within the Los Angeles city limits, Hollywood does not have its own municipal government. There was an official, appointed by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, who served as an honorary "Mayor of Hollywood" for ceremonial purposes only. Johnny Grant held this position from 1980 until his death on January 9, 2008.[5][6] However, no replacement has ever been named after Grant's death.

Contents

History

In 1853, one adobe hut stood in Nopalera, named for the Mexican Nopal cactus indigenous to the area. By 1870, an agricultural community flourished in the area with thriving crops of many common and exotic varieties. The area was known to these residents as the Cahuenga Valley, after the pass in the Santa Monica Mountains immediately to the north. Soon thereafter, land speculation would lead to subdivision of the large plots and an influx of homeowners.

In spite of the area's short history, it has been filled with events driven by optimistic progress. The name Hollywood was coined by H. J. Whitley, the "Father of Hollywood".[7][8][9] [10] [11] Whitley arranged to buy the 500 acre E.C. Hurd ranch and disclosed to him his plans for the land. They agreed on a price and Hurd agreed to sell at a later date. Before Whitley got off the ground with Hollywood, plans for the new town had spread to General Harrison Gray Otis, Mr Hurd's wife Mrs. Daeida Wilcox, and numerous others through the mill of gossip and land speculation.

Daeida learned of the name Hollywood from her neighbor in Holly Canyon (now Lake Hollywood), Ivar Weid, a prominent investor and friend of Whitley's.[12].[13] She recommended the same name to her husband, H. H. Wilcox. On February 1, 1887, Harvey filed a deed and map of property he sold with the Los Angeles County Recorder's office. Harvey wanted to be the first to record it on a deed. The early real-estate boom busted that same year, yet Hollywood began its slow growth.

By 1900, the region had a post office, newspaper, hotel, and two markets. Los Angeles, with a population of 102,479[14] lay 10 miles (16 km) east through the vineyards, barley fields, and citrus groves. A single-track streetcar line ran down the middle of Prospect Avenue from it, but service was infrequent and the trip took two hours. The old citrus fruit-packing house would be converted into a livery stable, improving transportation for the inhabitants of Hollywood. , first hotel in Hollywood, at the corner of what is now Yucca Street. It was built by Joakim Berg, a famous artist back in the 1890s.]]

1907.]]

Construction of the famous Hollywood Hotel, the first major hotel in Hollywood, was opened in 1902, by H. J. Whitley, by then-President of the Los Pacific Boulevard and Development Company of which he was a major shareholder. Having finally acquired the Hurd ranch and subdivided it, Whitley built the hotel to attract land buyers, and was eager to sell these residential lots among the lemon ranches lining the foothills. Flanking the west side of Highland Avenue, the structure fronted on Prospect Avenue, which, still a dusty, unpaved road, was regularly graded and graveled. The Hotel was to become internationally known and was the center of the civic and social life and home of the stars for many years.[15] His company was developing and selling one of the early residential areas, the Ocean View Tract.[16][17][18] Whitley did much to promote the area. He paid out many thousands of dollars for electric lighting, including bringing electricity and building a bank, as well as a road into the Cahuenga Pass. The lighting ran for several blocks down Prospect Avenue. Whitley's land was centered on Highland Avenue.[19][20][21]

Hollywood was incorporated as a municipality on November 14, 1903. The vote was 88 for incorporation and 77 against. On January 30, 1904, the voters in Hollywood decided, by a vote of 113 to 96, to banish liquor from the city, except when it was being sold for medicinal purposes. Neither hotels nor restaurants were allowed to serve wine or liquor before or after meals.

By 1910, because of an ongoing struggle to secure an adequate water supply, town officials voted for Hollywood to be annexed into the City of Los Angeles, as the water system of the growing city had opened the Los Angeles Aqueduct and was piping water down from the Owens River in the Owens Valley. Another reason for the vote was that Hollywood could have access to drainage through Los Angeles' sewer system. With annexation, the name of Prospect Avenue was changed to Hollywood Boulevard and all the street numbers in the new district changed. For example, 100 Prospect Avenue, at Vermont Avenue, became 6400 Hollywood Boulevard; and 100 Cahuenga Boulevard, at Hollywood Boulevard, changed to 1700 Cahuenga Boulevard.

Motion picture industry

Filmmaking in the greater Los Angeles area preceded the establishment of filmmaking in Hollywood. The Biograph Company filmed the short film A Daring Hold-Up in Southern California in Los Angeles in 1906.[22] The first studio in the Los Angeles area was established by the Selig Polyscope Company in Edendale, with construction beginning in August 1909.[23]

Prolific director D. W. Griffith was the first one to make a motion picture in Hollywood. His 17-minute short film In Old California, which was released on 10 March 1910, was filmed entirely in the village of Hollywood.[24] The first film by a Hollywood Studio, Nestor Motion Picture Company, was shot on October 26, 1911. The Whitley home was used as its set, and the unnamed movie was filmed in the middle of their groves on the corner of Whitley Ave and Hollywood Boulevard by directors Al Christie and David and William Horsley.[25]

Various producers and filmmakers moved bases from the east coast to escape punitive licensing from the Motion Picture Patents Company.

The first studio in Hollywood was established by the New Jersey–based Centaur Co., which wanted to make westerns in California. They rented an unused roadhouse at 6121 Sunset Boulevard at the corner of Gower, and converted it into a movie studio in October 1911, calling it Nestor Studio after the name of the western branch of their company.[26] The first feature film made specifically in a Hollywood studio, in 1914, was The Squaw Man, directed by Cecil B. DeMille and Oscar Apfel,[27] and was filmed at the Lasky-DeMille Barn among other area locations.

By 1911, Los Angeles was second only to New York in motion picture production,[28] and by 1915, the majority of American films were being produced in the Los Angeles area.[29]

Four major film companies — Paramount, Warner Bros., RKO and Columbia — had studios in Hollywood, as did several minor companies and rental studios. Hollywood had begun its dramatic transformation from sleepy suburb to movie production capital. The residential and agrarian Hollywood Boulevard of 1910 was virtually unrecognizable by 1920 as the new commercial and retail sector replaced it. The sleepy town was no more, and, to the chagrin of many original residents, the boom town could not be stopped.

1920s–1940s

By 1920, Hollywood had become world famous as the center of the United States film industry. In 1918, HJ Whitley commissioned architect A.S. Barnes to design Whitley Heights as a Mediterranean-style village on the steep hillsides above Hollywood Boulevard, and it became the first celebrity community.[30][31] The neighborhood is roughly bordered on the north and east by Cahuenga Boulevard, on the west by Highland Avenue, and on the south by Franklin Avenue. Among Whitley Heights' many famous residents have been Rudolph Valentino, Barbara Stanwyck, W.C. Fields, Jean Harlow, Carole Lombard, William Powell. Tyrone Power, Ellen Pompeo, Gloria Swanson, Rosalind Russell, Judy Garland, and Marlene Dietrich.[32][33][34][35][35][36][37][38][39][40]

From the 1920s to the 1940s, a large percentage of transportation to and from Hollywood was by means of the red cars of the Pacific Electric Railway.

Modern Hollywood

, taken from the Kodak Theatre.]] On January 22, 1947, the first commercial television station west of the Mississippi River, KTLA, began operating in Hollywood. In December of that year, The Public Prosecutor became the first network television series to be filmed in Hollywood. In the 1950s, music recording studios and offices began moving into Hollywood. Other businesses, however, continued to migrate to different parts of the Los Angeles area, primarily to Burbank. Much of the movie industry remained in Hollywood, although the district's outward appearance changed.

In 1952, CBS built CBS Television City on the corner of Fairfax Avenue and Beverly Boulevard, on the former site of Gilmore Stadium. CBS's expansion into the Fairfax District pushed the unofficial boundary of Hollywood farther south than it had been. CBS's slogan for the shows taped there was "From Television City in Hollywood..."

During the early 1950s the famous Hollywood Freeway was constructed from Four Level Interchange interchange in downtown Los Angeles, past the Hollywood Bowl, up through Cahuenga Pass and into the San Fernando Valley. In the early days, streetcars ran up through the pass, on rails running along the central median.

The famous Capitol Records Building on Vine St. just north of Hollywood Boulevard was built in 1956. The building houses offices and recording studios, which are not open to the public, but its circular design looks like a stack of 7-inch (180 mm) vinyl records.

The now derelict lot at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Serrano Avenue was once the site of the illustrious Hollywood Professional School, whose alumni reads like a Hollywood Who's Who of household "names". Many of these former child stars attended a "farewell" party at the commemorative sealing of a time capsule buried on the lot.

The Hollywood Walk of Fame was created in 1958 as a tribute to artists and other significant contributors within the entertainment industry. Official groundbreaking occurred on February 8, 1960, and the first star to be permanently installed was that of director Stanley Kramer (not Joanne Woodward, as commonly related).[41][42] A detailed history of the Walk can be found in the Walk of Fame main article. Honorees receive a star based on their achievements in motion pictures, live theatre, radio, television, and/or music, as well as their charitable and civic contributions.

In 1985, the Hollywood Boulevard Commercial and Entertainment District was officially listed in the National Register of Historic Places protecting important buildings and ensuring that the significance of Hollywood's past would always be a part of its future.

In June 1999, the Hollywood extension of the Los Angeles County Metro Rail Red Line subway opened, running from Downtown Los Angeles to the San Fernando Valley, with stops along Hollywood Boulevard at Western Avenue, Vine Street and Highland Avenue.

.]] The Kodak Theatre, which opened in 2001 on Hollywood Boulevard at Highland Avenue, where the historic Hollywood Hotel once stood, has become the new home of the Oscars.

While motion picture production still occurs within the Hollywood district, most major studios are actually located elsewhere in the Los Angeles region. Paramount Pictures is the only major studio still physically located within Hollywood. Other studios in the district include the aforementioned Jim Henson (formerly Chaplin) Studios, Sunset Gower Studios, and Raleigh Studios.

While Hollywood and the adjacent neighborhood of Los Feliz served as the initial homes for all of the early television stations in the Los Angeles market, most have now relocated to other locations within the metropolitan area. KNBC began this exodus in 1962, when it moved from the former NBC Radio City Studios located at the northeast corner of Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street to NBC Studios in Burbank. KTTV pulled up stakes in 1996 from its former home at Metromedia Square on Sunset Boulevard to relocate to Bundy Drive in West Los Angeles. KABC-TV moved from its original location at ABC Television Center (now branded The Prospect Studios) just east of Hollywood to Glendale in 2000, though the Los Angeles bureau of ABC News still resides at Prospect. After being purchased by 20th Century Fox in 2001, KCOP left its former home on La Brea Avenue to join KTTV on the Fox lot. The CBS Corporation-owned duopoly of KCBS-TV and KCAL-TV moved from its longtime home at CBS Columbia Square on Sunset Boulevard to a new facility at CBS Studio Center in Studio City. KTLA and KCET, both located on Sunset Boulevard, are the last broadcasters (television or radio) with Hollywood addresses.

In addition, Hollywood once served as the home of nearly every radio station in Los Angeles, all of which have now moved into other communities. KNX was the last station to broadcast from Hollywood, when it left CBS Columbia Square for a studio in the Miracle Mile in 2005.

In 2002, a number of Hollywood citizens began a campaign for the district to secede from Los Angeles and become, as it had been a century earlier, its own incorporated municipality. Secession supporters argued that the needs of their community were being ignored by the leaders of Los Angeles. In June of that year, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors placed secession referendums for both Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley on the ballots for a "citywide election." To pass, they required the approval of a majority of voters in the proposed new municipality as well as a majority of voters in all of Los Angeles. In the November election, both referendums failed by wide margins in the citywide vote.

Hollywood is served by several neighborhood councils, including the Hollywood United Neighborhood Council (HUNC)[43] and the Hollywood Studio District Neighborhood Council.[44] These two groups are part of the network of neighborhood councils certified by the City of Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Empowerment.[45] Neighborhood Councils cast advisory votes on such issues as zoning, planning, and other community issues. The council members are voted in by stakeholders, generally defined as anyone living, working, owning property, or belonging to an organization within the boundaries of the council.[46]

Revitalization

After many years of serious decline, when many Hollywood landmarks were threatened with demolition,[47] Hollywood is now undergoing rapid gentrification and revitalization with the goal of urban density in mind.[citation needed] Many developments have been completed, typically centered on Hollywood Boulevard. The Hollywood and Highland complex (site of the Kodak Theater) has been a major catalyst for the redevelopment of the area. In addition, numerous fashionable bars, clubs, and retail businesses have opened on or surrounding the boulevard, returning Hollywood to a center of nightlife in Los Angeles. Many older buildings have also been converted to lofts and condominiums. The W Hollywood Hotel is now open at the intersection of Hollywood and Vine.

Hollywood neighborhoods and communities

has long sat on Hollywood Boulevard near Hollywood High School and Grauman's Chinese Theater.]]

Government

Fire Services

Los Angeles Fire Department operates 4 fire stations Station 27, 41, 52, and 82 in Hollywood in the area.

County representation

The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services operates the Hollywood-Wilshire Health Center in Hollywood.[48]

Federal representation

The United States Postal Service operates the Hollywood Post Office,[49] the Hollywood Pavilion Post Office,[50] and the Sunset Post Office.[51]

Demographics

As of the 2000 census, there were 210,777 people residing in the Community Plan Area of Hollywood. The population density was 8,443 people per square mile (3,261/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 59.84% White (47.27% White Non-Hispanic), 9.44% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 4.28% African American, 0.62% Native American, 19.10% from other races, and 6.59% from two or more races. 34.51% of the population were Hispanic of any race. 49.63% of the population was foreign born; of this, 46.24% came from Latin America, 32.73% from Asia, 17.80% from Europe and 3.23% from other parts of the world.[52]

Education

[[File:|thumb|Hollywood High School]] Students who live in Hollywood are zoned to schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The area is within Board District 4.[53] As of 2008 Marlene Canter represents the district.[54] Canter announced that she will not seek re-election after her term expires in June 2009.[55]

Elementary schools:

  • Cheremoya Elementary School
  • Vineyard Street Elementary School
  • Ramona Elementary School
  • Gardner Elementary School
  • Valley View Elementary School
  • Grant Elementary School
  • Selma Ave. Elementary School

Middle schools:

Hollywood High School and Helen Bernstein High School are public high schools in the Hollywood area.

Christ the King Elementary School is a private school in the area.

For many years, the motion picture Industry had its own private Industry-run institution for child actors, the Hollywood Professional School.

Public libraries

The Will and Ariel Durant Branch and the Frances Howard Goldwyn – Hollywood Regional Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library are in Hollywood.

Landmarks

, on opening night in 2005.]] ]]

Special events

]]

  • The Academy Awards are held in late February/early March (since 2004) of each year, honoring the preceding year in film. Prior to 2004, they were held in late March/early April. Since 2002, the Oscars have been held at their new home at the Kodak Theater at Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue.
  • CINECON Classic Film Festival & Exposition (Annual timing is five days—connected to Labor Day weekend) Classic film memorabilia, expert presentations, author signings, and movie screenings with celebrity guests.
  • The annual Hollywood Christmas Parade: The 2006 parade on Nov 26th, was the 75th edition of the Christmas Parade. The parade goes down Hollywood Boulevard and is broadcast in the LA area on KTLA, and around the United States on Tribune-owned stations and the WGN superstation. [2]

See also

References

Notes
  1. ^ a b c "LA Almanac". http://web.archive.org/web/20060905042007/http://www.laalmanac.com/LA/la00c25.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-24. 
  2. ^ City of Los Angeles Map - Larger View
  3. ^ "Online Etymology Dictionary". Etymonline.com. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=tinsel&searchmode=none. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ Scott (2005).
  6. ^ "Johnny Grant, honorary Hollywood mayor, dies". CNN.com. January 10, 2008. http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/TV/01/10/grant.obit. Retrieved 2008-01-12. 
  7. ^ California Historian Volume 54, Number 4 published by Conference of California Historical Societies (2008) http://www.californiahistorian.com/magazine.html
  8. ^ Jonathan Magazine http://www.thefatherofhollywood.com/Jonathans.pdf (March 2009)
  9. ^ Rivers in the Desert By Margaret Leslie Davis http://books.google.com/books?id=7lvRnuwxmUoC&pg=PA92&dq=h+j+whitley&hl=en&ei=4P5-TOT3Koa4sAO7yeX0Cg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCoQ6AEwADgK#v=onepage&q=h%20j%20whitley&f=false (1993)
  10. ^ Hollywood - Britannica retrieved 9-3-2010 Real-estate magnate H.J. Whitley, known as the “Father of Hollywood,” transformed Hollywood into a wealthy and popular residential http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1476285/H-J-Whitley(1993)
  11. ^ http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/access/384306361.html?dids=384306361:384306361&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&date=Jun+04%2C+1931&author=&pub=Los+Angeles+Times&desc=DEATH+CALLS+H.+J.+WHITLEY&pqatl=google. Retrieved 2008-07-17. "H. J. Whitley, pioneer California real estate man and known as the "Father of Hollywood." died yesterday at the age of 83 years and after an illness of more than a year. Mr. Whitley died during his sleep while staying as a guest of his son Ross Whitley at the Whitley Park"
  12. ^ The Quarterly pg 93-94 http://books.google.com/books?id=WCMLAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA4-PA93&lpg=RA4-PA93&dq=hj+whitley&source=web&ots=ApmqanZhUR&sig=8AP2QOBYncpkFb2u8HgpMBrdpes#v=onepage&q=hj%20whitley&f=false
  13. ^ The Father of Hollywood by Gaelyn Whitley Keith (2010) pg. 127pg http://www.thefatherofhollywood.com/
  14. ^ No. HS-7. Population of the Largest 75 Cities: 1900 to 2000
  15. ^ Hollywood Daily Citizen (1931)http://www.thefatherofhollywood.com/TheFatherofHollywoodDiesHollywoodDailyCitizen.pdf
  16. ^ Los Angeles Times (may 18, 1902)http://www.thefatherofhollywood.com/media_Room.shtml
  17. ^ Los Angeles-Pacific Boulevard Company (1902) http://www.thefatherofhollywood.com/foh021%20Hollywood%20Grand%20View%20Track%20Map2.tif.
  18. ^ Los Angeles from the mountains to the sea: with selected biography ..., Volume 3 By John Steven McGroarty 1921 pg. 815 http://books.google.com/books?id=ExUVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA816&dq=whitley+hollywood&hl=en&ei=Ol8aTK_bIpHMNczy5asF&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CEcQ6AEwBzgU#v=onepage&q=whitley%20hollywood&f=false
  19. ^ Cahuenga Valley Sentinel (May 7, 1904).
  20. ^ Hollywood Citizen (Spring Addition March 4, 1914).
  21. ^ The Van Nuys News (July 6, 1923) http://www.thefatherofhollywood.com/Van%20Nuys%.
  22. ^ Niver (1971), p. 262.
  23. ^ Robertson (2001), p. 21.
  24. ^ Philip French (28 February 2010). "How 100 years of Hollywood have charted the history of America". Guardian.co.uk. http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2010/feb/28/philip-french-best-hollywood-films. Retrieved 24 May 2010. 
  25. ^ The Father of Hollywood by Gaelyn Whitley Keith (August 31, 2010)www.thefatherofhollywood.com
  26. ^ Robertson (2001), p. 21. The facility later became the Hollywood Film Laboratory, which is now called the Hollywood Digital Laboratory.
  27. ^ Feature-length films made in the Los Angeles area before The Squaw Man include From Dusk to Dawn (1913) and The Sea Wolf (1913). American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures.
  28. ^ Eileen Bowser, The Transformation of Cinema, 1907–1915, University of California Press, 1990, p. 160. ISBN 978-0-520-08534-3.
  29. ^ Koszarski (1994), p. 99.
  30. ^ Los Angeles Times 1-13-2008 http://www.whitleyheights.org/about8.html
  31. ^ Angeles by Laurie Connor http://www.whitleyheights.org/about5.html
  32. ^ Office of Historic Resources http://www.preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/whitley-heights
  33. ^ Discover Hollywood Magazine (Spring 2010) http://www.whitleyheights.org/about9.html
  34. ^ L A Conservancy http://www.laconservancy.org/initiatives/hpoz_WhitleyHts.pdf
  35. ^ a b Los Angeles Times (January 13, 2009) http://www.whitleyheights.org/about8.html
  36. ^ Architectural Digest (April 1996)http://www.whitleyheights.org/about1.html
  37. ^ Owensmouth Baby by Catherine Mulholland (1987)http://www.thefatherofhollywood.com/TheOwensmouthBabybyCatherineMulholland.pdf
  38. ^ William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles by Catherine Mulholland (2000)http://www.amazon.com/William-Mulholland-Rise-Los-Angeles/dp/0520234669/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277093955&sr=1-1
  39. ^ Who's Who in Los Angels County Pg. 334 (1925)
  40. ^ The Making of Hollywood by Margaret Virginia Whitley (1930
  41. ^ History of WOF hollywoodchamber.net; Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2010-05-31.
  42. ^ "Kramer First Name Put in Walk of Fame"(abstract). Los Angeles Times, March 29, 1960, p. 15. Full article: LA Times Archives Retrieved 2010-06-12.
  43. ^ Hollywood United Neighborhood Council
  44. ^ Hollywood Studio District Neighborhood Council
  45. ^ Los Angeles Department of Neighborhood Enpowerment
  46. ^ HSDNC.org: FAQs
  47. ^ Russell Leavitt, In California: A Fading Hollywood, TIME magazine, June 14, 1982
  48. ^ "Hollywood-Wilshire Health Center." Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  49. ^ "Post Office™ Location - HOLLYWOOD." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  50. ^ "Post Office™ Location - HOLLYWOOD PAVILION." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  51. ^ "Post Office™ Location - SUNSET." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
  52. ^ City of Los Angeles Census 2000 Statistical Profile, Community Plan Area: Hollywood
  53. ^ Board District 4 Map. Los Angeles Unified School District. Retrieved on November 24, 2008.
  54. ^ "Board Members." Los Angeles Unified School District. Retrieved on November 24, 2008.
  55. ^ "Two LAUSD board members retire, Friedlander wins Shoah scholarship prize." The Jewish Journal. November 12, 2008.

External links

Coordinates: 34°06′N 118°20′W / 34.1°N 118.333°W / 34.1; -118.333


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

The world's most famous sign
The world's most famous sign
For other places with the same name, see Hollywood (disambiguation).

No trip to Los Angeles is complete without a visit to its most famous district: Hollywood [1], best known as the self-declared entertainment capital of the world.

Hooray for Hollywood

The best-known song about Hollywood was introduced in the Busby Berkeley-directed 1937 film Hollywood Hotel. Since then it has become the unofficial anthem for the movie capital of the world, and is even played at the annual Academy Awards ceremonies.

A business and residential district in the city of Los Angeles, the core of Hollywood for a tourist is its three fascinating boulevards: Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood Boulevard, and Melrose Avenue. All three are worth seeing. Hollywood Blvd. is known for its entertainment history; Sunset Blvd. for its clubs and nightlife; and Melrose Ave. for its shopping, nightlife, and eclecticism.

Hollywood was founded as an independent city in 1903 and voted to merge with the City of Los Angeles in 1910. That same year also saw the birth of the Southern California motion picture industry when D. W. Griffith relocated his Biograph Company, sparking a westward migration of East Coast filmmakers. As movies exploded in popularity in the 1910s and '20s, the name Hollywood became synonymous with "the Industry." In the decades following World War II, Hollywood's glitz and glamour began to fade as most of the leading film studios moved to other places. The House Un-American Activities Committee combed through Hollywood in the late 1940s and 1950s and built its “Hollywood Blacklist,” which consisted of screenwriters, actors, directors, musicians and other entertainment employees who were suspected of being affiliated with the Communist Party. HUAC called on hundreds of “suspected” communists with in the industry to testify, many rolled over and named names, but some, like the “Hollywood Ten” refused to incriminate themselves in a crime they did not commit and were arrested. By 1952, the Hollywood Blacklist rejected over 300 people from working in the industry. It was not until the late 1950’s that the blacklist stopped terrorizing Hollywood.

In the 1980s, Hollywood was considered one of the worst neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The 1990s however, saw the beginning of community redevelopment efforts, and today Hollywood is once again one of the region's most vibrant areas.

Paramount is the only major studio still headquartered in Hollywood, but the area nonetheless remains an important center of the entertainment industry with its myriad production and broadcast facilities. Other affiliated businesses include Sunset-Gower Studios, Hollywood Center Studios, Raleigh Studios, Jim Henson Studios (a subsidiary of Walt Disney Pictures), and KTLA Studios (the local CW affiliate, housed on the original Warner Bros. lot). The other major studios are located to the north in the Universal City-Burbank corridor (Universal, Warner Bros., Disney, ABC, NBC, and DreamWorks). Most of the rest are to the west: Century City (Fox, MGM), the Fairfax District (CBS), and Culver City (Sony).

If you want to see where films are shot, take a tour at one of the major studios: Universal [2] "bundles" a full amusement park with its tour, while several other studios offer smaller, but interesting tours. In reality, most films are shot in warehouses and sound stages in Burbank and elsewhere.

If you want to see celebrities, pack your patience or be prepared to play the role of boulevardier. The chances of bumping into a celebrity are very low (mainly because most of the celebrities who live in Hollywood usually do not go out in public), unless you're willing to do a lot of "hanging out" at expensive restaurants in Beverly Hills, on Sunset Plaza, or in Malibu. You can easily see where they live by taking a tour or buying a star map for about $10 (remember Tatum O'Neal in the Bad News Bears?). You might also try the Book Soup bookstore or the Viper Room bar, both on Sunset Blvd. in West Hollywood, or a number of other locations in the area where the stars live their day-to-day lives.

A recommended place to see stars in Hollywood is Griffith Park Observatory, which appeared in "Rebel Without a Cause" and many other movies.

Get in

By bus

There is a Greyhound station located at 1715 N Cahuenga Blvd., approximately half a mile from the 'Walk of Fame'.

By car

Hollywood is close enough to the Westside to make car trips there relatively easy. If you are beginning your trip in Downtown Los Angeles--the proverbial center of Southern California's intricate freeway network--you can head north on US Highway 101 and exit on Hollywood Blvd. or Gower St. If traffic is a problem, and it will be during 1 -6PM, consider an alternate route by noting that many Los-Angeles Area freeways form concentric rings around the Downtown center. You might also consider surface streets: Santa Monica Boulevard is a major throughfare that links Hollywood with Beverly Hills and Santa Monica.

By rail

Hollywood's location is central to most other popular attractions. The Red Line subway stations at Hollywood/Vine and Hollywood/Highland can connect you to cross-town areas accessible by rail, and the stretch of Hollywood Blvd between Highland and Vine serves as a major terminal for the bus system.

Visitors from Orange County, home of Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, can get to Hollywood by taking Amtrak's Pacific Surfliner or Metrolink's Orange County Line to Los Angeles Union Station and then transferring to the Red Line.

By plane

Hollywood is served by Los Angeles International Airport (LAX [3]) or the slightly closer Bob Hope Airport (BUR [4]) in Burbank. Shuttle Van from LAX is $15 per person (one way, ask to be directed to the attendant at the Airport and give plently of notice to be picked up).

Get around

The main east-west streets of central Hollywood are Hollywood Blvd. and Sunset Blvd., intersected by the main north-south streets of La Brea Ave., Highland Ave., Cahuenga Blvd., Vine St., and Gower St. Any location within a few blocks of these intersections is likely to be a satisfying choice. Night-time pedestrian activity in this area is focused on Hollywood Blvd.

The main areas of Hollywood are walkable, and you could walk all the way from Hollywood Blvd. to Melrose, but most people would probably drive.

See

If you are lucky you could see tapings of several TV shows, in fact most of American's TV shows are taped in the Hollywood area. However it must be either a game show or a comedy show. If you want to see drama's and reality TV programming (unless it's about talent like American Idol) then you are out of luck.

Walk of Fame
Walk of Fame
  • Griffith Park Observatory, 2800 East Observatory Road, +1 213-473-0800, [5]. Tu-F Noon-10PM, Sa-Su 10AM-10PM, closed Mondays. Reopened in 2006 after a long remodel; reservations are no longer necessary. Popular tourist attraction that features an extensive array of space- and science-related displays.  edit
  • Grauman's Chinese Theater, 6925 Hollywood Boulevard, +1 323 464-8111, [6]. The most famous movie theatre in the world, Grauman's Chinese Theatre opened in 1927 and is home to the cement footprints, handprints, and (in some cases) otherprints of many of history's most famous movie stars. The theatre is also a former home of the Oscars, and today hosts many movie premieres. The forecourt that showcases the star's prints is free to all visitors. Movies are shown for $10, and half-hour walking tours are available for $5.  edit
  • Hollywood Sign— Hollywood's most recognizable landmark is easy to spot high up on Mount Lee in Griffith Park. You can drive part way up for a closer look, but you can't hike all the way to the sign.
  • Hollywood Wax Museum, 6767 Hollywood Blvd, +1 323-462-8860, [7]. 10AM-midnight. Wax musuem devoted to celebrities with over 180 figures at any time. Adults (13+) $17.95, children $8.95, 5 and under free.  edit
  • Los Angeles Fire Department Hollywood Museum 27, 1355 N. Caheunga Boulevard, +1 323 464-2727, [8]. Sa: 10AM-4PM. This museum is in the old Los Angeles City Fire Station 27, opened in 1930. It is fully restored to how it appeared in 1930 and contains historic fire apparatus.   edit
  • Ripley's Believe it or Not, 6780 Hollywood Blvd, +1 323-466-6335, [9]. Musuem that focuses on the odd, the unusual and the unbelievable. Features interactive illusions and a gallery.  edit
  • Walk of Fame, along Hollywood Boulevard and also Vine Street, [10]. The Hollywood Walk of Fame consists of a series of stars embedded in the sidewalk to commemorate famous movie, radio, theatre, and TV personalities. Since 1960, over two thousand stars have been immortalized; the schedule for upcoming star ceremonies is listed on the Walk of Fame's website.  edit
  • Kodak Theatre, 6801 Hollywood Bld, +1 323 308-6300, [11]. Located at the Hollywood & Highland Center (see "Buy" below). Hosts a wide range of live performances, including the annual Academy Awards.  edit
  • Hollywood Bowl, 2301 North Highland Avenue, +1 323 426-2829, [12]. America's most famous outdoor theatre hosts the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra as well as numerous other concert events. Traffic and parking can be a nightmare, so the $5 round-trip public shuttles [13] are highly recommended.  edit
  • Cemetery Movie Screenings, Hollywood Forever Cemetery, 6000 Santa Monica Blvd, (), [14]. Saturdays at 7pm, May-September. The Cinespia film society screens creepy older movies (recent showings include The Shining, Pee Wee's Big Adventure and Invasion of the Body Snatchers) every Saturday during the summer in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, with most proceeds going toward cemetery restoration. Crowds can be huge, so arrive prior to gates opening if you want a good vantage point. Most people bring a picnic dinner, blanket and jacket, and a DJ plays music prior to the showing to create a fun outdoor atmosphere. Parking is free within the cemetery, but a $10 donation is required for each person.  edit
  • Mulholland Drive, Mulholland Drive (Hollywood Hills). If you have access to a car, it really is worth taking a drive up to Mulholland Drive - the home of the stars. Apart from star seeking, the views out across Los Angeles and back along San Fernanado Valley are breathtaking.  edit

Buy

Hollywood Blvd. has countless urban clothing stores. Walk around and find stores with the latest LNG, Phat Farm, Timberland, Sean John, and many more. Melrose Avenue is the to go to place to feel like a star. Start by browsing through vintage clothing stores to maxing out the credit card at chic boutiques.

  • Beverly Center, 8500 Beverly Center. This shopping center includes 200 stores over 8 different levels. Great view of the city from the top floor of the mall.  edit
  • The Grove, 189 The Grove Drive, (888) 315-8883. Shopping and entertainment complex that will appeal to tourists that want to shop, while locals stop by to pick up fresh produce from the nearby Farmers Market.  edit
  • Amoeba Music, 6400 Sunset Blvd, +1 323-245-6400, [15]. The country's largest independent music store, Amoeba has three locations including Hollywood, Berkeley and San Francisco. Prices are slightly higher than at the discount stores, but the selection is enormous and just about any obscure record you could imagine is to be found somewhere on the shelves.  edit
  • Decades, 8214 Melrose Ave, (323) 655-1960. This Melrose Avenue shop is the place to go for vintage 1960s and 1970s couture and accessories.  edit
  • Frederick's of Hollywood, 6751 Hollywood Blvd., (323) 957-5953. During the golden years of Hollywood, all the superstars were wearing Fredericks, from Greta Garbo to Mae West to Marilyn Monroe. Today, the store is a lot less polished but still a good place to pick up glamorous lingerie.  edit
  • Monsier Marcel, 6333 W 3rd St, +1 (323) 939 7792, [16]. If you enjoy cheese and wine, then you'll love shopping here! Monsier Marcel is a delightful French deli in the Farmers Markets on 3rd Avenue where you can stock up on a range of gourmet produce, but most importantly there's over 500 vintage of wine on offer with a range of experienced staff to help you make your decisions.  edit
  • Pink's Hot Dogs, 709 N. La Brea Avenue, +1 323-931-4223, [17]. Su-Th 9:30AM-2:00AM, F-Sa 9:30AM-3:00AM. Serving the most famous hot dogs in Los Angeles since 1939, their chili dog will set you back just $2.50. Open every day from 9:30AM to 2AM or later. Expect a long but fairly fast-moving line.  edit
  • Scoops, 712 North Heliotrope Dr, +1 (323) 906 2649. Mon-Sat. 12:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Sun. 2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.. There's nothing quite like a giant cone of ice cream on a hot summer's day in LA, and scoops does all your favourite flavours plus some innovative creations like black currant lychee and brown bread!  edit
  • In-N-Out Burger, 7009 W Sunset Blvd, Hollywood, CA, 90028, [18]. This hugely popular Southern California burger chain has a surprisingly basic menu, but serves up some of the most popular burgers around, and does burgers well.  edit
  • Roscoe's House of Chicken' n Waffles, 1514 N Gower Street, +1 323-466-7453, [19]. For those ready to get their grub on, look no further--chicken, waffles, grits and greens. A few more locations scattered around town.  edit
  • Yai. By general learned agreement, the most authentic Thai food in the States can be found at "the Thai restaurant behind the 7-11 on Hollywood Boulevard by the 101." That's how it is known. If you are not from L.A., this can also serve as an introduction to L.A.-style directions. (The cross street, by the way, is Taft Avenue.) The Pad Thai here is light and perfumed and the curries hot enough to kill. And by authentic, that's exactly what is meant...don't expect any catering to tastes here.  edit
  • Palms Thai Restaurant, 5900 Hollywood Blvd, +1 323-462-5073, [20]. 11AM-2AM. Home of the infamous Thai Elvis, who will serenade you through dinner. The decor's authentically cheesy and Elvis sings the hits. While plain dishes such as fried rice or pad Thai are nothing to write home about, the curries (duck and panang), pad prik king, and anything off the "wild things" menu are excellent choices.  edit
  • Paru's, 5140 W Sunset Blvd. (just west of Normandie Ave.), [21]. M-F 4-10PM, Sa-Su 11AM-10PM. Head here for excellent South Indian vegetarian food in a charming garden. Especially wonderful masala dosas.  edit
  • Blu Jam Cafe, 7371 Melrose Ave (Melrose at Martel in the middle of all the best shopping), [22]. M-F 8AM to 6PM. Good food with options for everyone. Even some Czech items. Almost every meal is under $10.  edit
  • Little Armenia. East Hollywood's Little Armenia district has a few excellent cheap food options. Falafel Arax at 5101 Santa Monica Blvd. has excellent Falafel and Shawerma. Sassoun Bakery, at 5114 Santa Monica has great Lahmejun (Armenia pizza), boregs, zahtar (thyme) and tahini breads. Zankou Chicken at 5065 W. Sunset Blvd. has popular rotiserrie chicken with great garlic sauce. Carousel at 5112 Hollywood Blvd. has an amazing mezze (appetizer) selection, and great food.  edit
  • Travel south to East Hollywood and you can find countless "pupuserias". These thick, hand-made corn tortillas come with quesillo (Salvadorean cheese), pork, chicken, rice, beans, or "queso con loroco" (cheese and vine flower bud). Just look for signs that say "pupuserias." They usually run around $1.50-$2.00 a pupusa. A very delicious food.
  • Cheebo, 7533 W. Sunset Blvd, +1 323-850-7070, [23]. Everyone loves the Cheeb! A play on "cibo" (Italian for food), this place has great and creative food and a fun atmosphere. All-day breakfasts, excellent sandwiches, salads, pizzas by the foot and nice dinners to boot. Eat here for breakfast and you'll be back for lunch.  edit
  • Electric Karma, 8222 1/2 W. 3rd St., +1 323-653-2121, [24]. Sun-Thu 11:30am-10:30pm, Fri-Sat 11:30am-11:00pm. The "Most Romantic Indian Restaurant in Los Angeles" offers authentic Punjabi cuisine at reasonable prices for lunch and dinner; a beautiful, candle-lit dining room and open-air courtyard; unique cocktails; and warm, professional staff.  edit
  • Ammo, 1155 N. Highland Ave, [25]. Great for lunch or dinner, excellent and fashionable food.  edit
  • Mel's Drive-In, 1660 N. Highland Ave, +1-323-465-3111, [26]. Sun-Thu 6:30am-3:00am, Fri-Sat 24 Hrs.. Come here for traditional diner fare: cheeseburgers, french fries, and milkshakes. Part of the chain that opened in San Francisco in the late '40s. There is another location on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood.  edit
  • 101 Coffee Shop, 6145 Franklin Ave (at Vista Del Mar Avenue), +1-323-467-1175. 7:00am-3:00am, 7 days a week. Previously known as the Hollywood Hills Coffee Shop, this place has been popular for years, and the new owners have only improved it. Great selection of sandwiches, burgers, sweet potato french fries(!!), coffee and tea. It's not unheard of to spot celebs here.  edit
  • M Café, 7119 Melrose Ave, +1 323-525-0588, [27]. M-Sa 9AM-10PM, Su 9AM-9PM. One of the hottest new places in Hollywood. If you've been infected with Organica or Macrobiotica, head here now. It's often impossibly crowded and parking's a nightmare. They've got lots of premade things that are handy if you're short on time, otherwise it's better to order fresh, considering how far you'll be set back. Most mains hover around the $10-15 range.  edit
  • Musso & Frank Grill, 6667 Hollywood Blvd, +1-323-467-7788. For a taste of old Hollywood, this is the place. It's been famous for generations.  edit
  • Sushi Ike, 6051 Hollywood Blvd (in a mini-mall on the corner of Gower), +1-323-856-9972. A small and moderately-priced authentic Japanese restaurant with a great sushi bar and friendly chefs--one of the best this side of the 101.  edit
  • The Griddle Café, 7916 Sunset Blvd (east of Fairfax Ave), +1 323-874-0377. The Griddle Café is the best breakfast experience in LA. It features pages of every type of pancake you can imagine, which also happen to be twice as large as any pancake you've ever had, and still manage to be fluffy-thick and light on the tummy. Coffee is fresh, in a french press, and the menu features more than just breakfast. Short story: Food is awesome, service is great, but its always crowded. Don't worry though, they serve fast and you will feel the wait is worth it.  edit
  • All' Angelo Ristorante, 7166 melrose ave. - los angeles - CA 90046, +1 323 933-9540, [28]. Lunch - Friday: 12 - 2:30PM / Dinner - Monday through Saturday: 6 - 10:30PM / Closed Sunday. This authentic Italian eatery combines the relaxed atmosphere of a Los Angeles restaurant with a menu that's as close to a ticket to Rome as you can get without a passport. Their seasonal menu includes mouth watering timbale of cauliflower, authentic tripe, gourmet pastas, and hearty entrees. The owners bring a warm Italian sensibility to fresh dishes that would please any palate. This place is perfect for that special occasion!  edit
  • Cinespace, 6356 Hollywood Boulevard (2nd Level), +1-323-817-3456, [29]. Offering dinner in front of a large movie screen showing everything from recent movies to classics (movie shown Thursday, Friday & Saturday at 8PM). The food is reasonably good California cuisine, and the movie is included with the dinner price. With drinks, expect to spend between $25 and $40 per person. Reservations are required and should be made several days in advance. The restaurant becomes a club after movie showings.  edit
  • Yamashiro, 1999 N. Sycamore Avenue, +1-323-466-5125, [30]. This Japanese restaurant is perched above Hollywood, and on most nights provides an unbeatable view of the city, from downtown to Palos Verdes. The food is excellent, the gardens and architecture are elegant, and the restaurant has a fascinating history (the story's on the menu). Look for the small sign just west of the Magic Castle; valet parking only.  edit
  • Geisha House, +1 323-460-6300 (), [31]. Su-Th 6PM-1AM, F-Sa 6PM-1:30AM. Geisha House is a Modern Japanese Restaurant, Sushi Bar and Sake Lounge that embraces the flavor of traditional Japan while catering to the hip, sophisticated clientèle of Los Angeles. Don't be surprised by celebrity clientèle either. $31-50.  edit
  • Katsuya, 6300 Hollywood Blvd (at Vine St), +1 (323) 871-8777, [32]. The newest restaurant from acclaimed chef Katsuya Uechi, designed by Philippe Starck. Mouth-watering Japanese menu, destined to be a new Hollywood institution. His other restaurants around the LA area are rated as some of the best in the city.  edit
  • The Ivy, +1 310-274-6300. Mo-Fr 11:30AM-11PM, Sa 11AM-11PM, Su 10:30 AM-10AM. The Ivy is a Los Angeles mainstay and is frequented by celebrities. As for the menu, think comfort food, like fried chicken, Cajun prime rib and fish and fresh corn chowder. Request a seat on the famed patio for the best people watching. $31-50.  edit
  • ceFiore, 6922 Hollywood Blvd #107, +1 323-465-9097, [33]. Everyday 11AM-11PM. Right across the street from Grauman's Chinese Theatre you'll find one of LA's best places for tart Italian non-fat frozen yogurt and yogurt smoothies. Choose from 4 different frozen yogurt flavors: Original, Blackberry, Raspberry-Pomogranate, and Green Tea, along with a wide variety of fresh fruits and dry toppings. They also offer smoothies, herbal teas, and coffees.  edit
  • Pinkberry, 7123 Melrose Ave (just west of La Brea), +1 323-730-9889, [34]. A new, overly-hyped and rapidly spreading frozen yogurt chain. Choose from vanilla or green tea yogurt, and a great assortment of toppings from fresh berries to Cap'n Crunch. $2-5.  edit
  • The Juice Fountain, 6332 Hollywood Blvd (between Ivar and Vine), +1 323 464-8986. One of the best juice places in LA, it recently moved from its old location on Vine St. The juices are fresh and delicious, and its run by a sweet Hispanic family. Don't mess with the grandma! $3-5.  edit

Clubs and bars

Street life in Hollywood remains lively later than in most other areas, making the district a satisfying location to come home to. In fact, the best time to see Hollywood is in the evening, since the district serves along with the nearby Sunset Strip, as the regional center for clubs and nightlife. The Cahuenga Corridor (along Cahuenga between Sunset and Yucca) has several bars and lounges for bar-hopping.

  • Cat & Fiddle, 6530 Sunset Boulevard, +1-323-468-9045, [35]. A large and reasonably authentic British pub, the Cat & Fiddle always has a fun crowd, a good selection of beers and British pub food, and darts in the back room. The outdoor area is extraordinarily nice but fills early, while the inside of the bar is spacious but gets crowded in the evenings. Prices are reasonable given the location and decor, with beers from $5 per pint and food starting around $8.  edit
  • Roosevelt Hotel Lounge, 7000 Hollywood Boulevard (across the street from Grauman's Chinese Theatre), +1-323-466-7000 (), [36]. The lounge in this historic hotel is an upscale hotspot where one is likely to find Hollywood elite enjoying cocktails on weekdays, and a hipster party scene on weekends. Plenty of leather couches, candles, and a classy staff provides a sense of how the "other half" lives. Expect Hollywood prices to go along with the Hollywood atmosphere.  edit
  • PowerHouse, 1714 N Highland Ave Los Angeles, (323) 463-9438. One of the most laidback and relaxed bars in town, head here for cheap beer, darts and classic rock. Come as you are, and you will be glad you're here.  edit
  • Boardners, 1652 N Cherokee Ave Los Angeles. Power through the packed crowds and grab yourself a spot at this bar, where the drinks are strong and there's good people watching to be had.  edit
  • The Well, 6255 W Sunset Blvd. Make out as if you're a local and head to this so trendy it has a secret entrance door (hint, the entrance is on … Argyle, even though the address is on Sunset). While the crowd can be posey, its one of the better clubs in the area, and still manages to remain intimate and cosy.  edit
  • Velvet Margarita Cantina, 1612 N Cahuenga Blvd, (323) 469-2000, [37]. open til 4 am on weekends. Dark lounge inspired by Dia de los Muertos. Lots of tequila, beer, and of course margaritas.  edit

Sleep

Hollywood offers a wide range in price and quality of accommodations. The modern Renaissance Hotel and the antique Roosevelt Hotel provide an upscale choice, though the latter has a reputation for frequently closing its pool for private parties. There is a full range of standard motel chains including Travelodge, Motel 6, and Best Western. There are also a few well-located hostels.

  • Hollywood Heights Hotel, 2005 N Highland Avenue, +1-323-876-8600, [38]. This boutique-style hotel is relaxed, comfortable, and uniquely personal with 160 rooms fitted with amenities including FACE cosmetics and flat-panel TVs.  edit
  • Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, 7000 Hollywood Boulevard, [39]. A luxury boutique hotel right in the center of the action offering spacious, well-appointed rooms and suites with luxury bed and bath linens, bath products and state-of-the-art in-room technologies. It is a Hollywood legend, and was the location of the first Academy Awards ceremony.  edit
  • The Mondrian Hotel, 8440 Sunset Blvd, 1.877.477.8006, [40]. The Mondrian is a hip, sophisticated, West Hollywood hotspot. By day, the pool is a sea of beautiful people and by night, the same crowd fills the famous in-hotel restaurant Asia de Cuba, as well as the Sky Bar. Accommodations are luxurious. $395.  edit
  • Motel 6, 1738 N. Whitley Avenue, +1-323-464-6006 (fax: +1-323-464-4645), [41]. This is part of a budget model chain. It offers clean rooms in a convenient location. $70 for a double/twin.  edit
  • Renaissance Hollywood Hotel, 1755 N. Highland Avenue, +1-323-856-1200 (fax: +1-323-856-1205), [42]. This hotel has a stylish, modern hotel full of trendy charms such as contemporary art, a Zen garden, and an abstract lobby. Bright and vibrant colors are splashed around the rooms and accentuated with crisp white linens and bath products from Lather and Lather. Staff are multilingual and professional, and for a room with a view, pick one above the 10th floor. $300-420 (Doubles).  edit
  • Saharan Motor Hotel, 7212 Sunset Boulevard, 323-874-6700, [43]. The Saharan Motor Hotel features deluxe rooms and suites, luxury amenities and excellent service.  edit
  • Sunset Tower Hotel, 8358 Sunset Blvd, 323-654-7100, [44]. The Sunset Tower is perched high on the Sunset Strip. Built in 1929, this hotel was recently and beautifully renovated. Staff is excellent and the rooms are beautifully appointed and feature floor to ceiling windows. Swimming pool has sweeping views of Los Angeles. In the evening, the pool area is converted into an extension of the popular Tower Bar. Celebrity sightings! $350.  edit
  • USA Hostels, 1624 Schrader Blvd. (2 blocks from greyhound, or 5 blocks from metro off Hollywood Blvd.), 1-800-524-6783, [45]. The #1 rated hostel in Los Angeles (by hostelworld guests) in 2007 and 2005, USA Hostels is located in the heart of Hollywood off Hollywood Blvd on a quiet side street. This 150-bed hostel offers female and mixed 6- and 8-bed dorms and private rooms, free all-you-can-make pancakes, free coffee and tea all day and free wireless internet. The hostel runs many free and discounted activities and tours and a free shuttle three times per week to Venice and Santa Monica beaches.  edit

Contact

Internet

A few internet cafés are dotted around town, but a better (and cheaper) option if you've got a laptop is to take advantage of the free wireless internet at the numerous coffee shops along and off of either Hollywood Blvd or Melrose Ave.

  • Caffe Etc, 6371 Selma Ave, +1 323 464-8824, [46]. Everyday, 7AM-11PM. Free wireless internet (if you've got a laptop), decent coffees and teas, and sandwiches and desserts to snack on.  edit
  • Downtown LA – Rapidly renovating, it's a great place for a meal or to catch a show at the Walt Disney Concert Hall and best of all, it's reachable by Metro.
  • Universal City – Home to Universal Studios and a short trip via US Highway 101 or the Metro Red Line.
  • Studio City – Among other attractions, offers perhaps the highest density of sushi restaurants in Los Angeles.
  • West Hollywood – This may be Hollywood's less-famous sibling, but it boasts a bustling nightlife and features excellent restaurants, clubs, and hotels.
Routes through Hollywood
Santa BarbaraUniversal City  N noframe S  Los AngelesEND
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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

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Wikipedia

Proper noun

Singular
Hollywood

Plural
-

Hollywood

  1. Area of Los Angeles, known as the center of the American motion picture industry.
  2. (by extension) The American motion picture industry, regardless of location.

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Simple English

[[File:|thumb| The Hollywood Sign]]

File:Hollywood boulevard from kodak
Hollywood Boulevard, as seen from the Kodak Theatre

Hollywood is a district in Los Angeles, California. It is famous around the world as a place where movies and television shows are made. It has many different attractions such as the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Universal Studios and the famous Hollywood Sign. The word Hollywood can also mean the movie industry that is in Hollywood. Many tourists come to the area.

Many historic Hollywood theaters are used as venues and concert stages to premiere major theatrical releases and host the Academy Awards. It is a popular destination for nightlife and tourism and home to the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Hollywood Walk of Fame was created in 1958 and the first star was placed in 1960. It is a sidewalk along the Hollywood Boulevard and the USA. There are more than 2000 five-points stars on the walk featuring the names of artists working in the entertainment industry.

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