The Full Wiki

Ian Wallace (drummer): Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ian Wallace
Birth name Ian Russell Wallace
Born September 29, 1946(1946-09-29)
Bury, Lancashire, England U.K.
Died February 22, 2007 (aged 60)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Genres Rock, Pop, jazz
Occupations Musician
Instruments Drummer
Years active 1968 – 2007
Associated acts Yes, Big Sound, Nalle, Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, Neil Innes, King Crimson, Peter Frampton, Bob Dylan, Ry Cooder, Don Henley, Bonnie Raitt, Joe Walsh, Johnny Hallyday, Keith Emerson, Roy Orbison, Jackson Browne, Traveling Wilburys, Eric Clapton, Jon Anderson, Alvin Lee, Crosby, Stills and Nash, Brian Eno, Larry Coryell, Stevie Nicks, Lindsey Buckingham, Steve Marriott, Badger, Al Kooper, Tim Buckley, Lonnie Mack, Procol Harum, Warren Zevon, Peter Banks, The Crimson Jazz Trio

Ian Russell Wallace (29 September 1946 — 22 February 2007) was a rock and jazz drummer, best known as a member of progressive rock band, King Crimson from 1971-1972.

Contents

Early years

Wallace formed his first band, The Jaguars, at school, before going on to join The Warriors with Jon Anderson in his pre-Yes days. (Wallace later played with Yes once in November 1968 during Bill Bruford's hiatus from the band).

From The Warriors, Wallace went on to join Big Sound. In the 1960s, Big Sound worked in Denmark, Norway and Sweden as a backing band to Danish rock musician Nalle. The Big Sound and The Warriors had been mates, and had gigged together in the Storyville Club, Frankfurt, Cologne and Copenhagen. The Big Sound's drummer and bass player left, and Ian & The Warriors bass player Dave Foster joined the band. When the Big Sound split at the back end of 1967 during a tour of Norway, some members including Ian, moved to London to back other artists including Sandie Shaw, David Garrick, Marv Johnson and Lou Christie.

Prime years

Wallace later joined Vivian Stanshall's, Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, and then The World with Neil Innes before King Crimson. He appeared on the album, Islands in 1971, and on the live album, Earthbound in 1972, as well as a number of later archival releases. In May 1972, at the end of a U.S. tour, he and fellow Crimson members Mel Collins and Boz Burrell left the band and went to work for Alexis Korner's Snape.

Wallace subsequently worked with Peter Frampton in 1975. He was invited to join Bob Dylan's band in 1978 and accompanied Dylan during his tour of Japan. Wallace's heavy drum style was the driving force behind the pop-heavy album Street-Legal. Musician Rob Stoner later said "The man had a beat like a cop."[1]

Other notable work includes Ry Cooder in 1979 and Don Henley in the 1980s and 1990s. Wallace's studio and live credits also include Bonnie Raitt, Joe Walsh, Bob Dylan, Johnny Hallyday, Keith Emerson, Roy Orbison, Jackson Browne, the Traveling Wilburys, Eric Clapton, Jon Anderson, Alvin Lee, Crosby, Stills and Nash, the Quireboys, Brian Eno, Larry Coryell, Stevie Nicks, Lindsey Buckingham, Steve Marriott, Badger, Al Kooper, Tim Buckley, Lonnie Mack, Procol Harum (1993 tour), and Warren Zevon.

For a short time, Wallace formed The Teabags in Los Angeles with Peter Banks (formerly of Yes), Jackie Lomax (formerly of Badger), David Mansfield, Kim Gardner (also formerly of Badger) and Graham Bell.

Later years and death

In 2003, he joined the 21st Century Schizoid Band, again replacing former King Crimson drummer, Michael Giles and released his only solo album, Happiness With Minimal Side Effects. In 2005 he formed the Crimson Jazz Trio with Tim Landers on bass and Jody Nardone on piano. The Crimson Jazz Trio released King Crimson Songbook Volume One in November 2005. In June 2006, the Crimson Jazz Trio recorded King Crimson Songbook Volume Two, released in early 2009.

On 10 August 2006, Wallace was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. He chronicled his illness in his online blog in the hope his story would encourage others with similar symptoms to pursue treatment. He died, aged 60, with his wife, Marjorie Pomeroy, at his side.[2]

Selective Discography

Notes

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message