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Human Rights in Mexico have been an issue for years. The problems include torture, police repression[1], sexual murder[2], and, more recently, news reporter assassinations.[3]

Contents

Sexual murder in Ciudad Juárez

Since 1992, hundreds of women of Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, have been sexually murdered. The death toll of serially related murders in Juárez is climbing past 400, and many women are simply missing according to local news articles[4]. The city of Juárez homicide-disappearance rate for women is 38 times higher than all of the homicides in common North American statistics[5].

Women and young girls from every occupation and age, especially girls on their way to school waiting for their bus in the morning and women working the second shift walking home before dawn from their factories' bus stops are quite vulnerable[6]. The most seriously threatened group is primarily 12 to 21 years of age due to a breakdown of the family according to Chihuahua Institute of the Woman[7]. Save Juarez Project Director, Stephen L. Rush, suspected in 2001 that the drug lords were running a prostitution ring and paying the police to dump the bodies, after working with police in July to set up a check point along the Camino Anapra road to the desert near where bodies were found[8]. In November of 2001, bodies were found across the street from the Association of Maquiladoras according to local newspapers [9]. Save Juarez closed operations in November 2005 after several unsuccessful attempts at safehouses and self-defense training[10].

See also

External links

References

  1. ^ Represión policial y paramilitar en Oaxaca; tres muertos y 23 heridos
  2. ^ Stephen L. Rush: Advocacy & Civil Rights
  3. ^ Americans Covering Mexico Drug Trade Face Assassination Threat
  4. ^ "Alza la voz por crimenes en Juárez", El Diario, July 20, 2000
  5. ^ "Homicides of Women: Periodical Audit", Chihuahua Institute of the Woman
  6. ^ Vicky Caraveo, Director, Chihuahua Institute of the Woman
  7. ^ Instituto Chihuahuense de la Mujer
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ Del Norte, El Mexicano
  10. ^ "Final Address", Stephen L. Rush
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Human Rights in Mexico have been an issue for years. The problems include torture, police repression[1], sexual murder[2], and, more recently, news reporter assassinations.[3]

Contents

Sexual murder in Ciudad Juárez

Since 1992, hundreds of women of Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, have been sexually murdered. The death toll of serially related murders in Juárez is climbing past 400, and many women are simply missing according to local news articles[4]. The city of Juárez homicide-disappearance rate for women is 38 times higher than all of the homicides in common North American statistics[5].

Women and young girls from every occupation and age, especially girls on their way to school waiting for their bus in the morning and women working the second shift walking home before dawn from their factories' bus stops are quite vulnerable[6]. The most seriously threatened group is primarily 12 to 21 years of age due to a breakdown of the family according to Chihuahua Institute of the Woman[7]. Save Juarez Project Director, Stephen L. Rush, suspected in 2001 that the drug lords were running a prostitution ring and paying the police to dump the bodies, after working with police in July to set up a check point along the Camino Anapra road to the desert near where bodies were found[8]. In November of 2001, bodies were found across the street from the Association of Maquiladoras according to local newspapers [9]. Save Juarez closed operations in November 2005 after several unsuccessful attempts at safehouses and self-defense training[10].

2010 UBISORT ambush at San Juan Copala

On 26th of April 2010 several human rights activists on their way to San Juan Copala, subject to a paramilitary blockade since January were ambushed by Ubisort -militia. Two were killed, and twelve are missing.[11]

See also

Human rights portal
Mexico portal

External links

References

  1. ^ Represión policial y paramilitar en Oaxaca; tres muertos y 23 heridos
  2. ^ Stephen L. Rush: Advocacy & Civil Rights
  3. ^ Americans Covering Mexico Drug Trade Face Assassination Threat
  4. ^ "Alza la voz por crimenes en Juárez", El Diario, July 20, 2000
  5. ^ "Homicides of Women: Periodical Audit", Chihuahua Institute of the Woman
  6. ^ Vicky Caraveo, Director, Chihuahua Institute of the Woman
  7. ^ Instituto Chihuahuense de la Mujer
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ Del Norte, El Mexicano
  10. ^ "Final Address", Stephen L. Rush
  11. ^ Rights activists killed in Mexico, Andrew Wander, 28th of April 2010, Al Jazeera, http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2010/04/201042812413686521.html (English)


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