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Horserace
Horserace setup.JPG

Initial setup with eight links.
Gameplay
Type Drinking
Players 2+
Cards 52
Deck Anglo-American
Playing time 5 minutes

Horserace is a drinking game using playing cards that is inspired by horse racing. Participants bet amounts of alcohol on one of four aces, much like bettors would bet money on horses at a racing track.

Contents

Equipment

  • 1 Standard deck of playing cards
  • Alcohol
  • Flat playing surface

Preparation

The horseracing game requires active participation by only one person: the announcer. The announcer should preferably be an exciting narrator.[1] The announcer prepares the field by searching through the deck, taking out the ace (horse) of each suit, and laying them face-up and side-by-side at one end of the table (this is "the gates"). He then shuffles the deck and lays out a variable number of cards face-down (these form the "links" of the race) in a straight line perpendicular to the row of aces. A typical race has from six[1] to eight[2] links. The cards thus appear to form an "L" or the two legs of a right triangle. The field is now set.

Betting

Before the game begins, each player makes bets based on their favorite horse. Bets are generally as simple as "five on diamonds" but can get as complex as any true horse race. Announcers may choose to allow such exotic bets as Trifectas, Exactas, Daily Doubles, etc. In another variation, players may simply pick their favorite horse, and the payout is set at 20 drinks for the first-place horse, 15 for second place, and 10 for third place.[2] Placing a small bet on the "first horse out of the gates" is a popular bet that excites the crowd early. Penalties may be applied to bettors who bet on an ace that never leaves the starting gates. Safeguards are often instituted to prevent players from placing exorbitant bets such as "one hundred on hearts." Such safeguards may include setting bet limits, requiring players to drink a portion of their bet before the race begins, or forcing losers to drink a portion of their bet at the end.[1][2]

At the end of a race, drinks are distributed based on the initial bets. Several variations exist. Winners may distribute drinks equal to the amount they bet,[1] or double.[3] Winners may be immune to drinking. Losers may have to drink the amount of their initial bet, the amount that the winners distribute,[2] or both.[1]

Gameplay

Once all bets are in, the announcer begins the race. He flips over the top card of the remaining deck. Only the suit of this card matters; the ace of that suit moves forward to the first link. The announcer narrates the ebb and flow of the game as the bettors cheer on their horse. The announcer continues flipping cards and advancing horses accordingly until one horse wins by passing the final link into the winner's circle.[1][2]

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Variations

One variation of gameplay is faltering. Each time a horse moves up to a new link for the first time (and only the first time), the announcer flips over the card on the side of that link. The suit shown on this sideboard card must move back one space (falter).[3] Thus in an eight-link horserace, there are eight instances of faltering that can totally change the outcome of the game. As a rule, any horse in the gates can not be knocked back any further by faltering. Another variation is the stumble in which all horses except the leader move forward one space if a designated wild card is flipped over, such as the Joker.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Horse Racing description at Pinky McDrinky.com
  2. ^ a b c d e Drinking Game: Horse Race description at Barmeister.com
  3. ^ a b Horse Race Drinking Games Rules and Directions at DrinkingGames.com

External links


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