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IUPA
IUPA logo.png
International Union of Police Associations
Founded 1954
Country United States, Canada
Affiliation AFL-CIO
Key people Sam A. Cabral, President

Dennis Slocumb,Vice-President

Timothy A. Scott, Secretary-Treasurer
Office location Sarasota, Florida and Alexandria, Virginia
Website iupa.org

The International Union of Police Associations (IUPA or I.U.P.A.) is a North American trade union chartered for law enforcement, corrections and related support personnel. IUPA is a participant in the AFL-CIO federation of trade unions. IUPA was originally chartered as the National Conference of Police Associations (N.C.P.A.) in 1954. A split among member organizations over whether or not to join the AFL-CIO was led by Edward J Kiernan, the ICPA President to leave the ICPA and form the IUPA, which joined the AFL-CIO in 1979. Kiernan then served as the first IUPA President. The focus of IUPA expanded during the 1990s to include corrections personnel and organizations from Puerto Rico.

Contents

History

I.U.P.A.'s history began in 1954 when the union was known as the National Conference of Police Associations (N.C.P.A.). The N.C.P.A. was developed in response to the demands of the law enforcement profession that was changing so quickly, especially in the areas of collective bargaining and benefits. It was apparent that police officers were in need of the support and services that only the AFL-CIO could provide through the auspices of other police officers. In 1966, the N.C.P.A. amended its by-laws to allow a number of local Canadian police associations to affiliate and N.C.P.A. became known as the International Conference of Police Associations. The I.C.P.A. declined to ally itself with the AFL-CIO, so the member organizations that wanted AFL-CIO affiliation created the International Union of Police Associations (I.U.P.A.).

On February 20, 1979, the International Union of Police Associations was granted an AFL-CIO charter by President George Meany as the first law enforcement union that allowed the law enforcement community to have their own independent voice within organized labor. This partnership was created to enhance the working and personal lives of law enforcement professionals across the country.

Since 1990, I.U.P.A.'s membership growth has been threefold and has expanded to include corrections officers and public service employees. More recently, membership growth has been due to organizing campaigns that have been specifically designed for law enforcement personnel. I.U.P.A. now represent officers from Los Angeles to Boston, Minnesota to Florida, and across the Mid-West.

Also contributing to membership growth has been the realization that ever-changing laws and demands on the law enforcement community have created a significant need for officers to be covered legally while on the job. In response to this need, I.U.P.A. created a full service legal program that was tailored to offer representation in matters related to grievance and disciplinary hearings, collective bargaining, job security and contract administration and any other legal ramifications related to the course and scope of duty.

Since I.U.P.A.'s beginning, the organization has become one of the most influential voices for law enforcement in the political arena. We have always aided in drafting legislation impacting the lives of not only our membership, but the law enforcement and labor community as a whole. Our legislative initiatives include the National Police Officers Bill of Rights, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) for public employees, educational survivor benefits and armor vest grants.

The I.U.P.A. played the pivotal role in the passage of amendments that made the Fair Labor Standards Act, one of the most important labor laws ever passed, applicable to law enforcement. In 1986, Congress passed a series of amendments to the FLSA, which forever changed American policing. No longer could law enforcement officers be required to work more than eight hours a day or 40 hours a week without compensation; and no longer did local unions and associations have to collectively bargain to ensure that overtime was paid at time and a half. The passage of the FLSA amendments demonstrated, clearly and unequivocally, the great value of an independent law enforcement and AFL-CIO-affiliated union. We also fought alongside the AFL-CIO in opposition to the rule changes to this act promulgated by the Department of Labor. This collaborative effort resulted in the passage of the Harkin Amendment through both houses of Congress on several occasions.

The International Union of Police Associations (also known as IUPA or I.U.P.A.) is a North American trade union chartered for law enforcement, corrections and related support personnel. IUPA is a participant in the AFL-CIO federation of trade unions. IUPA was originally chartered as the "National Conference of Police Associations" (N.C.P.A.) in 1954. In 1966 the organization's charter changed to include Canadian police associations, leading to a change of name to the "International Conference of Police Associations" (I.C.P.A.). A split among member organizations over whether or not to join the AFL-CIO was led by Edward J Kiernan, the ICPA President to leave the ICPA and form the IUPA, which joined the AFL-CIO in 1979. Kiernan, then served as the first IUPA President. The focus of IUPA expanded during the 1990s to include corrections personnel and organizations from Puerto Rico. In 2006 the FFP (Federation of Puerto Rico Policia) voted to disaffiate from the IUPA because it felt they were not being represented and that President Cabral had tried to force them to vote a board member from New York out of office.

IUPA is governed by a President, Vice-president and Board, the Board representing sixteen geographical regions that the organization covers. Fourteen of these regions are contained in the United States; one region includes Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and the [Caribbean]]which no longer has membership; and one region includes Canada (no members) and the states of New York, New Jersey and Alaska (No Members in Alaska). As of 2009, the President and Vice-president are Sam A. Cabral and Dennis Slocumb. IUPA currently advertise that they have 100,000 members in 172 local chapters across 32 US states, Locals but in fact only have about 28,000. In 2005 the Board of Directors voted to move it's headquarters to Sarasota Flordia so the President could be closer to his winter home. The union is now supported by telemarketing as the majority of it's reserves were spent on the move nearly $750,000. It was reported in the latest 990 (IRS Form) that the union was over $11,000. in the red for the last reporting period. One must note that IUPA has failed to file a LM-2 (Department of Labor Form required by law) since 1996


IUPA is governed by a President, Vice-President and Board, the Board representing sixteen geographical regions that the organization covers. Fourteen of these regions are contained in the United States; and one region includes Canada and the states of New York, New Jersey and Alaska.

Leadership

President

Sam A. Cabral was re-elected as the International President of I.U.P.A. in August of 2008. President Cabral began his law enforcement career with the Defiance, Ohio Police Department in 1965 and he retired in 1991 as a Detective Sergeant in charge of the Defiance Detective’s Bureau.

In 1988, Sam was elected as the International Vice President of I.U.P.A. In 1990, he was elected as the International Secretary-Treasurer. He has served as the International President of I.U.P.A. since 1995. As the International President, Cabral leads the only AFL-CIO chartered union that exclusively represents rank and file law enforcement officers, EMS workers, and corrections officers in the United States, Canada, U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico .

Sam’s law enforcement and labor background began when his peers elected him as the Chief Union Steward at Campbell Soup for four years before joining the police force. After joining the force, he affiliated the Defiance Police Officers with I.U.P.A. and became President of Local 166 in 1978.

His educational background includes attended Defiance College, University of Toledo and he earned his Criminal Justice Degree from Ohio State University. He has studied at the George Meany Center for Labor Studies in Washington, D.C. and is a 1978 graduate of the 113th Session of the National FBI Academy Associates.

President Cabral currently serves on the Executive Board of the National Law Enforcement Memorial Fund Association, Union Privilege’s Board of Directors, American Income Life’s Executive Board as well as various federal law enforcement task forces. In addition, he has been a member of the Elks Club for over 30 years.

President Cabral testified before the United States Congress promoting legislation designed to improve both law enforcement policy and the conditions under which police officers work. He has guided legislation that has directly, or indirectly, affected law enforcement officials, such as being appointed in 1994 to the Congressional Commission on Crime Control, responsible for developing the 1994 Omnibus Crime Bill.

Vice President

Dennis Slocumb was elected to the position of Executive Vice President in July 2000 and re-elected in 2008. He comes to the International from the Los Angeles County Professional Peace Officer Association (PPOA no longer members), which represents over 6,000 sworn and non-sworn law enforcement professionals. In his capacity as the I.U.P.A. Executive Vice President, Dennis serves as the principal I.U.P.A. legislative liaison to the United States Congress on federal legislation affecting law enforcement. He also chairs I.U.P.A.’s Constitution, Judicial, Rules and Legislative Committees. He is a thirty-two year veteran of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, where he worked a variety of assignments in patrol and detective units, including time with the Special Investigations unit, and attained the rank of Detective Lieutenant. In 1998, Dennis was elected to serve as the president of the PPOA.

In addition to his long and dedicated service with the Sheriff's Department, Dennis also served for four years in the United States Navy, including a tour aboard the USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) as an Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare Technician. He holds degrees from the University of California at Redlands and Compton Junior College.

Secretary-Treasurer

Timothy A. Scott was appointed International Secretary-Treasurer of The I.U.P.A. in January of 2006. Following his appointment, Tim took an early retirement from the State of Connecticut, Department of Consumer Protection’s Liquor Control Division where he was employed since 1995, leaving as a Supervising Agent, a title he held since 1996.

Tim was elected President of the Protective Services Employees Coalition (PSEC) in May of 2001, a position he held until his retirement. As President of the PSEC, Tim was a voting member of the State Employee Bargaining Agent Coalition, SEBAC, the body that negotiates pension and benefits for all state employees in Connecticut. Immediately prior to his election as PSEC President, Tim served as the Vice President of Legislative Affairs for the PSEC. In July 2002 Tim was elected Region 13 Vice President of the International Union of Police Associations.

His educational background includes attending Eastern Connecticut State University, and as the President of PSEC, Tim has studied at the George Meany Center for Labor Studies in Washington, D.C. Additionally, he has attended numerous seminars related to grievance and arbitration, labor relations and collective bargaining.

Tim also is a co-founder and former President of the Eastern Connecticut Homicide Survivors, a support group for family and friends of homicide victims. Some of the activities of the ECHS included annual candlelight vigils held during National Victims Rights Week and annual Legislative Forums used to promote the organization’s legislative agenda. Tim had an active part in the establishment of court based Victim Advocates, increased funding for sexual assault crisis centers, the establishment of a Victims Bill of Rights, tougher sentences for violent criminals and a workable death penalty in Connecticut.

Mission

From IUPA's website:

The International Union of Police Associations is the only AFL-CIO union chartered exclusively for law enforcement and law enforcement support personnel. The AFL-CIO affiliation places I.U.P.A. in a position of strength within the labor movement. While I.U.P.A.'s officers, active and retired law enforcement officers, fight to improve the lives of their brothers and sisters in law enforcement, I.U.P.A. works to improve legislation that protects and affects public safety officers, as well as representing the needs of law enforcement officers and support personnel, whether that be for better equipment, more staff or a fair wage.

"Speaking with one voice, Moving with one Purpose," I.U.P.A. supports law enforcement and corrections officers in addition to support personnel.

See also

External links


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