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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ὕμνος εἰς τὴν Ἐλευθερίαν
English: Hymn to Liberty
Ýmnos is tin Eleftherían
National anthem of  Greece
 Cyprus
Lyrics Dionýsios Solomós, 1823
Music Nikolaos Mantzaros
Adopted 1865 by Greece
1960 by Cyprus
Music sample
Hymn to Liberty (Instrumental)

The Hymn to Liberty (Greek: Ὕμνος εἰς τὴν Ἐλευθερίαν, Ýmnos is tīn Eleftherian) is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas and is the longest Hymn in the world, set to music by Nikolaos Mantzaros. In 1865, the first two stanzas officially became the national anthem of Greece and later also that of the Republic of Cyprus. According to the Constitution of the Quintuplet of Cyprus, the Greek national anthem is used in the presence of the Greek Cypriot president (or other Greek Cypriot), and the Turkish national anthem is used in the presence of the Turkish Cypriot vice-president. Cyprus stopped using the Turkish national anthem, however, when Turkish Cypriots broke away from the Government in 1963. Hymn to Liberty was also the Greek Royal Anthem (since 1864).

The hymn was set to music in 1865 by the Corfiot operatic composer Nikolaos Mantzaros, who composed two choral versions, a long one for the whole poem and a short one for the first two stanzas; the latter is the one adopted as the National Anthem of Greece.

Contents

Lyrics

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Greek originals

Polytonic orthography

Σὲ γνωρίζω ἀπὸ τὴν κόψι
Τοῦ σπαθιοῦ τὴν τρομερή,
Σὲ γνωρίζω ἀπὸ τὴν ὄψι,
Ποῦ μὲ βιά μετράει τὴν γῆ.
Ἀπ’ τὰ κόκκαλα βγαλμένη
Τῶν Ἑλλήνων τὰ ἱερά,
Καὶ σὰν πρῶτα ἀνδρειωμένη,
Χαῖρε, ὢ χαῖρε, Ἐλευθεριά![1]

Monotonic orthography

Σε γνωρίζω από την κόψη
του σπαθιού την τρομερή,
σε γνωρίζω από την όψη
που με βιά μετράει την γη.
Απ’ τα κόκκαλα βγαλμένη
των Ελλήνων τα ιερά,
και σαν πρώτα ανδρειωμένη,
χαίρε, ω χαίρε, Ελευθεριά![1]

Transliteration

Se gnorízo apó tin kópsi
tou spathiú tin tromerí,
se gnorízo apó tin ópsi,
pu me vía metrái tin gi.
Ap' ta kókkala vgalméni
ton Ellínon ta ierá,
kai san próta andrioméni,
chére, o chére, Eleftheryá![1]

English Translations

Literal

I know it's you from the edge
of the sword, the terrible one
I recognize you from the look
which with hardness surveys the land
drawn from the bones
of the Greeks, the sacred ones
and, valiant as first
hail, o hail, Liberty!

Poetic

I shall always recognize you
by the dreadful sword you hold
as the Earth with searching vision
you survey with spirit bold
From the Greeks of old whose dying
brought to life and spirit free
now with ancient valour rising
let us hail you, oh Liberty!

By Rudyard Kipling (1918)

We knew thee of old,
O, divinely restored,
By the lights of thine eyes,
And the light of thy Sword.
From the graves of our slain,
Shall thy valour prevail,
As we greet thee again,
Hail, Liberty! Hail!

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Last two verses are repeated 3 times in the national anthem.

External links


Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Hymn to Liberty
by Dionysios Solomos, translated by Rudyard Kipling
The Hymn to Liberty is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas, set to music by Nikolaos Mantzaros. In 1865, the first two stanzas officially became the Greek national anthem and later also that of the Republic of Cyprus. — Excerpted from Hymn to Liberty on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Rudyard Kipling created this seven-stanza English translation, which was first published in the Daily Telegraph on October 17, 1918.

See also other translations on Wikisource.

We knew thee of old,
     Oh, divinely restored,
By the light of thine eyes
     And the light of thy Sword.

From the graves of our slain
     Shall thy valour prevail
As we greet thee again —
     Hail, Liberty! Hail!

Long time didst thou dwell
     Mid the peoples that mourn,
Awaiting some voice
     That should bid thee return.

Ah, slow broke that day
     And no man dared call,
For the shadow of tyranny
     Lay over all:

And we saw thee sad-eyed,
     The tears on thy cheeks
While thy raiment was dyed
     In the blood of the Greeks.

Yet, behold now thy sons
     With impetuous breath
Go forth to the fight
     Seeking Freedom or Death.

From the graves of our slain
     Shall thy valour prevail
As we greet thee again —
     Hail, Liberty! Hail!

PD-icon.svg This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1936, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.


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