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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

House of Oldenburg
Blason Grand-duché d'Oldenbourg (Grandes armes).svg
Country Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, Russian Empire, Kingdom of Denmark, Kingdom of Norway, Kingdom of Sweden, Kingdom of Greece, Duchy of Saxe-Lauenburg, Duchy of Schleswig-Holstein
Titles
Founder Christian I
Final ruler
Russia:
Nicholas II of Russia (1894–1917)
Sweden:
Charles XIII of Sweden (1809–1818)
Oldenburg:
Friedrich August II (1900–1918)
Saxe-Lauenburg:
Christian IX (1864)
Schleswig-Holstein:
Christian IX (1864)
Augustenborg:
Albert (1921–1931)
Current head Christoph, Prince of Schleswig-Holstein
Founding year 1448
Deposition
Russia:
February Revolution 1917
Sweden:
1818 (line extinct)
Greece:
Greek military junta of 1967–1974 1973
Oldenburg:
German Revolution of 1918–19 1918
Saxe-Lauenburg:
Second Schleswig War 1864
Schleswig-Holstein:
Second Schleswig War 1864
Augustenborg:
1931 (line extinct)
Cadet branches

The House of Oldenburg is a North German dynasty and one of Europe's most influential Royal Houses.

It rose to prominence when Count Christian I of Oldenburg was elected King of Denmark in 1448, and of Norway in 1450. The house has occupied the Danish throne ever since.

Marriages of medieval counts of Oldenburg had paved the way for their heirs to become kings of various Scandinavian kingdoms. In 14th century, through marriage with a descendant of King Valdemar I of Sweden and of King Eric IV of Denmark, a claim to Sweden and Denmark was staked, since 1350.

At that time, its competitors were the successors of Margaret I of Denmark. In the 15th century, the Oldenburg heir of that claim married Hedwig of Schauenburg, a descendant of Euphemia of Sweden and Norway and also a descendant of Eric V of Denmark. Since descendants better situated in genealogical charts died out, their son Christian (the abovementioned) became the king of all the three kingdoms of whole Kalmar Union. The House of Mecklenburg was its chief competitor regarding the Northern thrones, and other aspirants included, e.g., the Duke of Lauenburg. Different Oldenburgine branches have reigned in several countries, as this selective chart shows:

See also

External links

House of Oldenburg
(main line)
Preceded by
Pfalz-Neumarkt
King of Denmark
1448–1863
Succeeded by
House of Glücksburg (cadet branch)
Preceded by
House of Bonde
King of Norway
1450–1814
Succeeded by
House of Holstein-Gottorp (Swedish line) (cadet branch)
Vacant
Title last held by
House of Bonde
King of Sweden
1457–1464
Vacant
Title next held by
House of Bonde
Preceded by
House of Schaumburg
Duke of Schleswig
1460–1474
Succeeded by
House of Oldenburg, (as Dukes of Schleswig and Holstein)
Count of Holstein
1460–1474
Preceded by
House of Schaumburg
Duke of Schleswig and Holstein
1474–1544
Succeeded by
House of Oldenburg, (as Dukes of Schleswig and Holstein)
Succeeded by
House of Holstein-Gottorp (cadet branch), (as Dukes of Holstein-Gottorp)
Vacant
Title last held by
House of Bonde
King of Sweden
1497–1501
Vacant
Title next held by
House of Oldenburg
Preceded by
House of Oldenburg, (as Dukes of Schleswig and Counts of Holstein)
Duke of Schleswig and Holstein
1544–1864
Duchies annexed and made parts of Prussia in 1866
Vacant
Title last held by
House of Oldenburg
King of Sweden
1520–1521
Vacant
Title next held by
House of Vasa
Vacant
Title last held by
House of Hanover
Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg
1814–1864
Vacant
Title next held by
House of Hohenzollern
(1865 pers. union, 1876 real union with Prussia)

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