The Full Wiki

More info on Human rights in Chad

Human rights in Chad: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Human rights in Chad have been described as "poor"; for example, Freedom House has designated the country as "Not Free."[1][2] Chad received a score of 6 for both political rights and civil liberties (with 1 being the most free, 7 being the least free).[2]

According to the U.S. State Department, "The government's poor human rights record deteriorated further during the year; security forces committed numerous serious human rights abuses." Among the abuses listed were extrajudicial killings, beatings, torture, and rape by security forces; limits on freedom of speech and the press and freedom of assembly; arbitrary arrest and detention; and widespread corruption.[1] Security forces commit these and other abuses with "near total" impunity.[1][3][4]

Amnesty International has reported that "The widespread insecurity in eastern Chad had particularly severe consequences for women, who suffered grave human rights abuses, including rape, during attacks on villages."[4] Women face widespread discrimination and violence. Female genital mutilation, while technically illegal, is still widely practiced.[2] Harassment of journalists and human rights activists has also been documented [4] as well as the use of child soldiers by Chadian security forces, by various human rights groups. [1][5][6]

Transparency International has ranked Chad as one of the most corrupt nations in the world. In 2007, it scored 1.8 out of 10 on the Corruption Perceptions Index (with 10 being the least corrupt). Only Tonga, Uzbekistan, Haiti, Iraq, Myanmar, and Somalia scored lower.[7] Critics of President Idriss Déby have accused him of cronyism and favoring his own tribe.[8] Deby's re-election in May 2006 - in which he won a third term - was boycotted by the opposition, who denounced the results as fraudulent.[9] The previous election, in 2001, was similarly viewed as fraudulent by the opposition parties, although a team of foreign observers said that polling had taken place "without major problems or intimidation".[10][11][12]

See also

External links

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Chad" Country Reports on Human Rights Practices 2006. United States Department of State. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c Chad (2007) Freedom House. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  3. ^ Chad: Events of 2006 Human Rights Watch. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c Annual Report: Chad Amnesty International. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  5. ^ "Chad: Government Keeps Children in Army Ranks" Human Rights Watch. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  6. ^ "Chad: Army Forcibly Recruiting Youths, Rights Group Says" allAfrica.com. Accessed on December 16, 2007
  7. ^ "Corruption Perceptions Index 2007" Transparency International. Accessed on December 16, 2007.
  8. ^ "'Isolated' Deby clings to power" BBC News. April 13, 2006. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  9. ^ Country profile: Chad BBC News. Last updated: August 28, 2007. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  10. ^ "Deby re-elected president of Chad" CNN. May 28, 2001. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  11. ^ "Deby claims Chad electoral victory" BBC News. May 28, 2001. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  12. ^ Background Note: Chad United States Department of State. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
Advertisements

Human rights in Chad have been described as "poor"; for example, Freedom House has designated the country as "Not Free."[1][2] Chad received a score of 6 for both political rights and civil liberties (with 1 being the most free, 7 being the least free).[2]

According to the U.S. State Department, "The government's poor human rights record deteriorated further during the year; security forces committed numerous serious human rights abuses." Among the abuses listed were extrajudicial killings, beatings, torture, and rape by security forces; limits on freedom of speech and the press and freedom of assembly; arbitrary arrest and detention; and widespread corruption.[1] Security forces commit these and other abuses with "near total" impunity.[1][3][4]

Amnesty International has reported that "The widespread insecurity in eastern Chad had particularly severe consequences for women, who suffered grave human rights abuses, including rape, during attacks on villages."[4] Women face widespread discrimination and violence. Female genital mutilation, while technically illegal, is still widely practiced.[2] Harassment of journalists and human rights activists has also been documented [4] as well as the use of child soldiers by Chadian security forces, by various human rights groups. [1][5][6]

Transparency International has ranked Chad as one of the most corrupt nations in the world. In 2007, it scored 1.8 out of 10 on the Corruption Perceptions Index (with 10 being the least corrupt). Only Tonga, Uzbekistan, Haiti, Iraq, Myanmar, and Somalia scored lower.[7] Critics of President Idriss Déby have accused him of cronyism and favoring his own tribe.[8] Deby's re-election in May 2006 - in which he won a third term - was boycotted by the opposition, who denounced the results as fraudulent.[9] The previous election, in 2001, was similarly viewed as fraudulent by the opposition parties, although a team of foreign observers said that polling had taken place "without major problems or intimidation".[10][11][12]

See also

Human rights portal

External links

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Chad" Country Reports on Human Rights Practices 2006. United States Department of State. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c Chad (2007) Freedom House. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  3. ^ Chad: Events of 2006 Human Rights Watch. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c Annual Report: Chad Amnesty International. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  5. ^ "Chad: Government Keeps Children in Army Ranks" Human Rights Watch. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  6. ^ "Chad: Army Forcibly Recruiting Youths, Rights Group Says" allAfrica.com. Accessed on December 16, 2007
  7. ^ "Corruption Perceptions Index 2007" Transparency International. Accessed on December 16, 2007.
  8. ^ "'Isolated' Deby clings to power" BBC News. April 13, 2006. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  9. ^ Country profile: Chad BBC News. Last updated: August 28, 2007. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  10. ^ "Deby re-elected president of Chad" CNN. May 28, 2001. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  11. ^ "Deby claims Chad electoral victory" BBC News. May 28, 2001. Accessed on September 4, 2007.
  12. ^ Background Note: Chad United States Department of State. Accessed on September 4, 2007.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message