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According to the U.S. Department of State's annual human rights report for 2004, Libya's authoritarian regime continued to have a poor record.

Some of the numerous and serious abuses on the part of the government include poor prison conditions, arbitrary arrest and detention, prisoners held incommunicado, and political prisoners held for many years without charge or trial. The judiciary is controlled by the state, and there is no right to a fair public trial. Libyans do not have the right to change their government. Fathi Eljahmi is a Libyan political prisoner who has received considerable attention in the west.

Freedom of speech, press, assembly, association, and religion are restricted. Independent human rights organizations are prohibited.

Domestic violence against women appears to be widespread, and there have been reports of trafficking in persons. Ethnic and tribal minorities suffer discrimination, and the state continues to restrict the labor rights of foreign workers.[1]

One issue is that of six foreign health workers (five Bulgarian nurses and one Palestinian doctor) who were accused of deliberately infecting 426 children with HIV-tainted blood in a hospital in 1999. On May 6, 2004, a Libyan court sentenced the workers to death.[citation needed] They were eventually freed in 2007, following European diplomatic mobilisation.

The government also constantly makes illegal land confiscations, taking away property from the ordinary citizen. Citizens receive little or no compensation for these land grabs which the government justifies as being road expansions and pipe space for the Great Manmade River.

In 2005 Freedom House rated political rights in Libya as "7" (1 representing the most free and 7 the least free rating), civil liberties as "7" and gave it the freedom rating of "Not Free".[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (6 March 2007). "Libya". US Department of State. http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2006/78858.htm. Retrieved 5 March 2010. 
  2. ^ "Freedom in the World 2006" (PDF). Freedom House. 2005-12-16. http://www.freedomhouse.org/uploads/pdf/Charts2006.pdf. Retrieved 2006-07-27. 
    See also Freedom in the World 2006, List of indices of freedom

External links

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Library of Congress Country Studies.

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According to the U.S. Department of State's annual human rights report for 2004, Libya's authoritarian regime continued to have a poor record.

Some of the numerous and serious abuses on the part of the government include poor prison conditions, arbitrary arrest and detention, prisoners held incommunicado, and political prisoners held for many years without charge or trial. The judiciary is controlled by the state, and there is no right to a fair public trial. Libyans do not have the right to change their government. Fathi Eljahmi is a Libyan political prisoner who has received considerable attention in the west.

Freedom of speech, press, assembly, association, and religion are restricted. Independent human rights organizations are prohibited.

Domestic violence against women appears to be widespread, and there have been reports of trafficking in persons. Ethnic and tribal minorities suffer discrimination, and the state continues to restrict the labor rights of foreign workers.[1]

One issue is that of six foreign health workers (five Bulgarian nurses and one Palestinian doctor) who were accused of deliberately infecting 426 children with HIV-tainted blood in a hospital in 1999. On May 6, 2004, a Libyan court sentenced the workers to death.[citation needed] They were eventually freed in 2007, following European diplomatic mobilisation.

The government also constantly makes illegal land confiscations, taking away property from the ordinary citizen. Citizens receive little or no compensation for these land grabs which the government justifies as being road expansions and pipe space for the Great Manmade River.

In 2005 Freedom House rated political rights in Libya as "7" (1 representing the most free and 7 the least free rating), civil liberties as "7" and gave it the freedom rating of "Not Free".[2]

See also

Human rights portal
Libya portal

References

  1. ^ Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (6 March 2007). "Libya". US Department of State. http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2006/78858.htm. Retrieved 5 March 2010. 
  2. ^ "Freedom in the World 2006" (PDF). Freedom House. 2005-12-16. http://www.freedomhouse.org/uploads/pdf/Charts2006.pdf. Retrieved 2006-07-27. 
    See also Freedom in the World 2006, List of indices of freedom

External links

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Library of Congress Country Studies.


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