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Gold vessel for chrism. The vessel is etched with the letters S.C. for sanctum chrisma.

Chrism (Greek word literally meaning "an anointing"), also called "Myrrh" (Myron), Holy anointing oil, or "Consecrated Oil," is a consecrated oil used in the Roman Catholic, Oriental Orthodox, and Eastern Orthodox churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in Old-Catholic churches, as well as Anglican and Lutheran churches in the administration of certain sacraments and ecclesiastical functions.

Pure or scented olive oil, although typically not called chrism today, has been called chrism in the past, including oil used by Protestants and Restorationists in some forms of Baptism, Confirmation, Anointing of the Sick and foot washing. In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or Mormons, chrism is used in some of their temple ordinances.

Contents

Early Christian usage

Chrismatory for ritual oil from Germany, 1636[1] (silver-gilt, Victoria and Albert Museum, London).

Multiple early Christian documents discuss the "ordinance" or "several ceremonies...explained in the Apostolical Constitutions" of "chrism," including documents by Theophilus and Tertullian. The most detailed version of the practice is by Cyril of Jerusalem who details how ointment or oil was "symbolically applied to thy forehead, and thy other organs of sense" and that the "ears, nostrils, and breast were each to be anointed." Cyril states that the "ointment is the seal of the covenants" of baptism and God’s promises to the Christian who is anointed. Cyril taught that being "anointed with the Holy anointing oil [Chrism] of God" was the sign of a Christian (Christos means "anointed"), and a physical representation of having the Gift of the Holy Spirit (Holy Ghost), and it retains this meaning in Catholicism and Orthodoxy today. He says, "Having been counted worthy of this Holy Chrism, ye are called Christians, verifying the name also by your new birth. For before you were deemed worthy of this grace, ye had properly no right to this title, but were advancing on your way towards being Christians."{On the Mysteries 3.5)

Etymology

Greek χρῖμα or χρῖσμα, later χρίσμα "ointment, unguent, anointment" besides χρῖσται "oil, oil flask" and χριστός "fit to be anointed", in LXX and NT "the anointed, Messiah", "Christ", is from a verb χρίω, χρίομαι (long -ῑ-, later also short -ῐ-; aorist χρῖσαι, -σασθαι, -σθῆναι, perfect κέχριμαι, -ισμαι, -ικα), "smear, anoint, rub or daub with oil or grease".

The further connection of the Greek verb to Indo-European forms is fairly certain, stemming from Proto-Indo-European *ghrei-, "to rub". Cognates include Lithuanian gr(i)ejù, griẽti "skimming (of cream)" and Middle Low German grēme "dirt", Old English grīma "mask, helm, spectre" (from a meaning "covered, concealed", c.f. Tarnhelm), English grime, and possibly Phrygian gegreimenan "painted, ornamented, inscribed". A much more obvious cognate, and one with comparable religious significance, is Sanskrit ghṛtə घृत ("sprinkled"), modern ghee, used in Vedic and Hindu custom in anointment and other rituals.

χρίσμα came into Latin as chrisma, into Old French, by contamination with Latin cramum "cream" as cresme (Modern French crème) and finally into English, in the 14th century as creme, spelled cream with the Great Vowel Shift from the 15th century (crème as a dessert ingredient was re-borrowed in the 19th century). Chrism was loaned into English earlier, in the 11th century as crism, spelled with ch- from the 16th century.

Roman Catholicism

Glass ambry containing vessels for holy oil: chrism, oil of catechumens, and the for the anointing of the sick.
Stove and vessels for preparation of Chrism (Patriarchal residence, Moscow Kremlin).
Stove for preparation of Chrism, detail.


Chrism is essential for the Catholic Sacrament of Confirmation/Chrismation, and is prominently used in the sacraments of Baptism and Holy Orders. Those to be confirmed or chrismated, after receiving the laying on of hands, are anointed on the head by the bishop or priest. In baptism, if the person baptized is not to be immediately confirmed or chrismated, the minister anoints them with chrism. Newly ordained priests are anointed with chrism on the palms of their hands, and newly ordained bishops receive an anointing of chrism on their foreheads. It is also used in the consecration of objects such as churches and altars.

Invitation to the Chrism Mass of Pope John Paul II on Maundy Thursday, 20 April 2000.

In former times, chrism was used to consecrate patens and chalices as well. The Sign of the Cross would be made with the chrism on the interior parts the chalice and paten where the Eucharist would rest; the Cross would then be smeared to cover the entire interior parts. The chalice and paten would need to be consecrated with the chrism again if they were re-gilded. This ritual could only be performed by a Bishop or a priest with the faculties to do so. However, this is no longer the practice, and currently a simple blessing by a priest suffices.

Chrism is usually olive oil (although other plant oils can be used in cases when olive oil is unavailable) and is scented with a sweet perfume, usually balsam. Under normal circumstances, chrism is consecrated by the bishop of the particular church in the presence of the presbyterium at the Mass of the Chrism, which takes place on Holy Thursday. The oil of catechumens and the oil of the sick are also blessed at this Mass.

These holy oils are usually stored in special vessels known as chrismaria and kept in a cabinet known as an ambry. When the oils are distributed to a priest for him to use in his ministy they are kept in a smaller vessel with three compartments, known as an "oil stock". There is also a type of oil stock that is shaped like a ring, to make the anointing easier. The "jewel" of the ring is a container with a removable lid.

Eastern Christianity

Chrismarium used in Russia before the revolution of 1917. The vessel is named "Alabaster" in reference to Matthew 26:7.

The primary use of chrism in the Oriental Orthodox, Eastern Orthodox, and Eastern Catholic Churches as well as in the Assyrian Church of the East, is for Chrismation, which under normal circumstances always immediately follows Baptism, even for infants. Here the blessing of the bishop upon the chrism functions as a substitute for the direct imposition of hands, and chrism is normally used even when the bishop is performing the baptism himself. Its other notable modern use is in the consecration of church buildings, where it is used to anoint the walls and the altar table. Formerly, emperors and kings of monarchies where Orthodoxy was the state religion would be anointed with chrism at their coronations.

Chrism is made during Holy Week beginning on Holy Monday and culminating in the Divine Liturgy on Holy Thursday when it is carried in the Great Entrance and placed upon the altar. It is primarily olive oil with the addition of a range of aromatic essences, patterned after the anointing oil described in Exodus 30:22-33. It can only be consecrated by an autocephalous church. The service is performed by the primate of the Church (e.g. Patriarch) or by other bishop which is specially appointed by him. On completion, chrism is distributed to all the bishops, who, in turn, give it to their parishes when needed. It is not made on an yearly basis, but only when supplies run short.

At the Patriarchate of Constantinople the chrism is produced roughly once every 10 years. It is made according to an ancient formula of the Jewish prophets and patriarchs that consists of 57 ingredients, while the flame needed to boil the mixture during the preparation is made by burning old and disfigured icons.[2]

Anglicanism and Lutheranism

The primary use of chrism in Anglican and Lutheran churches is for the Rite of Chrismation, which may be included as a part of Baptism, even for infants. Here the blessing of the bishop upon the chrism usually functions as a substitute for the direct imposition of episcopal hands, and chrism is normally used even when the bishop is performing the baptism himself. Its other notable use is in the consecration of church buildings, where it may be used to anoint the walls, the altar/table, and the place for reservation of the Eucharistic sacrament for the sick.

Chrism is usually olive oil (although other plant oils can be used in cases when olive oil is unavailable) and is scented with a sweet perfume, usually balsam. Under usual circumstances, chrism is consecrated by the bishop of the particular church in the presence of the presbyterium at the Holy Eucharist for the Reaffirmation of Ministerial Vows (or Chrism Mass), which takes place on Maundy Thursday. The oil of catechumens and the oil of the sick are usually also consecrated at this liturgy. Practices vary for the blessing of the chrism, from interpolations within the Eucharistic Prayer, to specific prayers of consecration, used at the discretion of the minister. Some Lutheran liturgical books, however, make provision for a pastor who is not a bishop (a presbyter) to consecrate chrism in time of need and in the absence of the bishop.

Latter-day Saints

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon or LDS Church) who hold the Melchizedek priesthood may use consecrated oil in performing the ordinance of blessing of the "sick or afflicted", though oil is not required if it is unavailable. The priesthood holder anoints the recipient's head with a drop of oil, then lays hands upon that head and declare their act of anointing. Then another priesthood holder joins in, if available, and pronounces a "sealing" of the anointing and other words of blessing, as he feels inspired. Melchizedek priesthood holders are also authorized to consecrate any pure olive oil and often carry a personal supply in case they have need to perform a blessing. Oil is not used in other blessings, such as for people seeking comfort or counsel.[3]

Prior to January 16, 2005, a nearly identical procedure to that described by Cyril in his On the Mysteries. III: Lecture XXI On Chrism was performed in Latter-day Saint temples. A modified version of the ordinance is still performed. See Washing and anointing.

See also

References

External links

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