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An innuendo is, according to the Advanced Oxford Learner's Dictionary, "an indirect remark about somebody or something, usually suggesting something bad, mean or rude; the use of remarks like this: innuendoes about her private life or The song is full of sexual innuendo." The word is often used to express disapproval.[1]

An innuendo is a baseless invention of thoughts or ideas. It can also be a remark or question, typically disparaging (also called insinuation), that works obliquely by allusion. In the latter sense, the intention is often to insult or accuse someone in such a way that one's words, taken literally, are innocent.

The term sexual innuendo has acquired a specific meaning, namely that of a "risque" double entendre by playing on a possibly sexual interpretation of an otherwise innocent uttering.

Many television shows aimed at a younger audience frequently use innuendos as a way of attracting older viewers without offending their network's censorship. Shows such as Fairly odd Parents, Spongebob Squarepants, Rocko's Modern Life, Cow & Chicken, Ren & Stimpy and especially Animaniacs and Looney Tunes have been known to do this over the years. Also many prime time shows use an extensive amount of innuendo to the point it is rated TV PG/14 D for dialogue. Shows such as The Simpsons, Futurama, The Office, King of The Hill, Beavis and Butthead, Everybody Hates Chris, American Dad and especially Family Guy have done this.

Perhaps one of the most adroit manipulations of the inherent suppleness of language can be found in the ever-honeyed realm of Romantic Poetry. Many writers find innuendo to be an incredibly pleasurable experience, and their urges to create innuendo-laced pages build up until finally they gush forth a stream of innuendo which impregnates the text with naughtiness. Some authors have said they favor innuendo because it fills a void in their literature, and their readers often comment on how uplifting the innuendos are. Although different writers have their own, unique and often exotic techniques for engaging subtle sexual overtones (often heavily swayed by the peccadilloes of their cultures), the undisputed masters of both manual and oral tradition are the Japanese Haiku masters. The tight structure of traditional Haiku is quite restrictive and binding to long, drawn out notions of verbal foreplay, and yet through the delicate insertion of clever natural image, they are able to whet their readers' insatiable appetites for subjects often considered taboo.

Here, we see one of Basho's most spiritually arousing offerings. Pay close attention to the overflowing voluptuousness of the surging bucolic imagery that he employs to convey the delicate spice of his demure affection for his chaste mistress:

I think we would all like to have this sort of beautiful sentiment inside us.

Haiku is not the only form of poetic expression so deeply soaked with sexual innuendo, list poetry can make even the most suggestive literature turn flaccid in fright.

Because of this poem's double-ended simplicity, it manages to slide itself into a niche of warm, phallic, poetic mastery.

Certain shaggy dog stories also mount the plateau of high-brow innuendo, although they seem to last for long periods of time before coming to a conclusion, making them comparatively impotent, when put side-by-side with the fast, rocking undulations, and sudden thrusts of classical poetry.

Gershon Legman's Rationale of the Dirty Joke: An Analysis of Sexual Humor (New York: Grove Press, 1968) describes the whole thing as a stunt thought up by bored reporters. [1]

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Innuendo"

References

  1. ^ Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (7th Edition; electronic version)

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

INNUENDO (Latin for "by nodding," from innuere, to indicate by nodding), an insinuation, suggestion, in prima facie innocent words, of something defamatory or disparaging of a person. The word appears in legal documents in Medieval Latin, to explain, in parenthesis, that to which a preceding word refers; thus, "he, innuendo, the plaintiff, is a thief." The word is still found in pleadings in actions for libel and slander. The innuendo, in the plaintiff's statement of claim, is an averment that words written or spoken by the defendant, though prima facie not actionable, have, in fact, a defamatory meaning, which is specifically set out (see Libel And Slander).


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Simple English

Not to be confused with Innuendo (album).
Simple English Wiktionary has the word meaning for:

An innuendo is an indirect or implied statement of ideas or opinions. It can also be a remark or question, often disparaging (also called insinuation), that works indirectly by allusion. In the latter sense, the intention is often to insult or accuse someone in such a way that the words as used, taken literally, seem to be innocent in the direct meaning (but have a negative unspoken meaning).

An innuendo is, as defined in the Advanced Oxford Learner's Dictionary, "an indirect remark about somebody's body, usually suggesting something bad, mean or rude; the use of remarks like this: innuendoes about her private life or The song is full of sexual innuendo." The word is often used to express disapproval.[1]

The term sexual innuendo has a specific meaning, namely that of a "risque" double entendre (a double meaning) by playing on a possibly sexual meaning of an otherwise innocent statement.

Many TV shows aimed at a younger audience often use innuendoes as a way of attracting older viewers without offending their network's censorship. Shows such as The FairlyOdd Parents, Spongebob Squarepants,The Penguins of Madagascar, Rocko's Modern Life, Cow & Chicken, Ren & Stimpy and especially Animaniacs and Looney Tunes have been known to do this over the years. Also many prime-time shows use an extensive amount of innuendo to the point that they are rated U.S. TV PG/14 D for dialogue. Some TV shows using innuendoes are: The Simpsons, Futurama, Son of the Beach, The Office, King of the Hill, Beavis and Butthead, Everybody Hates Chris, American Dad, Tosh.0 and especially Family Guy.

Also, many radio shows are known for use of innuendo, including: The Gallo Radio Show, most of the songs played on Southern Crossroads, sometimes The Rick & Bubba Show, The Steve and DC Morning Show, especially The JT & Dave Show, Air Bubba and The Bob & Tom Show.

References

  1. Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (7th Edition; electronic version)

Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 27, 2010

Unfortunately, we could not find any sentences from other sites similar to those above.








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