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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Homin is a term coined by the zoologist Dmitri Bayanov to describe cryptozoological large, hairy primates. Notable examples include the North American Bigfoot, central Asian Almas and Himalayan Yeti. Bayanov defines “homin” as a “non-sapiens hominid”.

Contents

Overview

The contemporary practice of using “homin” appears to be restricted mostly to Russian hominologists, and their close associates, including North Carolina’s William Duncan, California’s Bobbie Short, and Tennessee’s Mary Alayne Green and Janice Carter Coy. While the Russian term “hominology” has persevered and spread among Bigfoot researchers, in general, “homin” has not.

One reason it is not more popular may be that in the English-speaking world, the word “homin” is visually and linguistically experienced as truncated, almost a typographical error. Also, for those that understand root words, it is viewed as more related to being from the Latin homin-, stem of Latin homo, meaning “human being,” than the generalized Bigfoot appears to require.

Nevertheless, followers of the Russians, as noted, tend to use “homin” heavily, as reflected, for example, in Will Duncan’s title of his 2002 paper, “The Predictability of Homin Behavior,” and in conjunction with the word “hirsute” (hairy) by Bobbie Short.

Quotes

“A Registered Nurse by occupation, Bobbie [Short] is an active Bigfoot researcher and field investigator with a growing database of hirsute homin sightings.” - Anon., Crypto: Hominology Special Number I

“Actually, homin-ology can be nothing but the science of homins.” - Dmitri Bayanov, Crypto: Hominology Special Number I

In popular culture

  • In the MMO The Saga of Ryzom the four playable humanoid races are collectively referred to as homins.

External links

See William Duncan's Predictability of Homin Behavior.


    • [a reference more detailed would be appreciated]**
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