The Full Wiki

House of Commons: Wikis

  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on House of Commons

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

British House of Commons at the Palace of Westminster

The House of Commons is the name of the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of Ireland and North Carolina.

In the UK and Canada, the Commons holds much more legislative power than the upper house of parliament (the House of Lords and the Senate, respectively). The leader of the majority party in the House of Commons usually becomes the prime minister. Since 2005, the House of Commons of the United Kingdom has had 646 elected members; this will increase to 650 at the next General Election. The Canadian House of Commons has 308 members. The Commons' functions are to consider through debate new laws and changes to existing ones, authorise taxes, and provide scrutiny of the policy and expenditure of the Government. It has the power to give a Government a vote of no confidence.

Contents

History and naming

The British House of Commons was created to serve as the political power base and voice for the free subjects of the realm, originally selected from the business and merchant classes of each local area to represent all the Sovereign's subjects who were not Lords Temporal or Spiritual. These estates are represented in the House of Lords. The name of the House does not originate from the fact that it represented the 'common' people, but rather from the fact that the constituencies represented were based on the commons (land areas) of England. The House of Commons was thus elected while members of the upper house were derived from hereditary title and descent, family lineage, or a service to the realm that warranted special recognition, such as the Law and Spiritual Lords.

Throughout their histories, the British and Canadian Houses of Commons have become increasingly representative, as suffrage has been extended. Both bodies are now elected via universal adult suffrage. In both countries, the House of Commons may be prorogued for election only by the Crown, represented outside of the United Kingdom by the Governor General of each Commonwealth realm.

The Canadian House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa

Specific bodies

The Irish House of Commons
The first purpose-built House of Commons chamber in the world. Painted c.1780.

Although it is common to associate the title of "House of Commons" with the Westminster system in general, in practice, only two states actually use the title.

British Isles

Canada

America

See also


The House of Commons is the name of the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of Ireland and North Carolina. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once British colonies include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, and the New Zealand House of Representatives.

In the UK and Canada, the Commons holds much more legislative power than the upper house of parliament (the House of Lords and the Senate, respectively). The leader of the majority party in the House of Commons usually becomes the prime minister. Since 2010, the House of Commons of the United Kingdom has had 650 elected members. The Canadian House of Commons has 308 members.[1] The Commons' functions are to consider through debate new laws and changes to existing ones, authorise taxes, and provide scrutiny of the policy and expenditure of the Government. It has the power to give a Government a vote of no confidence.

Contents

History and naming

The British House of Commons was created to serve as the political power base and voice for the free subjects of the realm, originally selected from the business and merchant classes of each local area to represent all the Sovereign's subjects who were not Lords Temporal or Spiritual (represented in the House of Lords). The House is so named not because it represented the commoners, but rather because the constituencies represented were based on the commons (land areas) of England. The House of Commons was thus elected while members of the upper house were derived from hereditary title and descent, family lineage, or a service to the realm that warranted special recognition, such as the Law and Spiritual Lords.

Throughout their histories, the British and Canadian Houses of Commons have become increasingly representative, as suffrage has been extended. Both bodies are now elected via universal adult suffrage. In both countries, the House of Commons may be prorogued for election only by the Crown, represented outside of the United Kingdom by the Governor General of each Commonwealth realm. [[File:|thumb|left|The Canadian House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa]]

Specific bodies


The first purpose-built House of Commons chamber in the world. Painted c.1780.]] Although it is common to associate the title of "House of Commons" with the Westminster system in general, in practice, only two states actually use the title.

British Isles

Canada

America

See also

References


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
House of Commons

Plural
-

House of Commons

  1. (Politics, British, Canadian) The lower house of the UK and Canadian Houses of Parliament
    • 1842, William Chambers, Robert Chambers, Chambers's Information for the People, page 178
      Reckoning from 1802 till November 15, 1837, there were thirteen Houses of Commons

Translations

See also


Simple English

House of Commons is the name of the lower house in several commonwealth parliaments

  • The House of Commons of Southern Ireland (1921-1922)
  • The House of Commons of Northern Ireland (1921-1971)







Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message