Honda Center: Wikis

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Honda Center
"The Pond", "The Duck Pond"
Honda Center.svg
Honda-ext-arch.JPG
Former names Anaheim Arena (1993)
Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim (1993-2006)
Location 2695 E. Katella Avenue, Anaheim, California 92806
Coordinates 33°48′28″N 117°52′36″W / 33.80778°N 117.87667°W / 33.80778; -117.87667Coordinates: 33°48′28″N 117°52′36″W / 33.80778°N 117.87667°W / 33.80778; -117.87667
Broke ground June 1991
Opened June 19 1993
Owner City of Anaheim
Operator Anaheim Arena Management, LLC
(a Anaheim Ducks subsidiary)
Construction cost $123 million
Architect Populous (formerly HOK Sport)
Capacity Concerts (center stage) 18,900; (end stage) 18,325
Basketball: 17,608
Ice hockey: 17,174
Theatre: 8,400
Tenants
Anaheim Ducks (NHL) (1993–present)
Los Angeles Clippers (NBA) (occasional games 1994–1999)
Anaheim Bullfrogs (RHI) (1993-1997)
Anaheim Splash (CISL) (1994–1997)
Anaheim Piranhas (AFL) (1996–1997)
Anaheim Storm (NLL) (2004–2005)

The Honda Center, previously known as the Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim and colloquially called the The Pond, is an indoor arena in Anaheim, California. The arena is home to the National Hockey League's Anaheim Ducks and was home of the former National Lacrosse League's Anaheim Storm, which folded in 2005. Originally named the Anaheim Arena, it was completed in 1993 at a cost of $123 million. Arrowhead Water paid $15 million for the naming rights over 10 years in October 1993.[1] Honda later acquired the naming rights to the arena for $60 million over 15 years which changed its name in October 2006.

Panorama of Honda Center's interior before a playoff hockey game.

Contents

History

The arena opened on June 19, 1993, with a Barry Manilow concert as its first event. Since then, it has been host to a number of events, such as the 2003 and 2007 Stanley Cup Finals. On June 6, 2007, the Anaheim Ducks defeated the Ottawa Senators, 6–2, in Game 5 of the Finals at Honda Center to clinch the franchise's first-ever Stanley Cup championship. The Ducks have never lost a Finals game played at the arena.[2]

Various World Wrestling Entertainment major events have been held here, such as WrestleMania XII, WrestleMania 2000 (XVI), and the Royal Rumble in 1999. UFC 59, UFC 63, and UFC 76 have been at Honda Center as well. It hosted the 2005 IBF World Championships for badminton in 2005. It has also hosted many concerts, such as AC/DC, Kiss, Machine Head, TLC (highest grossing concert), Buckcherry,Gwen Stefani, Depeche Mode, David Bowie, Morrissey, Nine Inch Nails, Aerosmith, Mariah Carey, Gloria Estefan, Celine Dion, Boyz II Men, Coldplay, R.E.M., U2, Shakira, Korn, Metallica, Madonna, Phil Collins, Queen + Paul Rodgers, Britney Spears, Barbra Streisand, Shania Twain, Destiny's Child, Beyoncé Knowles, 'N Sync, Maroon 5, Justin Timberlake, Dave Matthews Band, Miley Cyrus, Jonas Brothers, Christina Aguilera, Circa Survive, Janet Jackson,The Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney, Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony, Warped Tour 2000 (in the parking lot for 2 days in a row), and many more. From 1994 to 1998, it served as a second home for the NBA's Los Angeles Clippers. It was the home arena for the Anaheim Bullfrogs of Roller Hockey International from 1993 to 1999 and for the Anaheim Piranhas of the Arena Football League from 1996 to 1997. Since 1994, the arena has hosted the annual John R. Wooden Classic. This arena has also hosted a PBR Bud Light Cup (later Built Ford Tough Series) event annually since 1998. The arena has also hosted the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament three times, as the West Regional site - 1998, 2001, and 2003. It hosted the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament West Regional site in 2008. It even hosted the NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championship (the Frozen Four) in 1999, underscoring the popularity of hockey in the region. On December 6, 2000, music legend Tina Turner played her last concert at the arena for the record breaking Twenty Four Seven Tour, but after popular demand, Turner returned to the arena before a sellout crowd on October 14, 2008, for her Tina!: 50th Anniversary Tour.

A panorama of Honda Center's exterior.

Honda Center lies northeast across California State Route 57 from Angel Stadium (where Major League Baseball's Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim play) and roughly 3 miles from Disneyland Park. It is also walkable from Amtrak and Metrolink's Anaheim station, which is located on Angel Stadium's parking lot.

The arena seats up 17,174 for its primary tenant, the Ducks. It takes only five hours to convert Honda Center from a sporting arena to an 8,400-seat amphitheater. There are 84 luxury suites in the building, which has hosted 17.5 million people, as of 2003.

Broadcom chairman and billionaire, Henry Samueli, owns the company that operates the arena, Anaheim Arena Management, LLC, and the arena's primary tenant, the Ducks, giving him great flexibility in scheduling events and recruiting new tenants. Samueli hopes to bring an NBA franchise to the arena.

Concerts, Film, and Television

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ In 2003, all the games in the final were won by the home team. In 2007, the Ducks had home ice advantage during the finals and the only game they lost was Game 3, in Ottawa.

External links

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