Humulus: Wikis

  
  

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Hop
Common Hop plant (Humulus lupulus)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales
Family: Cannabaceae
Genus: Humulus
L.
Species

Humulus lupulus L.
Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc.
Humulus yunnanensis Hu

Humulus, (Hop) is a small genus of flowering plants native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The female flowers (often called "cones") of H. lupulus are known as hops, and are used as a culinary flavoring and stabilizer, especially in the brewing of beer. The hop is part of the family Cannabaceae, which also includes the genus Cannabis (hemp).

Contents

Description

Although frequently referred to as the hop "vine", it is technically a bine; unlike vines, which use tendrils, suckers, and other appendages for attaching themselves, bines have stout stems with stiff hairs to aid in climbing. It is a perennial herbaceous plant which sends up new shoots in early spring and dies back to the cold-hardy rhizome in autumn. Hop shoots grow very rapidly and at the peak of growth can grow 20 to 50 centimetres (8 to 20 in) per week. Hop bines climb by wrapping clockwise around anything within reach, and individual bines typically grow between 2 to 15 metres (7 to 50 ft) depending on what is available to grow on. The leaves are opposite, with a 7 to 12 cm (2.8 to 4.7 in) Petiole and a cordate-based, palmately lobed blade 12 to 25 cm (4.7 to 9.8 in) and broad; the edges are coarsely toothed. When the hop bines run out of material to climb, horizontal shoots sprout between the leaves of the main stem to form a network of stems wound round each other.

Male and female flowers of the hops plant develop on separate plants (dioecious). Female plants, which produce the hops flowers used in brewing beer, often are propagated vegetatively and grown in the absence of male plants. This prevents pollination and the development of viable seeds which are considered undesirable for brewing beer.[1]

Species

There are three species, one with five varieties:

  • Humulus japonicus (syn. H. scandens). Asian Hop. Leaves with 5–7 lobes. Eastern Asia.
  • Humulus lupulus. Common Hop. Leaves with 3–5 lobes. Europe, western Asia, North America.
    • Humulus lupulus var. lupulus. Europe, western Asia.
    • Humulus lupulus var. cordifolius. Eastern Asia.
    • Humulus lupulus var. lupuloides (syn. H. americanus). Eastern North America.
    • Humulus lupulus var. neomexicanus. Western North America.
    • Humulus lupulus var. pubescens. Midwest North America.
  • Humulus yunnanensis. Yunnan Hop. Leaves with 3–5 lobes, densely hairy below. Southeast Asia (endemic in Yunnan, China).

Brewers' hops are specific cultivars, propagated by asexual reproduction: see List of hop varieties.

Hop varieties

References

  • Lee W. Janson, Ph. D.; Brew Chem 101; Storey Publishing; ISBN 0-88266-940-0 (paperback, 1996)

External links


Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Taxonavigation

Classification System: APG II (down to family level)

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Regnum: Plantae
Cladus: Angiospermae
Cladus: Eudicots
Cladus: core eudicots
Cladus: Rosids
Cladus: Eurosids I
Ordo: Rosales
Familia: Cannabaceae
Genus: Humulus
Species: H. lupulus

Vernacular names

English: Hop
Svenska: Humlen

Simple English

Hop
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales
Family: Cannabaceae
Genus: Humulus
L.
Species

Humulus lupulus L.
Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc.
Humulus yunnanensis Hu

Humulus (or hop) is a flowering plant. It is mostly found in the northern hemisphere. It's female flowers are often called cones. Hop is used in breweries for making beer.








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