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International public opinion is largely opposed to the war in Afghanistan. A 47-nation global survey of public opinion conducted in June 2007 by the Pew Global Attitudes Project found considerable opposition to the U.S. and NATO military operations in Afghanistan. In only 2 out of the 47 countries was there a majority that favoured keeping military troops in Afghanistan - Israel (59%) and Kenya (60%). [1] On the other hand, in 41 of the 47 countries pluralities want U.S. and NATO military troops out of Afghanistan as soon as possible. [1] In 32 out of 47 countries clear majorities want U.S. and NATO military troops out of Afghanistan as soon as possible. Majorities in 7 out of 12 NATO member countries want troops withdrawn as soon as possible. [1][2 ]

The 24-nation Pew Global Attitudes survey in June 2008 again found that majorities or pluralities in 21 of 24 countries want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible. In only 3 out of the 24 countries - the U.S. (50%), Australia (60%), and Britain (48%) - did public opinion lean more toward keeping troops there until the situation has stabilized. [3] [4] Since then, public opinion in Australia and Britain has shifted, and the majority of Australians and Britons now also want their troops to be brought home from Afghanistan.[5 ] [6] [7] [8] Of the seven NATO countries in the survey, none showed a majority in favor of keeping U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan - only one, the U.S., came close to a majority (50%). Of the other six NATO countries, five had clear majorities of their population wanting U.S. and NATO troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible. [4]

The 25-nation Pew Global Attitudes survey in June 2009 continued to find that the war in Afghanistan is unpopular in most nations [9] and that most publics want American and NATO troops out of Afghanistan. [10] The 2009 global survey reported that majorities or pluralities in 18 out of 25 countries want U.S. and NATO to remove their military troops from Afghanistan as soon as possible. [9] (Changes from 2008 included Tanzania, South Africa, and Australia having been replaced by Israel, Kenya, the Palestinian Territories, and Canada in the survey, and shifts in opinions in India and Nigeria.) In only 4 out of 25 countries was there a majority that favoured keeping U.S. and NATO military troops in Afghanistan - the U.S. (57%), Israel (59%), Kenya (56%), and Nigeria (52%). [9] Despite American calls for NATO allies to send more troops to Afghanistan, there was majority or plurality opposition to such action in every one of the NATO countries surveyed: Germany (63% disapprove), France (62%), Poland (57%), Canada (55%), Britain (51%), Spain (50%), and Turkey (49%). [11]

In Europe, poll after poll in France, Germany and even Britain show that the European public want their troops to be pulled out and less money spent on the war in Afghanistan. [7][12][13] [14]

Contents

2010

  • January 2010 - Germany: A new record number of Germans want their country to pull its military from Afghanistan immediately. The majority 71% of Germans want their country's troops withdrawn from Afghanistan "as soon as possible", and only a minority 27% support the military involvement in Afghanistan. An overwhelming 83% of Germans oppose their government sending any more troops to Afghanistan. The ARD/Infratest poll was conducted January 4–5, 2010. On January 6, 2010, U.S. Special Envoy to Afghanistan Richard Holbrooke again pressured Germany to send more troops, while German Defence Minister Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg announced that a decision would be made by the end of the month, but warned that it was likely to disappoint the United States.[15][16][17][18]

2009

  • December 2009 - Spain: Nearly half of all Spaniards oppose their government's decision to send another 500 more troops to Afghanistan. The plurality 48% of Spaniards consider their government's decision to be "bad" or "very bad", while only 22% considered it to be "good" or "very good". Another 26% consider the decision "normal" among the choice of responses available to them in the poll. The El Mundo poll was conducted Dec. 23-29, 2009.[19][20]
  • December 2009 - United States: The majority 58% of Americans feel less confident that the war in Afghanistan will come to a successful conclusion, while only 30% feel more confident. The majority 56% of Americans think it is unlikely that U.S. troops will begin to withdraw from Afghanistan in 18 months - as announced by the U.S. president - while only 39% think it is likely. In a statistical tie within the poll's 3.1% margin of error, 55% of Americans support increasing troops levels in Afghanistan, while 49% oppose sending more troops. Also in a statistical tie within the poll's 3.1% margin of error, 44% think the U.S. president's plan is the right approach, while 41% think it is the wrong approach. The NBC / Wall Street Journal poll was conducted Dec. 11-14, 2009.[21]
  • December 2009 - United States: The majority 56% of Americans continue to oppose sending more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while just 42% favor it, compared to 54% opposition and 43% support in November, despite the U.S. president's early December announcement of sending another 30,000 U.S. troops to the war. The majority 57% of Americans also continue to oppose the war in Afghanistan, while only 39% support it, unchanged from November despite the president's speech. The AP-GfK poll was conducted Dec. 10-14, 2009. [22] [23]
  • December 2009 - France: The overwhelming 82% majority of the French people are opposed to their government sending more French troops to Afghanistan, while only 17% support doing so. The U.S. has asked France to send 1,500 more troops to the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan. The Ifop / Sud-Ouest Dimanche poll was conducted Dec. 3-4, 2009.[24][25][26][27]
  • December 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 56% of Britons remain opposed to their country's involvement in military operations in Afghanistan, while only 36% support it. The majority 56% of Britons also oppose their prime minister's plan to send an additional 500 British soldiers to Afghanistan in the next few weeks, while only 35% support it. The Angus Reid poll was conducted Dec. 2-4, 2009.[28]
  • December 2009 - United States: Americans are split on sending 30,000 more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, the figure that was just announced by U.S. President Obama: 36% of Americans think the number is too high, 38% think number is about right, while only 18% think it is too low. 47% of Americans agree with setting a timetable to begin withdrawing some troops, while 46% think it is too soon to set one. 21% agree with the announced timetable to begin withdrawing some troops in 2011, while 26% think the U.S. "should start withdrawing troops sooner" than that. The majority 69% of Democrats agree with setting a timetable for beginning to withdraw some troops, with 27% agreeing with the announced timetable of 2011 and 35% wanting a withdrawal of troops to begin before 2011 arrives. On the other hand, the majority 72% of Republicans think it is too soon to set a timetable. 43% of Democrats think the number of new troops being sent to Afghanistan is too high, while 35% of Republicans feel it is too low. The USA Today / Gallup poll was conducted December 2, 2009 just after U.S. President Obama announced that 30,000 more U.S. troops would be sent to Afghanistan while setting a timetable that calls for the U.S. to begin withdrawing some unspecified number of troops in 2011. [29]
  • December 2009 - Canada: The majority 66% of Canadians oppose sending any more troops to Afghanistan despite the recently reported plans by the United States and Britain to do so. Only 28% would support sending any more troops. The majority 53% of Canadians also continue to oppose their country's involvement in military operations in Afghanistan, while 42% support it. The Angus Reid poll was conducted Dec. 1-2, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of Canadian soldiers killed in the war stood at 133.[30]
  • December 2009 - United States: 49% of Americans support the U.S. military operation in Afghanistan, down 5 points from October, while 42% of Americans oppose it, up 7 points from October. 47% support President Obama's plan, while 40% oppose it. Only 22% of Americans think a clear U.S. military victory is likely, while 37% of Americans think a negotiated settlement that gives the Taliban some role in the Afghan government is likely. The majority 56% of Americans are not confident that the Obama administration will be able to "finish the job" in Afghanistan, while only 31% are. The Angus Reid poll was conducted December 1–2, 2009 just after U.S. President Obama announced that 30,000 more U.S. troops would be sent to Afghanistan.[31]
  • December 2009 - Germany: The majority 69% of Germans want a full withdrawal of German troops from Afghanistan, while only 27% disagreed. Despite this, on Dec. 3, 2009, the German government approved the extension of the military mission for one more year. The Infratest-Dimap/ARD poll was conducted Nov. 30 - Dec. 1, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of German soldiers killed in the war stood at 31.[32]
  • November 2009 - Germany: The majority 65% of Germans oppose their country's military presence in Afghanistan and want their troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan before the next federal election in 2013, while only 29% disagreed. The Bild am Sontag / Emnid poll was conducted Nov. 27, 2009.[33][34][35]
  • November 2009 - United States: 48% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 47% support sending more troops. The plurality 39% of Americans want to begin to reduce the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. The majority 67% of Democrats oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, and the majority 57% of Democrats want to begin to reduce the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. In contrast, the majority 72% of Republicans want to send more U.S. soldiers to Afghanistan. The USA Today / Gallup poll was conducted November 20–22, 2009.[36]
  • November 2009 - United States: The majority 59% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, with the plurality 39% of Americans calling for a decrease of the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan and 20% saying the number should remain unchanged. Only 32% of Americans support sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan. The majority 53% of Americans think that a troop increase would not make the situation better in Afghanistan, while 36% think that it would. The majority 69% of Americans now think that the war in Afghanistan is going badly for the United States, a sharp increase from 53% in September and the highest level since the poll question was first asked in 2003. A minority 23% still believe that the war is going well for the United States, down 12 points from September and the lowest level since 2003. The change in view occurred in particular among Republicans: In September, 47% of Republicans believed the war was going well for the United States. In November, the figure dropped to 27%. The CBS News poll was conducted Nov. 13-16, 2009. [37]
  • November 2009 - United States: In continued growing U.S. opposition to the war in Afghanistan, the majority 52% of Americans now say the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, a new high in opposition for the poll question first asked in 2007, while only 44% say it is worth fighting, a new low in support. The majority 76% of Americans do not feel that withdrawing from Afghanistan would increase the risk of terrorism in the U.S. while only 23% feel that it would. The majority 58% are not confident that the current Afghan government will be able to train an Afghan army that can effectively take over security there "at some point", while 38% are. In politically asymmetrical views, the majority 66% of Democrats say the war is not worth fighting, while, on the other hand, the majority 60% of Republicans say that it is worth fighting. Nearly half of Democrats, 48%, feel strongly that the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, while 43% of Republicans feel strongly that it is. The ABC News / Washington Post poll was conducted November 12–15, 2009. [38] [39][40 ] [41] [42]
  • November 2009 - United Kingdom: The large 71% majority of British voters want their troops out of Afghanistan within a year. Seven out of 10 Britons want a phased withdrawal leading to an end of combat operations with 12 months, while only 22% disagreed. Almost half, 47%, of Britons say their country's continued military participation in Afghanistan makes terrorism more likely at home, while 44% say it does not. The ComRes poll for the Independent was conducted Nov. 11-12, 2009. At the time of the poll, the British death toll for personnel in the war in Afghanistan stood at 232.[43][44][45][46]
  • November 2009 - United States: The majority 57% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, while 39% favor it. The plurality 37% of Americans "strongly oppose" the war in Afghanistan, while only 15% "strongly favor" it. The majority 54% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, up from 50% the previous month, while 43% favor doing so, down from 46% the previous month. The plurality 38% of Americans "strongly oppose" sending any more troops. The Associated Press - GfK poll was conducted November 5–9, 2009. [47] [48]
  • November 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority of Britons reject the main justification given to them by the British government to justify its military presence in Afghanistan. Four out of five Britons do not believe that British military involvement in Afghanistan keeps the streets of Britain safe from terrorist attacks, and only 21% accept the government's claim. In fact, in direct contradiction to the government's position, almost half, 46%, of Britons feel that the British military participation in the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan actually increases the threat of attack in Britain. The GFK NOP poll for the Independent was conducted Nov. 7-8, 2009. At the time of the poll, the British death toll for personnel in the war in Afghanistan stood at 232.[49][50][51]
  • November 2009 - United States: The majority 51% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan: The plurality 44% of Americans want the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be reduced, and 7% want the number to be kept unchanged. 7% want an increase of less than 40,000, while 35% support an increase of 40,000 troops. The majority 60% of Democrats want President Obama to begin reducing troop levels in Afghanistan. The Gallup poll was conducted November 5–8, 2009. [52] [53] [54]
  • November 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 63% of Britons want "all" their troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan "as quickly as possible". Only 31% disagreed. The majority 64% of Britons also said the war in Afghanistan is unwinnable, while only 27 disagreed. The majority 52% said the levels of corruption involved in the recent presidential election demonstrated that the war in Afghanistan is "not worth fighting for", while 36% disagreed. The majority 54% of respondents felt they had a good understanding of the purpose of the military presence in Afghanistan, while 42% disagreed. The BBC/ComRes poll was conducted November 4–5, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 229.[55][56][57 ]
  • November 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 73% of Britons want their troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan immediately or within the next year or so: 35% of Britons want British troops brought home "immediately" and 38% said "most troops should be withdrawn soon, and the rest within the next year or so." Only 1 in 5 people, 20%, thought the UK military force should remain in Afghanistan. An overwhelming majority of the UK public, 85%, believe British troops are currently losing the war in Afghanistan: The majority 57% believe that military victory in Afghanistan is not possible, 28% thought eventual victory was possible, and 5% believed British troops were winning. The Channel 4 News / YouGov poll was conducted November 4–5, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 229.[57 ][58][59]
  • November 2009 - United States: The majority 58% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, while 40% support it. The majority 56% of Americans also oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 42% favor doing so. The majority 64% of Americans do not think that there will "eventually" be "a stable democratic government in Afghanistan that can maintain order in the country without assistance from U.S. troops." Only 32% of Americans think this will eventually occur. The CNN / Opinion Research poll was conducted Oct. 30 - Nov. 1, 2009. [60] [61]
  • November 2009 - United States: The majority 59% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to the war in Afghanistan: The plurality 40% of Americans want the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be reduced, and 19% want the number of troops to remain unchanged. Only 32% support a troop increase. The majority 57% of Americans think the military effort is not going well, while 36% believe it is. The Pew Research poll was conducted Oct. 28 - Nov. 8, 2009. [62]
  • October 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 62% of Britons want their troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan immediately or within the next year or so: 25% of Britons want British troops brought home "immediately" and 37% said "most troops should be withdrawn soon, and the rest within the next year or so." Only 29% thought the UK military force should remain past the next year. An overwhelming majority of the UK public, 84%, believe British troops are currently losing the war in Afghanistan: Almost half of the UK public, a plurality of 48% believe that military victory in Afghanistan is not possible, 36% thought eventual victory was possible, and 6% believed British troops were winning. The poll was released as thousands of people marched through the streets of London to call on the Gordon Brown government to change its policy that is at odds with the public sentiment and bring the 9,000-strong British force in Afghanistan home. The Channel 4 News / YouGov poll was conducted October 22–23, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 222.[63][64]
  • October 2009 - United States: The majority 59% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 39% support doing so. 49% of Americans call for a partial or complete withdrawal of U.S. troops in Afghanistan: 28% want their country to withdraw all U.S. troops, 21% want a reduction of U.S. troops, and 8% think the numbers should stay as they are. The majority 52% of Americans think the eight year long war has turned into a situation like the Vietnam War, while 46% do not. More than two-thirds of Americans say it's unlikely that Afghanistan will have stable government in the next few years. Six in 10 think it's necessary to keep U.S. forces in Afghanistan "now" to "prevent additional acts of terrorism in the U.S.", while 39% do not. The CNN - Opinion Research poll was conducted October 16–18, 2009. In this poll, CNN did not ask, or did not publish results for, the question ""Do you favor or oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan?" that it had asked in 10 previous polls. [65][66] [67] [68]
  • October 2009 - United States: 49% of Americans feel the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, while 47% do. 49% of Americans feel that Obama should not order the additional troops requested by U.S. military commanders, while 47% do. The majority 60% of Democrats oppose sending any more troops to Afghanistan, while the majority 69% of Republicans favor sending more troops there. Only 36% of Democrats feel the war is worth fighting, while 71% of Republicans do. The ABC News - Washington Post poll was conducted October 15–18, 2009. [69][70 ] [71]
  • October 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 68% of Britons want their troops withdrawn from Afghanistan "now" or "within the next year or so". The plurality 36% of Britons want their troops "withdrawn from Afghanistan now", while 32% of Britons want a firm timetable set for "withdrawing British troops within the next year or so" that should be adhered to "regardless of the situation in Afghanistan at the time". Only 27% think British troops should remain until the Taleban is defeated and the situation is stable. The percentage of Britons wanting an immediate withdrawal rose 7 points from 29% to 36% from mid-September. The Populus / Times poll was conducted October 9–11, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 221.[57 ][72][73][74]
  • October 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 59% of Britons oppose their country's military involvement in Afghanistan, an increase of opposition from 53% in July. 35% support the military involvement, a drop in support from 39% in July. The Angus Reid poll was conducted October 5–10, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 221. [75]
  • October 2009 - Canada: The majority 56% of Canadians oppose their country's military involvement in Afghanistan, an increase of opposition from 52% in July. 37% support the military involvement, a drop in support from 43% in July. The Angus Reid poll was conducted October 5–10, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of Canadian soldiers killed in the war stood at 131. [75]
  • October 2009 - United States: The majority 54% of Americans support their country's military involvement in Afghanistan, down slightly from 55% in July. 35% oppose the military involvement, unchanged from July. The Angus Reid poll was conducted October 5–10, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of American soldiers killed in the war stood at 869. [75]
  • October 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 63% of Britons think their troops in Afghanistan are "fighting a war that can't be won," while only 27% think it is "a war that must be won." 45% of Britons disagree that the war is worthwhile "to defeat terrorism," while 44% agree that it is. 44% of Britons disagree that troops in Afghanistan make them safer in Britain, while 42% agree that they do. The Sun / YouGov poll was conducted October 8–9, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 221.[57 ][76]
  • October 2009 - Australia: 51% of Australians do not want their country to continue to be involved militarily in Afghanistan, while 46% do. 52% of Australians are not confident that Australia has clear aims in Afghanistan, while 47% were. At the time of the poll, the number of Australian soldiers killed in Afghanistan stood at 11. The Lowy Institute poll was conducted July 13–25, 2009 but only released October 13, 2009.[77][78]
  • October 2009 - United States: The majority 56% of Americans say they want the size of the American military presence in the country to stay the same or be reduced. 38% of Americans favor drawing down U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan, while 37% favor increasing the number, a statistical tie within the poll's margin of error of ±3 points. 17% favor keeping troop levels the same. The majority 52% of Democrats want to decrease the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, while the majority 57% of Republicans want to increase the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Only 27% of Democrats support sending more troops to Afghanistan. According to the poll, 51% of Americans think the U.S is doing the right thing in fighting the war in Afghanistan, while 39% think the U.S. is not doing the right thing: The majority 76% of Republicans think the U.S. is doing the right thing by fighting the war, while, on the other hand, the plurality 49% of Democrats think the U.S. should not be involved in Afghanistan. The CBS News poll was conducted October 5–8, 2009.[79] [80]
  • October 2009 - United States: 48% of Americans support sending more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 45% oppose sending any more troops, a statistical tie within the poll's margin of error of ±5 points. 38% of Americans want President Obama to begin to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan. Half, 50%, of Democrats, and 44% of independents, want President Obama to begin to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan. 59% of Democrats, and 50% of independents, oppose sending any more troops, while 73% of Republicans support sending more troops. The USA Today / Gallup poll was conducted October 6, 2009. [81] [82]
  • October 2009 - Japan: The plurality 48% of Japanese supported their government's decision to end their country's naval refueling mission in support of the U.S.-led military campaign in Afghanistan, while 37% opposed it. The Yomiuri poll was conducted October 2–4, 2009.[83]
  • October 2009 - United States: The majority 57% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, while 40% favor the war. Half, 50%, of Americans oppose sending more troops to Afghanistan, while 46% favor sending more troops. The plurality 34% of Americans "strongly oppose" sending more troops to Afghanistan. The majority 57% of Democrats oppose sending more troops to Afghanistan, while 69% of Republicans favor sending more troops there. 46% approve of the way Barack Obama is handling the situation in Afghanistan, while 41% disapprove. The AP-GfK poll was conducted October 1–5, 2009. [84][85][86 ]
  • October 2009 - United States: The majority 54% of Americans oppose an increase in troops: The plurality 40% of Americans want the U.S. to "decrease the number of troops in Afghanistan and begin to get out", 14% want to keep the number the same as there is now, while 38% would increase the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Over two-thirds, 68%, of Americans think the war in Afghanistan "will go on and on without a clear resolution", while only 20% think the United States will eventually win. The majority 55% think the war in Afghanistan has been unsuccessful, while 42% believe it has been successful. Only 17% of Democrats support sending more troops - The majority 61% of Democrats want to decrease U.S. troop numbers in Afghanistan and begin to get out. The Clarus Research poll was conducted October 1–4, 2009. [87]
  • October 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 56% of Britons oppose their country's military operations in Afghanistan, while only 37% support the operations. The BBC/ICM poll was conducted in October 2–4, 2009. At the time of the poll, the British death toll in Afghanistan stood at 219.[57 ][88][89][90][91]
  • September 2009 - United States: 60% of Americans oppose increasing the number of troops in Afghanistan: 40% favor an increase, 37% want the number of troops in Afghanistan to be reduced, and 23% think they should be kept the same. The majority 56% of Americans think the U.S. is not winning the war in Afghanistan, while only 10% think it is. 33% were not sure. The Economist / YouGov poll was conducted September 27–29, 2009.[92]
  • September 2009 - Canada: Canadians massively want their country to leave its combat role in Afghanistan. The 82% majority of Canadians want Canada to end its combat role and either focus on training and development only or bring the Canadian troops home as soon as possible: 45% of Canadians want Canada to end the combat role and "provide help in training and development only" and 37% of Canadians want their troops to just "leave Afghanistan as soon as possible". Only 12% thought Canadian troops should "stay in combat roles until the war is won", while 6% did not know or refused to answer. The Leger Marketing poll was conducted September 22–25, 2009.[93]
  • September 2009 - Netherlands: The majority 70% of Dutch oppose extending their country's military deployment in Afghanistan past 2010. Only 21% support continuing the mission after 2010. At the time of the poll, the number of Dutch soldiers killed in the war stood at 21. The Maurice de Hond poll was conducted September 24, 2009.[94]
  • September 2009 - United States: Nearly half of all Americans, 48%, oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan. 41% of Americans want to begin to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan, while 41% favor sending more troops. 7% think the number should be kept the same as it is. The majority 62% of Democrats oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, and, in fact, the majority 53% of Democrats want to begin to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan. On the other hand, the majority 63% of Republicans favor sending more troops to Afghanistan. Only 30% of Democrats support sending more U.S. troops. The USA Today/Gallup poll was conducted September 22–23, 2009. [95]
  • September 2009 - United States: The majority 59% of all Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan: The plurality one third, 32%, of Americans want a reduction of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, while 27% want the number to remain as it is. Only 29% support sending any additional U.S. troops. The majority 55% of Americans are only willing to have large numbers of U.S. troops remain in Afghanistan for no longer than 2 more years: The plurality 31% of Americans are only willing to have large numbers of U.S. troops remain in Afghanistan less than 1 year, and another 24% accept 1 or 2 years. Only 27% are willing to have large numbers of U.S. troops stay longer than 5 more years in Afghanistan. 51% think the war is going badly for the U.S., while 35% think it is going well. 47% of Americans think the U.S. is doing the right thing by fighting the war in Afghanistan, while 42% of Americans think the U.S. should not be involved in Afghanistan now. Over half, 56%, of Americans think the situation in Afghanistan is staying about the same, while 26% think it is getting worse, and 8% think it is getting better. 68% of Americans think the U.S. military actions in Afghanistan have not decreased the threat of terrorism in the U.S.: The majority 51% of Americans think the threat of terrorism against the U.S. has stayed about the same, 27% think that it has decreased, and 17% think that it has increased, as a result of the U.S. military actions in Afghanistan. 51% think the threat of terrorism to the United States would either stay the same or even decrease if the U.S. withdrew its troops from Afghanistan: 42% think it would stay about the same, 43% think it would increase, and 9% think it would decrease if the U.S. withdrew its troops. The New York Times/CBS News poll was conducted September 19–23, 2009.[96][97]
  • September 2009 - United States: Nearly 6 in 10 Americans, 59%, are less confident the war in Afghanitan will come to a successful conclusion. The majority 51% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 44% support doing so. The majority 55% of Americans do not think the U.S. should have an immediate and orderly withdrawal of all troops from Afghanistan, while 38% do think the U.S. should have an immediate and orderly withdrawal of all troops from Afghanistan. 43% think the U.S. should not devote time and troops to try building a strong, stable government in Afghanistan, while 47% feel the U.S. should help build a strong, stable government. The NBC News / Wall Street Journal poll was conducted September 17–20, 2009.[98][99]
  • September 2009 - Finland: About half of Finns say Finland should continue its peacekeeping role in Afghanistan. The majority 65% of Finns do not think furthering human rights and democracy in Afghanistan is likely, while only 25% were optimistic of the outcome. While 50% said Finland should not withdraw its peacekeeping troops charged with supporting provincial government security, 35% of Finns want them withdrawn from Afghanistan. 44% think the peacekeeping troops should remain as long as needed, while 27% want them withdrawn within a year. 16% had no opinion on the matter. The Helsingin Sanomat / Suomen Gallup poll was conducted September 14–15, 2009.[100][101][102]
  • September 2009 - United States: Just half, 50%, of Americans now say that U.S. and NATO troops should remain in Afghanistan "until the situation has stabilized.", a notable decline from 57% in June, while 43% of Americans want the U.S. and NATO to "remove their troops as soon as possible, an increase from 38% in June. The majority 56% of Democrats want to remove U.S. and NATO troops from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while, in contrast, 71% of Republicans favor keeping them there. By nearly two to one, 55% to 29%, Republicans thought the U.S. is making progress rather than losing ground in defeating the Taliban militarily. The Pew Research Center poll was conducted September 10–15, 2009. [103] [104] [105]
  • September 2009 - United States: The majority 55% of Americans are not confident that U.S. policies in Afghanistan will be successful, and only 14% are confident. The plurality 42% of Americans believe the situation is getting worse in Afghanistan, while 8% believe it is getting better. The plurality 42% of Americans see no difference between the situation for U.S. troops in Afghanistan and in Iraq, while 36% think the situation is worse in Afghanistan than in Iraq. The Harris poll was conducted September 8–15, 2009.[106]
  • September 2009 - United States: Growing American opposition to the war in Afghanistan reached an all-time high, while support for the U.S. war fell to an all-time low in September. A record majority 58% of Americans now oppose the war in Afghanistan, while only 39% support the U.S. war. Only 23% of Democrats and only 39% independents support the war, while a majority 62% of Republicans support the war. The majority 75% of Democrats oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan. The CNN - Opinion Research poll was conducted September 11–13, 2009. [68] [107]
  • September 2009 - Germany: The majority 54% of Germans oppose their country's military operations in Afghanistan, and only 44% support them. The majority 58% of Germans oppose any extension of the mission, and only 39% support one. The ZDF - Tagesspiegel poll was conducted September 11, 2009.[108][109]
  • September 2009 - Germany: The majority 55% of Germans want their troops brought home from the war in Afghanistan. The Forsa Institute poll was conducted September 10–11, 2009.[110][111]
  • September 2009 - United States: "Americans are broadly skeptical of President Obama's contention that the war in Afghanistan is necessary for the war against terrorism to be a success, and few see an increase in troops as the right thing to do." The plurality 42% of Americans want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Only 26% of Americans think more troops should be sent to Afghanistan. 28% think they should be kept "about the same". The majority 56% of Democrats want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. The plurality 41% of independents also want a reduction of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. The plurality 39% of Republicans want more troops to be sent to the war. 51% of Americans think the war is not worth fighting, while 46% think it is. Fewer than half of Americans think winning the war in Afghanistan is necessary to win the "war on terrorism", with about as many saying it is not. The majority 59% of Democrats think the "war on terrorism" can be a success without winning in Afghanistan, while the majority 66% of Republicans think the war in Afghanistan must be won to win the "war on terrorism". The Washington Post - ABC News poll was conducted September 10–12, 2009.[112 ] [113]
  • September 2009 - Germany: The majority 57% of Germans want the withdrawal of their troops "as soon as possible from Afghanistan", while only 37 do not. The ARD - Deutschlandtrend poll was conducted September 10, 2009.[108][114][115][116]
  • September 2009 - Italy: The majority 58% of Italians are against the war in Afghanistan and want their soldiers brought back, while 26% supported keeping the troops there. The remaining 16% did not know. The ISPO - Corriere della Sera poll was conducted in the second week of September, before the deaths of 6 Italian soldiers in a suicide bomb attack in Kabul on September 17, Italy's' deadliest day in the war to date.[117] At the time of the poll, Italy's death toll in the war stood at 15. [118]
  • September 2009 - Netherlands Only 37% of Dutch approve of their country's military deployment in Afghanistan. The poll by the defence ministry was reported in the news on September 8, 2009. The percentage of Dutch opposed to the military deployment was not given.[119]
  • August 2009 - United States: Growing opposition to the U.S. war in Afghanistan hit an all-time high in the United States. The majority 57% of Americans oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan, while only 42% support it. The CNN / Opinion Research poll was conducted August 28–31, 2009 shortly after the August 20, 2009 election in Afghanistan that was characterized by widespread lack of security and massive fraud, at the end of the two deadliest months for U.S. troops in the 8-year-long war. [67][120] [121] [122] [123]
  • August 2009 - United States: More Americans, 41%, want the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be reduced than the number, 25%, that support sending more U.S. troops to Afghanistan. Less than half, 48%, of Americans approve of President Obama's handling of Afghanistan, and 52% think things are going badly for the U.S. in Afghanistan. 37% believe things are going well. The CBS News poll was conducted Aug. 27-31, 2009, shortly after the August 20, 2009 Afghan election.[124]
  • August 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 62% of Britons oppose their country's troops remaining in Afghanistan, while only 26% were in favour. The Daily Telegraph / YouGov poll was conducted in August 2009.[125]
  • August 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 66% of Britons think their troops in Afghanistan are "fighting a war that can't be won", while only 24% thought they were "fighting a war that must be won". 50% of Britons disagree that the war is worthwhile "to defeat terrorism", while 39% agree that it is. 46% of Britons disagree that troops in Afghanistan make them safer in Britain, while 40% agree that they do. The Sun / YouGov poll was conducted August 28–29, 2009. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 207.[57 ][126]
  • August 2009 - United States: The majority of Americans oppose sending more U.S. combat troops to Afghanistan: 56% oppose sending more combat troops, while only 35% support doing so. A majority 54% of Americans think the U.S. is not winning the war in Afghanistan, while only 29% think it is. 66% of Democrats and 67% of independents oppose sending more combat troops. Only in one group was there a majority in favor of sending more combat troops to Afghanistan: 52% of Republicans. The McClatchy / Ipsos poll was conducted Aug. 27-31, 2009, shortly after the August 20, 2009 Afghan election. [127]
  • August 2009 - United States: The majority 59% of Americans think the "United States will withdraw from Afghanistan without winning", while 41% think the United States will win the war in Afghanistan. The majority 75% of Americans think U.S. troops will still be in Afghanistan in three years time, in 2012, while only 7% did not think so and 18% were not sure. The Economist / YouGov poll was conducted Aug. 23-25, 2009, shortly after the August 20, 2009 Afghan election.[128]
  • August 2009 - United Kingdom: More than half of Britons are against their country's military involvement in Afghanistan. 53% of the British public disagree with the British military deployment to Afghanistan, while only one in four, 25%, agree with it. Underlining the lack of support for the military operations in a foreign country and the British public's rejection of their government's justifications for the military presence, more than 70% of Britons said that the military's most important function should be to defend British territory and citizens. Support for other reasons given by the government was rock bottom: Only 2% of Britons thought their military should be involved in reconstruction of countries damaged by war; only 1% believed that their military should train and mentor foreign forces. The ICM Research / National Army Museum was conducted August 21–23, 2009, in the days after the August 20 Afghan election. At the time of the poll, the British death toll in Afghanistan stood at 206.[129][130][131]
  • August 2009 - United Kingdom: More than two-thirds of Britons want their country's troops pulled out of Afghanistan. The majority 69% of people in Britain think their troops should not be fighting in Afghanistan, while only 31% thought they should. Three-quarters of Britons do not think that fighting in Afghanistan is making them safer from terrorism as Gordon Brown and senior ministers had repeatedly been telling them recently. Nearly three-quarters, 72%, also said Gordon Brown was handling the war badly. At the time of the poll, the British death toll in the war in Afghanistan stood at 206, nearly 30 more than were killed in the 5-year British involvement in Iraq. The BPIX / Mail on Sunday poll was conducted August 20–21, 2009, at around the time of the August 20, 2009 Afghan election.[132][133]
  • August 2009 - United States: More than half of Americans, 51%, now say the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, while 47% think it is - a statistical tie within the poll's 3.5-point margin of error. Less than a quarter of Americans, 24%, favor sending more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while almost twice as many, 45%, want to see the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan reduced. More Americans, 41%, "strongly" think that the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, compared to 31% that "strongly" think that it is. The ABC News / Washington Post poll was conducted August 13–17, 2009, just ahead of the August 20, 2009 Afghan election. [134] [135]
  • August 2009 - France: The majority 64% in France oppose their country's military intervention in Afghanistan, while only 36% favour it. The Ifop / Le Figaro poll was conducted August 10–18, 2009 just ahead of the August 20, 2009 Afghan election. At the time of the poll, the number of French soldiers killed in the war in Afghanistan stood at 29.[136]
  • August 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 57% of Britons think their troops should not be fighting in Afghanistan, more than twice the number that think they should, 28%. Only 13% said it was "very clear" why their country was in Afghanistan. The YouGov / Sky News poll was conducted August 7–10, 2009. At the time the poll was released, the death toll of British soldiers in Afghanistan passed the 200 mark.[137][138][139][140][141]
  • August 2009 - United States: Most Americans now oppose the war in Afghanistan. In a new low in American public support for the war, 54% of Americans oppose the US-led war, while only 41% support it. Nearly two thirds of Republicans support the war in Afghanistan. Three quarters of Democrats oppose the war. [142] [143]
  • August 2009 - New Zealand: The majority 61% of New Zealanders agree with their government's decision to extend the non-combat stay of 140 troops working on reconstruction projects in Afghanistan, while 25% disagree, and 13% are unsure. On the other hand, New Zealanders are divided on whether to send SAS (Special Air Service) soldiers back to Afghanistan, following a request made by the United States. New Zealand has had up to 65 SAS (elite combat unit) soldiers in Afghanistan in the past, but none at the moment. 47% of respondents would support this measure, while 44% would oppose it, a statistical tie within the poll's 4.5% margin of error. The remaining 9% were unsure. [144][145]
  • August 2009 - Pakistan: The majority 80% of Pakistanis oppose their government's cooperation with the United States on its "war against terror", while only 18% support it. Washington had given close to $10.5 billion U.S. in military and economic aid to Pakistan since 2002, and the U.S. Congress had recently demanded that Pakistan demonstrate that it was fighting militants as a condition for receiving an additional $7.5 billion U.S. package over a five-year period.[146]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 77% of Britons feel that the cause of war in Afghanistan is not sufficiently worthwhile to risk the lives of British troops. Only 15% believe the cause is worth the loss of British soldiers' lives. 8% did not know.[147][148]
  • July 2009 - Italy: The majority 56% of Italians want their government to draft a plan to withdraw all Italian soldiers from Afghanistan either immediately or gradually. 22% of Italians want an immediate withdrawal of their troops from Afghanistan, while 34% think a gradual withdrawal would be better. Conversely, 37% oppose bringing their troops back. The remaining 7% had no opinion. At the time of the poll, the number of Italian troops killed in the war in Afghanistan stood at 15.. [144][149]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: More than half of Britons think military operations in Afghanistan are futile and want their troops to be withdrawn immediately. 58% of Britons see the war as "unwinnable" and only 31% disagree. A majority 52% of Britons want their country's troops out of Afghanistan immediately, while 43% want them to stay there. A majority 60% do not think any more troops or resources should be sent to Afghanistan, while only 35% support reinforcement. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war had reached 191, with 22 killed in the month to date alone.[150][151][152]
  • July 2009 - Netherlands: A staggering 74% of Dutch want their government to pull out all or at least most of their troops: 43% would keep a limited number of soldiers in Afghanistan, 31% would withdraw all soldiers from Afghanistan, 20% would maintain more or less the current role, and only 3% would extend the mission beyond 2010. The remaining 4% did not know. At the time of the poll, the number of Dutch troops killed in the war in Afghanistan stood at 19. [144][153]
  • July 2009 - United States: The majority 53% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, while 44% support it. The plurality of Americans, 34%, strongly oppose the war in Afghanistan, while only 20% strongly favor it. 19% somewhat oppose the war in Afghanistan and 20% somewhat favor it. 3% did not know or declined to answer. 66% of Republicans favor the war in Afghanistan, while only 26% of Democrats do.[154 ] [155] [156]
  • July 2009 - Finland: A majority 62% of Finns want Finnish troops, charged with supporting provincial government security, to remain in Afghanistan: 55% want the number of Finnish troops to remain steady, 18% want them withdrawn from Afghanistan, and 7% would increase their number. 48% of Finns say their troops should only serve in operations with minimal likelihood of combat. 45% said they should engage the enemy if necessary. Around the same time as the poll, in late July, Finnish troops, based north of Kabul, had just returned fire for the very first time in Afghanistan. At the time of the poll, Finland had about 195 troops in Afghanistan with one Finnish soldier having died in the war so far.[157][158]
  • July 2009 - Canada: The majority of Canadians oppose the military mission in Afghanistan. 52% of Canadians oppose the military operation, while only 43% support it. Only 38% of Canadians think their country did the right thing in sending military forces to Afghanistan. At the time of the poll, the number of Canadian soldiers killed in the war stood at 125. [159] [160]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority of Britons oppose the military mission in Afghanistan. 53% of Britons oppose the military operation, while only 39% support it. Only 28% of Britons think their country did the right thing in sending military forces to Afghanistan. The majority 53% think that their country made a mistake in sending military forces to Afghanistan. 43% of Britons would agree with the UK government actively negotiating with the Taliban, while 37% would disagree. At the time of the poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the war stood at 186. [159] [160]
  • July 2009 - United States: The majority of Americans support the military mission in Afghanistan. 55% of Americans support the military operation, while only 35% oppose it. Just under half, 49%, of Americans think their country did the right thing in sending military forces to Afghanistan. 48% of Americans also feel that they do not have a clear idea of what the war in Afghanistan is about. [159] [160]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: A majority 64% of Britons want all British forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan "as quickly as possible", while 33% do not. [161] [162] 60% of Britons disagree with devoting any more British troops or resources to Afghanistan, while only 34% would agree. [162]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: Over two-thirds of Britons believe that their country's troops should be withdrawn either now (34%) or within the next year (33%). Only 29% think their troops should stay there until the situation in Afghanistan becomes stable even if it takes many years.[163]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: 70% of Britons feel that the war in Afghanistan is not worth risking the lives of British troops. Only 24% of Britons feel that it is worth risking the lives of British soldiers for. [161][164] The remaining 6% did not know. Presented with a multiple choice question of what they think should happen: 14% think more British troops should be sent there; 36% feel other countries should send more troops but not Britain; only 9% think current troop levels should be maintained as long as necessary; 21% want Britain to withdraw all its troops from Afghanistan; and 12% think all western troops should be withdrawn from Afghanistan.[165][166]
  • July 2009 - Czech Republic: Half of Czechs do not want their country's soldiers in Afghanistan - 50% of Czechs disagree with the presence of Czech soldiers in Afghanistan, while the other half approve of it. Most Czechs prefer to see a focus mainly on humanitarian aid and reconstruction activity.[167]
  • July 2009 - United States: Half of Americans, 51%, think the war in Afghanistan is worth fighting, while nearly half, 45%, think the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting - a statistical tie within the poll's ±3 point margin of error.[168 ] [169] [170] Despite this, 62% of Americans approve of the way President Obama is handling the situation, while 30% do not. The American public remains closely divided on whether the United States is making significant process toward winning the war, with 46% thinking so and 42% not. [169]
  • July 2009 - United States: 36% of Americans think the U.S. involvement in Afghanistan is a mistake. On the other hand, 54% of Americans think things are going well for the U.S. in Afghanistan. 56% of Democrat Americans think the U.S. involvement in Afghanistan is a mistake, while 13% of Republican Americans think it is a mistake. In those identifying as independents, 39% think the U.S. involvement in Afghanistan is a mistake. [171] The poll took place before it was reported that July had become the deadliest month for U.S. troops in Afghanistan so far, and that the combined American death toll from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq had surpassed the 5,000 mark.[172]
  • July 2009 - Canada: A majority 54% of Canadians oppose their country's military participation in Afghanistan, while support has fallen to just one in three, at 34%. On the day the poll was released, the number of Canadian soldiers killed in the war reached 125.[173][174][175]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: Nearly three in five Britons, 59%, want their country's troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan, while only 36% think they should stay there.[176][177][178] [179]
  • July 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 56% of Britons want their troops brought home from Afghanistan within six months by the end of the year [180] [181]: The plurality 42% of Britons want the immediate withdrawal of British troops from Afghanistan, while a further 14% want them home by the end of 2009. Only 36% want the troops to stay in Afghanistan as long as needed. [179] [180][182] [183] Twice as many people think British troops are making no difference to the country, or even causing harm, than think they are doing good. [180] [181] 47% of Britons are opposed to their country's military operations in Afghanistan, while 46% support it.[184][185] In a previous ICM poll for the BBC in March 2008, 48% of Britons were opposed to their country's military operations, while 40% supported it.[186 ] At the time of the latest poll, the number of British soldiers killed in the Afghan war stood at 184. [180] [183] [187]
  • July 2009 - Germany: An over two-thirds majority of Germans, 69%, believe their country's military should leave Afghanistan as soon as possible. This is a 5% increase since April when 64% of Germans wanted their troops to pull out of Afghanistan as quickly as possible, and the highest figure yet from the poll on the issue.[188]
  • June 2009 - Germany: Two-thirds of Germans want their soldiers out of Afghanistan - and as soon as possible. Only one-third support the mission.[189][190]
  • June 2009 - Germany: A majority 61% of Germans believe the German military should withdraw from Afghanistan, while 33% thought they should stay there. The level of opposition to the deployment is up from 59% in a similar poll in September 2008, and 52% in September 2007. At the time of the poll, the number of German soldiers killed in the war since 2002 stood at 35.[191][192]
  • June 2009 - United States: The majority 62% of Americans want to maintain or increase U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan. The plurality of Americans, 32%, want U.S. troop numbers in Afghanistan kept at the current level. 19% want their troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan, and 11% want the number of their troops in Afghanistan to be reduced. 30% of Americans think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - United Kingdom: The majority 60% of Britons want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. The plurality of Britons, 41%, want British troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan. Another 19% want the number of British troops in Afghanistan reduced. 27% think the number of troops should remain the same. Only 11% of Britons think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Germany: The majority 57% of Germans want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. The plurality of Germans, 41%, want German troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan. Another 16% want the number of German troops in Afghanistan to be reduced. 35% think the number of troops should remain the same. Only 7% of Germans think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - France: The majority 51% of people in France want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. The plurality in France, 41%, want French troop numbers in Afghanistan kept at the current level. 34% want their troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan, and 17% want the number of their troops in Afghanistan to be reduced. Only 4% of people in France think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Italy: The majority 55% of Italians want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. The plurality of Italians, 38%, want Italian troop numbers in Afghanistan kept at the current level. 34% of Italians want their troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan, and 21% want the number of their troops in Afghanistan to be reduced. Only 6% of Italians think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Netherlands: Half, 50% of Dutch people want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. The plurality, 43%, want Dutch troop numbers in Afghanistan kept at the current level. 28% of Dutch people want their troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan, and 22% want the number of their troops in Afghanistan to be reduced. Only 5% of Dutch people think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Poland: The majority two-thirds, 68%, of Poles want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. Over half of Poles, 51%, want Polish troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan. Another 17% want the number of Polish troops in Afghanistan to be reduced. 22% think the number of troops should remain the same. Only 5% of Poles think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Portugal: The majority 52% of Portuguese want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. The plurality of Portuguese, 40%, want Portuguese troop numbers kept at the current level. 38% want their troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan. Another 14% want the number of Portuguese troops in Afghanistan to be reduced. Only 7% of Portuguese think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Spain: The majority 54% of Spaniards want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. 37% of Spaniards want Spanish troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan, and another 17% want their troop numbers in Afghanistan reduced. 37% want their troop numbers kept at the current level. Only 7% of Spaniards think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Slovakia: The majority 61% of Slovaks want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. 31% of Slovaks want Slovak troop numbers to be reduced, 31% want troop numbers kept at the current level, and 30% want their troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan. Only 2% of Slovaks think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Turkey: Half, 50% of Turks want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. The plurality of Turks, 30%, want Turkish troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan, and another 20% want their troops numbers to be reduced. 21% want troop numbers kept at the current level. Only 14% of Turks think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Bulgaria: The majority 72% of Bulgarians want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. Half of Bulgarians, 50%, want Bulgarian troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan. Another 22% want their troops numbers to be reduced. Only 14% want their troop numbers kept at the current level, and only 2% of Bulgarians think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - Romania: The majority 71% of Romanians want some or all of their country's military forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. Almost half of Romanians, 48%, want Romanian troops to be completely withdrawn from Afghanistan. Another 23% want their troops numbers to be reduced. Only 16% want their troop numbers kept at the current level, and only 5% of Romanians think their country should send more troops to Afghanistan. The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends survey 2009 was conducted June 9 - July 1, 2009. [193]
  • June 2009 - United States: The majority 57% of Americans want U.S. and NATO military troops to be kept in Afghanistan until the situation has stabilised, while 38% want them removed as soon as possible. [9] The majority 52% of Americans approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while 42% disapprove. [11]
  • June 2009 - Israel: The majority 59% of Israelis want U.S. and NATO military troops to be kept in Afghanistan until the situation has stabilised, while only 27% want them removed as soon as possible. [9] The majority 54% of Israelis approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while 32% disapprove. [11]
  • June 2009 - Canada: The majority 50% of Canadians want U.S. and NATO military troops to be removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 43% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 55% of Canadians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while 42% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Mexico: The majority 51% of Mexicans want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 22% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 52% of Mexicans disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 22% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Jordan: The majority 86% of Jordanians want U.S. and NATO military troops to be removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 12% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 66% of Jordanians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 11% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Brazil: The majority 56% of Brazilians want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 26% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 57% of Brazilians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 27% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Indonesia: The majority 66% of Indonesians want U.S. and NATO military troops to be removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 17% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 55% of Indonesians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while 42% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Russia: The majority 66% of Russians want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 16% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 66% of Russians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 13% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Egypt: The majority 70% of Egyptians want U.S. and NATO military troops to be removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 19% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 64% of Egyptians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 19% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - South Korea: The plurality 49% of South Koreans want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 38% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 55% of South Koreans disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 28% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Kenya: The majority 56% of Kenyans want U.S. and NATO military troops to be kept in Afghanistan until the situation has stabilised, while only 30% want them removed as soon as possible. [9] The majority 53% of Kenyans approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while 31% disapprove. [11]
  • June 2009 - Turkey: The majority 63% of Turks want U.S. and NATO military troops to be removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 15% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The plurality 49% of Turks disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 16% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Spain: 46% of Spaniards want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 44% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised - a statistical tie within the margin of error. [9] The majority 50% of Spaniards disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops there, while 41% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Pakistan: The majority 72% of Pakistanis want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 4% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 57% of Pakistanis disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 16% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - United Kingdom: 48% of Britons want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 46% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised - a statistical tie within the margin of error. [9] The majority 51% of Britons disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops there, while 41% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - India: A plurality 42% of Indians want U.S. and NATO military troops to be kept in Afghanistan until the situation has stabilised, while only 29% want them removed as soon as possible. [9] A plurality 38% of Indians approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 27% disapprove. [11]
  • June 2009 - Palestinian Territories: The majority 90% of Palestinians want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 5% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 84% of Palestinians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 12% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - China: The majority 70% of the Chinese want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 16% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 71% of the Chinese disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while 17% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - France: 49% of the French want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 50% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised - a statistical tie within the margin of error. [9] The majority 62% of the French disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops there, while 37% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Argentina: The majority 77% of Argentinians want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 6% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 67% of Argentinians disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 12% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Japan: The majority 51% of the Japanese want U.S. and NATO military troops to be removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 36% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 62% of Japanese disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 28% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Nigeria: The majority 52% of Nigerians want U.S. and NATO military troops to be kept in Afghanistan until the situation has stabilised, while 41% want them removed as soon as possible. [9] The plurality 49% of Nigerians approve of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while 44% disapprove. [11]
  • June 2009 - Germany: 47% of Germans want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 48% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised - a statistical tie within the margin of error. [9] The majority 63% of Germans disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops there, while 32% approve. [11]
  • June 2009 - Poland: The majority 57% of Poles want U.S. and NATO military troops removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 30% want them kept there until the situation has stabilised. [9] The majority 57% of Poles disapprove of U.S. President Obama sending additional troops to Afghanistan, while only 28% approve. [11]
  • May 2009 - Canada: Half of Canadians are adamant about ending the Afghan mission before 2011, and the vast majority of Canadians, 84%, want their country's military presence in Afghanistan to wane by 2011. 51% of Canadians want the bulk of the troops to be withdrawn before 2011. 33% think the bulk of the troops should be withdrawn in 2011. Only 7% would keep Canadian troops in Afghanistan past 2011. The majority of Canadians, 57%, continue to disagree with their government's latest extension from February 2009 to 2011. At the time of the poll, the number of Canadian soldiers killed in the war stood at 118.[194]
  • May 2009 - United States: Americans continue to be split over the war in Afghanistan with 50% in favor and 48% of Americans opposed in a poll with a margin of error of plus or minus 3%. Only 36% of Americans feel things are going well for the United States in the war, while 60% say things are going poorly.[195]
  • May 2009 - Australia: The plurality of Australians, 49%, oppose their government's announced increase of 450 more troops in Afghanistan, while 36% support the increase. At the time of the poll, the number of Australian soldiers killed in the war stood at 10.[196]
  • May 2009 - Canada: A majority 54% of Canadians continue to be opposed to their country having troops in Afghanistan, while 39% support it. Almost 90% of Canadians want their troops out of Afghanistan before or by the scheduled end date in 2011. 40% of Canadians want the troops brought back early while 46% say they should be withdrawn in July 2011. Only 8% think the mission should continue past July 2011. 54% do not think the additional increases in U.S. troops will succeed, while 41% do.[197]
  • April 2009 - Denmark: A majority of Danes support negotiating with the Taliban to achieve peace in Afghanistan, and 53% support their country's military participation there. 47% of Danes do not think the war in Afghanistan can be won, while 29% do. At the time of the poll, the number of Danish soldiers killed in the war stood at 23.[198][199]
  • April 2009 - Australia: Half of Australians would end their country's participation in the war in Afghanistan. 50% of Australians want their troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. Only 24% think the number of Australian troops in Afghanistan should be kept the same. Only a small minority, 14%, would support increasing the number of troops if asked by the United States. At the time of the poll, the number of Australian soldiers killed in the war stood at 10.[200]
  • April 2009 - United States: A majority of Americans, 53%, favor the war in Afghanistan. 46% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan. Despite this, more than two-thirds back the president's plan to send roughly 20,000 more U.S. troops, while 31% oppose those planned increases. A majority of Americans, 52%, however, would oppose sending even more U.S. troops than already announced, while 45% would support doing so.[201]
  • April 2009 - Netherlands: The majority of people in the Netherlands think their government should not comply with a request by the United States to extend the presence of Dutch soldiers in Afghanistan. 59% of Dutch citizens do not want their country's troops to stay in Afghanistan after 2010. Only 31% think they should stay after 2010 when the current mission is due to expire. At the time of the poll, the number of Dutch soldiers killed in the war in Afghanistan stood at 19.[202] In a separate report, a recent poll indicated that four out of 10 Dutch soldiers think the Netherlands should end its mission in Afghanistan.[203]
  • April 2009 - Canada: A majority of Canadians continue to be opposed to their government's commitment to have troops in Afghanistan. Overall, 55% of Canadians oppose the military mission in Afghanistan, while only 40% support it. The depth of the opposition is particularly notable: Three times more Canadians are strongly opposed to the mission (27%) than strongly support it (9%). 37% of those that support the mission would withdraw that support if the controversial Afghan law affecting women's rights is enacted.[204][205]
  • April 2009 - United Kingdom: The overwhelming majority of Britons, 72%, are against sending more British troops to Afghanistan. Only 22% support sending more troops. Despite the public's opposition, the British government under Prime Minister Gordon Brown is sending 900 more soldiers there.[206]
  • April 2009 - United States: Fewer than 4 in 10 Americans want to see more U.S. troops in Afghanistan. 51% of Americans want the troop levels to be decreased or held steady. (One third of Americans think U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan should be decreased. 18% think troop levels should be kept the same). 52% of Americans think things are going badly for the U.S. in Afghanistan, while only 36% think they are going well.[207][208]
  • April 2009 - Germany: Almost two-thirds of Germans, 64%, want their troops to pull out of Afghanistan as quickly as possible. Only a third, 32%, support keeping the troops there - the lowest level of support in Germany since the poll question was asked.[209][210][211] At the time of the poll, the number of German soldiers killed in Afghanistan stood at 31.[212]
  • April 2009 - Australia: 53% of Australians approve of Australia's military participation in Afghanistan, while 39% disapprove of it. A large majority, 69%, believe the United States and its allies are losing the war, while just 17% believe that they are winning it.[213]
  • March 2009 - Australia: Australians overwhelmingly oppose sending extra troops to Afghanistan as the death toll mounts. A majority of Australian voters, 66%, oppose sending any more Australian troops to Afghanistan, while 30% support doing so. A majority 51% of Australians oppose their country's involvement in the war, while 44% support it. At the time of the poll, Australia's death toll from the war stood at 10. [8][214][215][216]
  • March 2009 - Germany: Most Germans want all their troops out of Afghanistan, with 58% of Germans wanting their country's troops to come home. The mission has always been highly unpopular in Germany, and only 36% were in favour of the troops staying. At the time of the poll, 31 German soldiers had died in Afghanistan since 2002.[217][218]
  • March 2009 - Australia: Nearly two-thirds of Australians, 65%, say they are against sending any more Australian troops to the war in Afghanistan. Fewer than three in ten, only 28%, would support an increase in Australian forces in Afghanistan if asked by the American government. Most Australian voters oppose sending any more troops even if asked by U.S. President Barack Obama.[219][220][221][222][223]
  • March 2009 - United States: American support for the war in Afghanistan has ebbed to a new low with 42% of Americans saying that their country made a mistake in sending military forces to Afghanistan. The figure is the highest percentage since the poll first asked the question in November 2001, a few weeks into the U.S. invasion. Those that think the war is going well dropped to 38% in the latest poll, the lowest percentage since that question was asked in September 2006. [224][225]
  • March 2009 - United Kingdom: Nearly two thirds of Britons want British troops to be brought back home from Afghanistan. Three in five, or 60% of Britons, were unconvinced by their government's arguments in support of keeping a British military presence in Afghanistan, while only 35% were convinced. 30% of Britons said that they were "very unconvinced" by their government's arguments, while only 8% were "very convinced" that British troops should stay.[226][227][228][229] At the time of the publication of the poll, the death toll in the war for British soldiers stood at 150.
  • March 2009 - United Kingdom: A majority 69%, over two-thirds, of Britons say that the aim of stabilising Afghanistan is not sufficiently worthwhile to risk the lives of British troops, and 64% think the war there can never be won. 64% of Britons also favour talking to the Taliban to achieve a deal, while only 24% disagreed. Only 24% thought the aim of stabilising Afghanistan was worth risking the lives of British soldiers, only 21% thought that the war can be won eventually, and only 8% thought that more British troops should be sent. More Britons (26%) feel that the presence of NATO troops in Afghanistan provokes extremism and instability in Pakistan than (21%) feel that keeping NATO troops in Afghanistan will stop the spread of instability into Pakistan. At least 43% of Britons want their troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan. At the time of the publication of the poll, the death toll in the war for British soldiers stood at 150.[230][231]
  • February 2009 - United States: 51% of Americans are opposed to the war in Afghanistan while only 47% favor the war. However, 63% of those polled still said they supported President Obama's plan to increase the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, while 36% opposed the increase.[232]
  • February 2009 - Canada: A majority 52% of Canadians continue to disagree with their government's latest extension of the military mission in Afghanistan until 2011, and half of Canadians would end the mission. 48% of Canadians want the bulk of Canadian troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan even before the 2011 withdrawal date promised by the government. 35% think that the bulk of the troops should be withdrawn from Afghanistan in 2011. Only 7% think the bulk of the troops should remain in Afghanistan past the 2011 mission end-date.[233][234]
  • February 2009 - United States: In results that differed from those of 4 recent polls[235] [236] [237] [238] [239], two-thirds of Americans approved of President Obama's decision to send 17,000 more U.S. military troops to Afghanistan, while one third of Americans disapprove of the decision. One in four Americans says Obama should reduce the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan or withdraw them entirely. 17% of Republicans and 29% of Democrats think that the number of troops should be reduced or that the troops should be completely withdrawn. Nearly half of those polled were of the belief that Afghanistan would become stable enough within the next three years to allow most U.S. troops to be withdrawn by that time: 49% of Americans are of the belief that most U.S. troops will be withdrawn from Afghanistan within 3 years while 46% do not think so. [240][241]
  • February 2009 - Denmark: 55% of Danes believe the war against the Afghan insurgency cannot be won, while only 22% think victory is possible. Another 22% remain uncertain. 48% believed Denmark should maintain troops in Afghanistan, while 41% believed Denmark should withdraw its troops from here. The poll came as Danish soldiers began negotiating with the Taliban as a necessary step to have peace in Afghanistan.[242]
  • February 2009 - United States: Americans are almost evenly divided about whether the United States should keep a significant number of troops in Afghanistan until the situation improves (48%) or whether it should set a timetable for withdrawal (47%). [243]
  • February 2009 - Canada: 65% of Canadians say no to keeping troops in Afghanistan should President Obama request it, while only 20% said yes.[244]
  • January 2009 - United States: The plurality 46% of Americans oppose the President's plan to send more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while only 30% support an increase. 24% are not sure. [236]
  • January 2009 - Germany: 60% of Germans do not wish their government to send more troops to Afghanistan under any circumstances. [14] [245][246 ]
  • January 2009 - Italy: A majority 53% of Italians reject sending any more troops to Afghanistan. [14] [245][246 ]
  • January 2009 - Canada: 55% of Canadians oppose an extension of the mission in Afghanistan if requested by President Obama, while only 30% support it.[247][248]
  • January 2009 - United States: Only one third of Americans support President Obama's plan to increase the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Only 33% of all adults, and only 27% of Democrats, support the proposed increase. The majority of Americans either think the number of troops should not be changed (21%) or the number of troops in Afghanistan should be cut (27%). [237]
  • January 2009 - United States: In results from another poll in the U.S., 34% support an increase, 28% do not want the number changed, and 26% of Americans want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. [238]
  • January 2009 - United States: In results from still another poll, more than 60% of Americans oppose sending more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while again about a third, 34%, support an increase. [239][249]

2008

  • December 2008 - United Kingdom: Almost half of adults in Britain are completely against providing more troops in Afghanistan. 46% of Britons say their country should not send more troops to the war "under any circumstances", even upon request by Barack Obama. 39% would agree to send more soldiers to Afghanistan but only when more British troops have been withdrawn from Iraq. Only 3% would send more troops as soon as possible.[250]
  • December 2008 - Canada: A majority 58% of Canadians continue to disagree with their government's latest extension of the military mission in Afghanistan until 2011, with Canadians wanting a quicker end to the Afghan mission: A majority 53% of Canadians want the bulk of Canadian troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan before the year 2011. Only 30% think that the bulk of the troops should stay in Afghanistan until 2011 at which point they should be withdrawn. Only 8% think the bulk of the troops should remain in Afghanistan past 2011. At the time of the publication of the poll, the number of Canadian soldiers killed in the war stood at 106.[251][252]
  • November 2008 - Sweden: The plurality of Swedes, 37%, would withdraw all soldiers from Afghanistan. Another 36% would maintain the current level of troops, while only 17% agreed with sending more troops to Afghanistan.[253]
  • November 2008 - Canada: A majority 56% of Canadians continue to disagree with their government's proposed extension of the military mission in Afghanistan until 2011, and a majority 53% of Canadians call for the bulk of Canadian troops to be withdrawn from Afghanistan even before 2011. 33% think the bulk of the troops should be withdrawn from Afghanistan in 2011. Only 7% would agree to any further extension past 2011.[254][255]
  • November 2008 - United Kingdom: More than two-thirds of Britons want their troops withdrawn from Afghanistan in 2009. A majority 68% of Britons want their government to end its military deployment in Afghanistan within the next 12 months. Only 24% think they should stay past November 2009. 75% of women, 59% of men, and 75% of adults in the 18-24 age group said they wanted the troops to be pulled out of Afghanistan.[5 ] [256][257]
  • November 2008 - Germany: Most Germans feel their country is already doing enough in Afghanistan and are clearly against sending more troops to Afghanistan. The majority 80% of Germans say that a U.S. request for more troops should be refused, while only 15% support more involvement.[258][259][260]
  • October 2008 - Japan: 47% of Japanese support and 43% of Japanese oppose a 1-year extension of a controversial naval mission to provide fuel and other logistical support in the Indian Ocean to US-led military forces fighting in Afghanistan.[261]
  • October 2008 - Czech Republic: More than two-thirds of Czechs, 70%, are against their government raising the number of Czech soldiers in Afghanistan, while 30% support it. The majority of Czechs, 57%, are opposed to the deployment of their soldiers abroad, while a minority 43% agree with it.[262][263][264][265]
  • September 2008 - Australia: The majority 56% of Australians oppose the continuation of their country's military involvement in Afghanistan, while a minority of 42% support it. Only half of Australians have confidence in their government's long-term strategy there. [6][266 ][267]
  • September 2008 - France: The majority of people in France want their government to pull their troops out of Afghanistan. A 62% majority of French citizens are opposed to keeping their troops in Afghanistan, while 34% support keeping them there.[268]
  • September 2008 - Poland: The vast majority of Poles are against their country's military involvement in the NATO mission in Afghanistan. 74% of Poles express disapproval of the presence of their troops in Afghanistan, while only 21% support it. A majority 60% of Poles think that their military involvement in Afghanistan could bring about a terrorist attack, while 30% do not. Most Poles are skeptical that the goals of the NATO mission in Afghanistan will be fulfilled: 65% doubt that the mission will contribute to bringing peace to the country, while only 19% think it will.[269]
  • September 2008 - Canada: The number of Canadians who disapprove of their country's military action in Afghanistan is at its highest point since Canada became involved in the war in 2002. The majority 56% of Canadians disapprove of their country's military action in Afghanistan, while a minority 41% approve of it. Almost two-thirds of Canadians, 65%, say the mission is not likely to be successful, while only 28% think it is likely to be successful. The majority 54% of Canadians disagree with an extension of the mission past February 2009, while a minority 41% agree with it.[270]
  • August 2008 - France: The majority of French voters want their troops to be pulled out of Afghanistan. 55% of French citizens want their government led by Nicolas Sarkozy to bring their troops home, while 36% are in favour of keeping them in Afghanistan.[271][272]
  • August 2008 - United States: 54% of Americans are not confident that U.S. efforts in Afghanistan will be successful, while only 17% are confident of success. Only 11% think the situation in Afghanistan is improving, while the plurality 37% think the situation is getting worse.[273][274]
  • July 2008 - Canada: The majority of Canadians believe their government was wrong to lengthen their country’s military mission in Afghanistan. 58% of Canadians disagree with their government's proposed extension of the mission past February 2009, while 36% agree with it.[275]
  • July 2008 - Norway: 45% of Norwegians oppose their country's military participation in Afghanistan, while 42% support it.[276]
  • July 2008 - United States: 51% of Americans think the war in Afghanistan has not been successful, while 44% think it has been successful. 51% of Americans think the war in Afghanistan is worth fighting.[277]
  • July 2008 - United States: 68% of Americans think that the U.S. did not make a mistake in sending military forces to Afghanistan, down from 72% in 2004 and 93% in 2002.[278] 51% Americans think that things are going badly for the U.S. in Afghanistan, up from 46% in 2006, while 46% believe things are going well, down from 49% in 2006.[278]
  • June 2008 - United Kingdom: The majority of people in Britain want their soldiers in Afghanistan to return home. 54% of Britons think the troops should be brought back from Afghanistan, while 34% think they should remain.[279]
  • June 2008 - Spain: 56% of Spaniards want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 34% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - France: 54% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 46% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - Britain: 48% want US & NATO troops to stay in Afghanistan until the situation there has stabilized, while 43% want them to leave as soon as possible. [4]
  • June 2008 - Poland: 65% of Poles want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 24% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - Turkey: 68% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 25% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - United States: 50% want US & NATO troops to stay in Afghanistan until the situation there has stabilized, while 44% want them to leave as soon as possible. [4]
  • June 2008 - Germany: 54% of Germans want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 43% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - Jordan: 76% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 16% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - Australia: 60% of Australians want US & NATO troops to stay in Afghanistan until the situation there has stabilized, while 33% want them to leave as soon as possible. [4]
  • June 2008 - India: 42% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 33% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - Japan: 60% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 32% want them to stay. [4]
  • June 2008 - South Korea: 46% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible; 37% want them to stay. [4]
  • May 2008 - Canada: The majority of Canadians believe their government was wrong to lengthen their country’s military mission in Afghanistan. 54% of Canadians disagree with their government's proposed extension of the military mission past February 2009, while 41% agree with it.[275]
  • April 2008 - Poland: The vast majority of Poles are against their country's military mission in Afghanistan. Over three-quarters of Poles oppose their country's military involvement in Afghanistan, and almost two-thirds of Poles feel that no military operation is going to bring peace to that country. The majority 57% of Poles think that their country's military participation in Afghanistan and Iraq is likely to provoke terrorist attacks in Poland.[280]
  • April 2008 - Netherlands: 49% of Dutch citizens are against the mission and want their government to pull their troops out from Afghanistan in the summer of 2008, while 44% support it.[281]
  • April 2008 - Netherlands: 49% of Dutch citizens oppose the Dutch engagement in Uruzgan province, while 46% support it.[282]
  • April 2008 - France: The majority in France rejects a larger role in Afghanistan. 68% of French citizens are against their government's plan under Nicolas Sarkozy to increase the number of their troops in Afghanistan, while only 15% support his increase.[283]
  • March 2008 - United Kingdom: The plurality 48% in the United Kingdom oppose their country's military involvement in Afghanistan, while 40% support it.[186 ]
  • March 2008 - Canada: The majority of Canadians believe their government was wrong to lengthen their country’s military mission in Afghanistan. 58% of Canadians disagree with their government's proposed extension of the military mission past February 2009, while only 37% agree with it.[275]
  • February 2008 - Germany: The majority 63% of Germans do not think the Afghanistan mission is in their country's best interests. An overwhelming 86% majority of Germans are opposed to having German troops become more deeply involved in the fighting.[284]
  • February 2008 - Norway: 57% of Norwegians support Norway's participation in NATO's mission in Afghanistan mission, while 32% oppose the participation.[285]
  • January 2008 - Netherlands: 50% of Dutch citizens oppose the Dutch engagement in Uruzgan province, while 43% support it.[282]
  • January 2008 - Italy: 56% of Italians want their soldiers to leave Afghanistan.[286]
  • January 2008 - Canada: 56% of Canadians oppose sending troops to Afghanistan, while only 39% support.[287]

2007

  • December 2007 - United Kingdom: 62% of Britons believe their troops should be withdrawn from Afghanistan, either immediately or in the next year or so, while only 27% feel they should stay in Afghanistan.[279][288]
  • December 2007 - United States: 56% of Americans approve of the U.S. military action in Afghanistan, while 41% of Americans are opposed to it. However, 58% think neither side is winning.[289]
  • December 2007 - Netherlands: 51% of Dutch citizens disagree with their government's continuation of the Dutch military mission in Uruzgan, while 44% support it.[290 ]
  • December 2007 - Netherlands: 43% of Dutch citizens oppose their government's extension of their country's military role in Afghanistan, while only 24% support it.[291]
  • December 2007 - Japan: 47% of Japan's citizens oppose Japan's role in Afghanistan, while 39% support it.[292]
  • November 2007 - Netherlands: 51% of Dutch citizens disagree with their government's continuation of the Dutch military mission in Uruzgan, while 44% support it.[290 ]
  • October 2007 - Australia: 50% of Australians oppose their country's military involvement in Afghanistan. Three-quarters of Australians see their country's involvement in the war in Afghanistan as making their nation more of a terrorist target.[293]
  • September 2007 - Poland: The vast majority of people in Poland oppose the presence of their country’s soldiers in Afghanistan: 72% of Poles are against Poland’s participation in the war in Afghanistan, while only 22% support it.[294]
  • September 2007 - Australia: 46% of Australians would bring an end to Australia's military involvement in Afghanistan, while 46% disagree.[295]
  • August 2007 - Germany: 60% of Germans want their troops brought home.[296]
  • July 2007 - Poland: The vast majority of Poles oppose the mission in Afghanistan. 78% of Poles oppose the presence of Polish soldiers in Afghanistan, while only 17% support it.[297]
  • August 2007 - Finland: 68% of Finns would keep the same number of soldiers in Afghanistan, 19% would withdraw all soldiers, 6% would send more soldiers, and 7% did not know. 52% of Finns oppose adding Afghanistan to the list of countries receiving development assistance from Finland, while 32% support doing so. At the time of the poll, Finland had fewer than 100 troops in Afghanistan - located in the northern part of the country - and one Finnish soldier had died in the conflict.[298]
  • July 2007 - Canada: 59% of Canadians oppose sending troops to Afghanistan, while only 36% support.[299]
  • June 2007 - European Union: The majority 65% of Europeans oppose the use of their troops to conduct combat operations against the Taliban in Afghanistan. Only a minority 31% of Europeans support combat operations in Afghanistan.[300]
  • June 2007 - United States: 50% want US & NATO troops to stay in Afghanistan, while 42% want them to leave as soon as possible. [1]
  • June 2007 - Spain: 67% of Spaniards want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 22% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - France: 51% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 48% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Britain: 45% want US & NATO troops to stay in Afghanistan, while 42% want them to leave as soon as possible. [1]
  • June 2007 - Poland: 63% of Poles want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 24% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Turkey: 74% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 11% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Germany: 49% of Germans want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 44% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Jordan: 78% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 15% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - India: 49% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 34% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Japan: 47% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 29% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - South Korea: 60% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 28% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Italy: 55% of Italians want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 32% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Sweden: 45% of Swedes want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 34% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Bulgaria: 60% of Bulgarians want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 21% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Czech Republic: 45% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while 45% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Slovakia: 58% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 29% want them to stay. [1]
  • June 2007 - Ukraine: 72% want US & NATO troops to leave Afghanistan as soon as possible, while only 11% want them to stay. [1]
  • 2007 - Spain: Over 51% of Spaniards want to get Spanish troops out of Afghanistan altogether.[301]
  • May 2007 - Germany: The majority 56% of Germans want their country's soldiers withdrawn from Afghanistan.[302]
  • March 2007 - Germany: The majority 57% of Germans want a complete withdrawal of their troops from Afghanistan, while only 36% favor continued engagement.[303]
  • March 2007 - Italy: 70% of Italians oppose their country's military presence in Afghanistan, while only 27% support it.[304]
  • February 2007 - Germany: 77% of Germans oppose their government's proposal of having as many as eight Tornado reconnaissance jets with 500 pilots and support staff for the south of Afghanistan.[305]
  • January 2007 - United States: A majority 52% of Americans oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan, while 44% favour it.[306]

International public opinion compared to American public opinion

In October 2001, polls indicated that about 88% of Americans and about 65% of Britons backed military action in Afghanistan.[307] On the other hand, a large-scale 37-nation poll of world opinion carried out by Gallup International in late September 2001, found that large majorities in most countries favoured a legal response, in the form of extradition and trial, over a military response to 9/11: Only in just 3 countries out of the 37 surveyed - the United States, Israel, and India - did majorities favour military action in Afghanistan. In 34 out of the 37 countries surveyed, the survey found many clear and sizeable majorities that did not favour military action: in the United Kingdom (75%), France (67%), Switzerland (87%), Czech Republic (64%), Lithuania (83%), Panama (80%), Mexico (94%), etc.[308][309]

This dichotomy between American and international public opinion on the military operations in Afghanistan continues to be seen, although opposition to the war in Afghanistan is growing in the U.S. as well. A Gallup poll conducted July 10–12, 2009 reported that the majority 61% of Americans do not think the U.S. made a mistake in sending military forces to Afghanistan in 2001, while 36% of Americans do. 54% also thought things are going well for the U.S. in Afghanistan. [171] An Angus Reid poll conducted July 15–18, 2009, found that 55% of Americans support the military operation, while only 35% oppose it. About half, 49%, of Americans thought their country did the right thing in sending military forces to Afghanistan. About half, 48%, of Americans felt that they did not have a clear idea of what the war in Afghanistan is about. [159]

Outside the United States, on the other hand, international public opinion has been largely opposed to the war in Afghanistan. In a 47-nation June 2007 survey of global public opinion, the Pew Global Attitudes Project found considerable opposition to U.S. and NATO operations in Afghanistan. Only in just 4 out of the 47 countries surveyed was there a majority that favoured keeping military troops in Afghanistan: the U.S. (50%), Israel (59%), Ghana (50%), and Kenya (60%). [1] In 41 of the 47 countries, pluralities want U.S. and NATO military troops out of Afghanistan as soon as possible. [1] In 32 out of 47 countries, clear majorities want U.S. and NATO military troops out of Afghanistan as soon as possible. Majorities in 7 out of 12 NATO member countries say troops should be withdrawn as soon as possible. [1][2 ]

The 24-nation Pew Global Attitudes survey in June 2008 similarly found that majorities or pluralities in 21 of 24 countries want the U.S. and NATO to remove their troops from Afghanistan as soon as possible. Only in 3 out of the 24 countries - the U.S. (50%), Australia (60%), and Britain (48%) - did public opinion lean more toward keeping troops there until the situation has stabilized. [3] [4] Since that poll, views in Britain and Australia have also diverged from public opinion in the United States, and clear majorities in both Britain and Australia now want their troops to be brought back home from the war in Afghanistan.[5 ] [6] Of the seven NATO countries included in the survey, none showed a majority in favor of keeping U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan until the situation stabilised - only one, the United States, came close to a majority (50%). Of the other six NATO countries, five had clear majorities of their population wanting U.S. and NATO troops to be removed from Afghanistan as soon as possible: Spain (56%), France (54%), Germany (54%), Poland (65%), and Turkey (72%). [4]

The 25-nation Pew Global Attitudes survey in June 2009 continued to find the war in Afghanistan to be unpopular in most nations [9], with most publics wanting American and NATO troops out of Afghanistan as soon as possible. [10] The 2009 global survey reported that majorities or pluralities in 18 out of 25 countries want U.S. and NATO to remove their military troops from Afghanistan as soon as possible. [9] (Changes from the 2008 survey included Tanzania, South Africa, and Australia having been replaced by Israel, Kenya, the Palestinian Territories, and Canada in the survey, as well as shifts in opinions in India and Nigeria.) In only 4 out of 25 countries was there a majority that favoured keeping U.S. and NATO military troops in Afghanistan - the U.S. (57%), Israel (59%), Kenya (56%), and Nigeria (52%). [9] In only 1 of the 8 NATO countries included in the survey - the U.S. - was there a majority in favour of keeping U.S. and NATO military troops in Afghanistan until the situation stabilised. Despite repeated American calls for NATO allies to send more troops to Afghanistan, there was majority or plurality opposition to such action in all seven of the other NATO countries surveyed: Germany (63% disapprove), France (62%), Poland (57%), Canada (55%), Britain (51%), Spain (50%), and Turkey (49%). [11]

Growing American opposition to the war

While support for the war in Afghanistan continues to be strongest in the U.S. and Israel [9] [144], recent polls have also shown growing opposition in the U.S., including majority opposition.[310]

A Washington Post - ABC poll conducted July 15–18, 2009 found that just half of Americans, 51%, think the war in Afghanistan is worth fighting, while nearly half, 45%, think the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting - a statistical tie within the poll's ±3 point margin of error.[168 ] [169] [170] The American public is also closely divided on whether the United States is making significant progress toward winning the war, with 46% thinking so and 42% not. [169]

An Associated Press - GfK poll conducted July 16–20, 2009 found that the majority 53% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, while 44% support it. It furthermore found that the plurality of Americans, 34%, strongly opposed the war in Afghanistan, while only 20% strongly favored it. (Another 19% somewhat opposed the war in Afghanistan, 20% somewhat favored it, and 3% did not know or declined to answer.)[154 ] [155] [156]

A CNN - Opinion Research poll conducted July 31 - August 3, 2009 also found that most Americans now oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan. In a new low in American public support for the war, 54% of Americans said they opposed the U.S. war, while only 41% supported it. [142] [143]

Following the August 20, 2009 election in Afghanistan that was characterized by widespread lack of security and massive fraud, and capping off the two deadliest months for U.S. troops in the 8-year war, the CNN - Opinion Research poll conducted August 28–31, 2009 registered the highest level of opposition to the U.S. war in Afghanistan the poll has yet seen. A majority 57% of Americans now oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan, while only 42% still support it. [67][120] [121] [122] [123]

A Washington Post - ABC News poll conducted September 10–12, 2009 reported that:

"Americans are broadly skeptical of President Obama's contention that the war in Afghanistan is necessary for the war against terrorism to be a success, and few see an increase in troops as the right thing to do."

The poll found that the plurality 42% of Americans now want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and that only 26% of Americans think more troops should be sent to Afghanistan.[112 ]

The CNN - Opinion Research poll conducted September 11–13, 2009, found that American opposition to the war reached a new all-time high, while American support for the U.S. war fell to a new all-time low. The majority 58% of Americans now oppose the war in Afghanistan, while only 39% support it. [68]

Keating Holland, CNN's polling director, observed that:

"The Afghan war is almost as unpopular as the Iraq war has been for the past four years."

He noted that support for the war in Iraq had first dropped to 39 percent in June 2005 then generally remained in the low to mid-30s since. [68]

The Associated Press - GfK poll conducted October 1–5, 2009 found the majority 57% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, up 4% from July, while 40% favor the war, down 4% from July. [84]

The CNN / Opinion Research poll conducted Oct. 30 - Nov. 1, 2009 found that the majority 58% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, while 40% support it. The majority 56% of Americans also oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 42% favor doing so. [60]

The Pew Research poll conducted Oct. 28 - Nov. 8, 2009 found that the majority 59% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to the war in Afghanistan: The plurality 40% of Americans want the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be reduced, and 19% want the number of troops to remain unchanged. Only 32% support sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan. [62]

The Gallup poll conducted Nov. 5-8, 2009 found that the majority 51% of Americans oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan: The plurality 44% of Americans want the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be reduced, and 7% want the number to be kept unchanged. [52] [53] [54]

The Associated Press - GfK poll conducted November 5–9, 2009 again found that the majority 57% of Americans oppose the war in Afghanistan, while 39% favor it. [47] [48]

The ABC News / Washington Post poll conducted November 12–15, 2009 found that the majority 52% of Americans now say the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, a new high in opposition for the poll question first asked in 2007, and that only 44% say it is worth fighting, a new low in support. The majority 76% of Americans do not feel that withdrawing from Afghanistan would increase the risk of terrorism in the U.S. while only 23% feel that it would. [38] [39][40 ] [41]

"Do you favor or oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan?"
Date Favor Oppose Unsure
Oct. 30 - Nov. 1, 2009 40% 58% 2%
Sep. 11- 13, 2009 39% 58% 3%
Aug. 28 - Aug. 31, 2009 42% 57% 2%
Jul. 31 - Aug. 3, 2009 41% 54% 5%
May 14–17, 2009 50% 48% 3%
Apr. 3-5, 2009 53% 46% 1%
Feb. 18-19, 2009 47% 51% 2%
Dec. 1-2, 2008 52% 46% 2%
Jul. 27-29, 2008 46% 52% 2%
Jan. 19-21, 2007 44% 52% 4%
Sep. 22-24, 2006 50% 48% 2%

(Pluralities over the ±3 margin of error indicated in bold. Lowest levels indicated in italics. Source: CNN/Opinion Research Corporation [61])

"Do you favor or oppose the war in Afghanistan?"
Date Favor Oppose Don't know / Refused
Dec. 10-14, 2009 39% 57% 4%
Nov. 05-09, 2009 39% 57% 4%
Oct. 01-05, 2009 40% 57% 3%
Jul. 16-20, 2009 44% 53% 4%

(Pluralities over the ±3.1 margin of error indicated in bold. Lowest levels indicated in italics. Source: AP/GfK [23])

Dichotomy between Republicans and Democrats

A strong dichotomy between Republicans and Democrats exists as well. The Associated Press - GfK poll conducted July 16–20, 2009 found 66% of Republicans favoring the war in Afghanistan, while only 26% of Democrats do.[154 ] [155] [156]

The CNN - Opinion Research poll conducted July 31 - August 3, 2009 found that nearly two thirds of Republicans support the war in Afghanistan, while three quarters of Democrats oppose the war. CNN polling director Keating Holland said: [142] [143]

"Afghanistan is almost certainly the Obama policy that Republicans like the most."

An ABC News-Washington Post poll conducted Aug. 13-17, 2009 found that 78% of conservative Republicans think the war in Afghanistan is worth fighting, while only 22% of liberal Democrats do. 65% of conservative Republicans also think that the U.S. is winning the war in Afghanistan. 64% of liberal Democrats want the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be reduced, while only 22% of conservative Republicans do. [135]

A McClatchy-Ipsos poll conducted August 27–31, 2009, reported that 66% of Democrats and 67% of independents oppose sending more U.S. combat troops to Afghanistan. Only in one group was there a majority in favor of sending more combat troops to Afghanistan, with 52% of Republicans favoring a further escalation. [134]

The CNN - Opinion Research poll conducted August 28–31, 2009 again showed that most of the support for the U.S. war is from Republicans. Seven in ten Republicans support the U.S. war in Afghanistan, while nearly three quarters of Democrats oppose the war, as do 57% of independents. [67] [122]

The Washington Post - ABC News poll conducted September 10–12, 2009 found that the majority 56% of Democrats want a reduction of the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, while the plurality 39% of Republicans want more troops to be sent to the war. Only 17% of Democrats support sending any more troops to Afghanistan. The poll also reported that the majority 59% of Democrats think the "war on terrorism" can be a success without winning in Afghanistan, while the majority 66% of Republicans think the war in Afghanistan must be won to win the "war on terrorism".[112 ] [113]

The CNN - Opinion Research poll conducted September 11–13, 2009 found that only 23% of Democrats and only 39% independents support the war, while a majority 62% of Republicans support the war. The majority 75% of Democrats oppose the U.S. war in Afghanistan. [68] [107]

The USA Today - Gallup poll conducted September 22–23, 2009 found that the majority 62% of Democrats oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while the majority 63% of Republicans favor sending more U.S. troops there. The majority 53% of Democrats want to in fact begin a withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan, while only 24% of Republicans want a withdrawal to begin. Only 30% of Democrats support sending more U.S. troops. Nearly half, 49% of independents oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, and the plurality 43% of independents also want to begin to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan. [95]

The Pew Research Center poll conducted September 10–15, 2009 found that the majority 56% of Democrats want to remove U.S. and NATO troops from Afghanistan "as soon as possible", while, in contrast, 71% of Republicans favor keeping them there. By nearly two to one, 55% to 29%, Republicans also thought the U.S. is making progress rather than losing ground in defeating the Taliban militarily. Among Democrats and independents 46% and 49%, respectively, said the U.S. is losing ground in defeating the Taliban militarily. [103] [104] [105]

The Associated Press - GfK poll conducted October 1–5, 2009 found that the majority 57% of Democrats oppose sending more troops to Afghanistan, while, on the other hand, the majority 69% of Republicans favor sending more troops there.[86 ]

The Clarus Research poll conducted October 1–4, 2009, found that only 17% of Democrats supported sending more troops - The solid majority 61% of Democrats want to "decrease U.S. troop numbers in Afghanistan and begin to get out". In contrast, the majority 54% of Republicans favor sending more U.S. troops to Afghanistan. Ron Faucheux, president of Clarus Research Group, said: [87]

"Should President Obama decide to send more troops to Afghanistan, he will do it in the face of strong opposition from voters in his own party."

In a USA Today / Gallup poll conducted October 6, 2009, 59% of Democrats, and 50% of independents, opposed sending any more troops, while 73% of Republicans favored sending more troops. Half, 50%, of Democrats wanted President Obama to begin to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan, while only 18% of Republicans wanted this. [82]

In the CBS News poll conducted October 5–8, 2009, the majority 52% of Democrats wanted to decrease the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, while the majority 57% of Republicans want to increase the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Only 27% of Democrats support sending more troops to Afghanistan. The majority 76% of Republicans think the U.S. is doing the right thing by fighting the war, while, on the other hand, the plurality 49% of Democrats think the U.S. should not be involved in Afghanistan. [80]

In the ABC News - Washington Post poll conducted October 15–18, 2009, the majority 60% of Democrats opposed sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while the majority 69% of Republicans favored sending more troops there. Only 36% of Democrats felt the war was worth fighting, while 71% of Republicans did. [69][70 ] [71]

In the Pew Research poll conducted Oct. 28 - Nov. 8, 2009, the majority 70% of Democrats oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 48% of Republicans favor sending more troops there. The plurality 50% of Democrats want the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be reduced, while 25% of Republicans did as well. [62]

In the Gallup poll conducted Nov. 5-8, 2009, the majority 66% of Democrats oppose sending any more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, while 63% of Republicans want to send more troops there. The majority 60% of Democrats want President Obama to, in fact, begin reducing U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan. 26% of Republicans wanted a reduction in troops to begin. Gallup noted: [52] [53] [54]

"If Obama decides to increase U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan, he will be going against the wishes of the vast majority of rank-and-file Democrats."

In the ABC News / Washington Post poll was conducted November 12–15, 2009, the political divide in the U.S. over the war continued: the majority 66% of Democrats say the war is not worth fighting, with narly half of Democrats, 48%, feeling strongly that the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, while, on the other hand, the majority 60% of Republicans say that it is worth fighting, with 43% of Republicans feeling strongly that it is. [42]

Opposition of the public among NATO allies of the U.S.

While over 2 out of 3 foreign troops in Afghanistan are American, troops from NATO allies of the U.S. also serve under U.S. command. Opposition to the war, however, runs high among the United States' NATO allies in Afghanistan. [3] [4] [9] [11][311][312] [313]

In 2008, not one of the six NATO allies in the Pew Global Attitudes survey had majority support for keeping troops in Afghanistan, and five of the six had majorities wanting withdrawal as soon as possible. In 2009, not one of the seven NATO allies in the Pew Global Attitudes survey had majority support for continuing to keep military forces there, but all seven of the NATO allies in the survey had majority or strong plurality opposition to sending more troops. [3] [4] [9] [11]

The June 2009 "Transatlantic Trends" survey of 13 NATO countries, also from an American policy think tank, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, further underlined the publics' opposition to the war in NATO countries involved with the U.S. in Afghanistan. [193] [313]

The majorities of the populations of all 12 of the NATO nations surveyed in Europe and Turkey want their military forces in Afghanistan to be reduced or completely withdrawn - United Kingdom (60%), France (51%), Germany (57%), Italy (55%), Netherlands (50%), Poland (68%), Portugal (52%), Spain (54%), Slovakia (61%), Bulgaria (72%), Romania (61%), Turkey (50%). [193] [313]

The majority 55% of West Europeans and the majority 69% of East Europeans want to reduce or remove their troops from Afghanistan, with complete troop removal called for by 51% of Poles, 50% of Bulgarians, 48% of Romanians, 41% of Britons, and 41% of Germans. [313]

Despite pressure from the Obama administration to increase their troop levels in Afghanistan, the public is strongly opposed in all 12 of the NATO ally countries surveyed. Over 3 out of every 4 people, 77%, in the 12 NATO countries surveyed in the Europe Union and Turkey oppose sending any more combat troops to Afghanistan. Fewer than 1 in 5 people, 19%, in the 12 NATO countries supported sending more combat troops. [313]

Level of support for sending more troops to Afghanistan
NATO member % Support
United States 30%
United Kingdom 11%
France 4%
Germany 7%
Italy 6%
Netherlands 4%
Poland 5%
Portugal 4%
Spain 7%
Slovakia 2%
Bulgaria 2%
Romania 5%
Turkey 14%

(Source: German Marshall Fund of the United States - Transatlantic Trends June 2009 survey [193])

The poll of the NATO countries, conducted in June 2009, about 2 months before the Afghan election, also reported that a majority of Americans, 56%, were optimistic about stabilizing the situation in Afghanistan, whereas the majority 62% of people in the 12 NATO countries in Europe and Turkey were not. [313]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w 47-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Survey p.24, p.116
  2. ^ a b Global Unease With Major World Powers
  3. ^ a b c d June 2008 Pew Global Attitudes Project Survey
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r 24-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Project Survey p.8, p.29
  5. ^ a b c Britons call for troop withdrawal
  6. ^ a b c "Australians lose faith in Afghan war effort". http://www.canberratimes.com.au/news/local/news/general/australians-lose-faith-in-afghan-war-effort/1320931.aspx.  
  7. ^ a b Cruel human toll of fight to win Afghan peace
  8. ^ a b Poll finds 51% oppose role in Afghanistan
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag 25-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Survey, 2009, p.22 (PDF p.26) Opposition to War in Afghanistan
  10. ^ a b 25-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Survey, 2009, p.13 (PDF p.17)
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab 25-Nation Pew Global Attitudes Survey, 2009, p.39 (PDF p.43)
  12. ^ Obama's Unlikely Ally: Iran Signs On To Afghan Plan
  13. ^ Afghan war exposes flaws in assumption of Nato unity
  14. ^ a b c d e Europe opposes more troops for Afghanistan: poll
  15. ^ Merkel’s Poll Rating Falls to 3-Year Low on German Job Concerns
  16. ^ LONDON 28 Jan 2010 British prime minister hosts conference on Afghanistan
  17. ^ German poll finds support for Merkel plunging
  18. ^ Holbrooke pressures Berlin on Afghanistan
  19. ^ Spanish oppose sending more soldiers to Afghanistan
  20. ^ Spain split on Afghan mission
  21. ^ NBC / Wall Street Journal poll was conducted Dec. 11-14, 2009
  22. ^ AP-GfK Poll: Gains for Obama, not his Afghan plans
  23. ^ a b AP-GfK poll conducted Dec. 10-14, 2009
  24. ^ National Assembly debates military reinforcements in Afghanistan
  25. ^ Reuters - 82% des Français contre l'envoi de renforts en Afghanistan
  26. ^ AP - Sondage: 82% des Français opposés à un engagement supplémentaire en Afghanistan
  27. ^ AFP - Un engagement supplémentaire en Afghanistan majoritairement rejeté par les Français
  28. ^ Britons Remain Opposed to Afghanistan Mission
  29. ^ Obama’s Plan for Afghanistan Finds Bipartisan Support
  30. ^ Canadians Decline Expanded Role in Afghanistan
  31. ^ Support for Afghan Mission Dwindles in U.S.
  32. ^ Germans Mount Pressure on Afghan Withdrawal
  33. ^ Berlin renews Afghan presence
  34. ^ SPD to target Guttenberg in Afghan inquiry
  35. ^ Peace vigil against the extension of the Bundeswehr deployment in Afghanistan
  36. ^ poll Nov. 20-22, 2009
  37. ^ Poll: Most Say War in Afghanistan Going Badly
  38. ^ a b Majority in US see Afghan war not worth cost: poll
  39. ^ a b ABC News / Washington Post poll conducted November 12-15, 2009
  40. ^ a b Afghan War Support Slips
  41. ^ a b While Obama patiently ponders Afghan policy, impatient Americans are already deciding: poll
  42. ^ a b Partisan divide widens as Obama considers Afghanistan policy
  43. ^ 71% support Afghan withdrawal: poll
  44. ^ Seven out of 10 Brits want their army out of Afghanistan
  45. ^ Support grows for Afghanistan pullout: poll
  46. ^ War in Afghanistan: Not in our name
  47. ^ a b Associated Press - GfK poll conducted November 5-9, 2009
  48. ^ a b Americans grow more pessimistic about direction of country, poll finds
  49. ^ Afghan war is bad for security, voters say
  50. ^ Britons question reasons for Afghan conflict: poll
  51. ^ Afghanistan war "not keeping UK safe"
  52. ^ a b c Poll: Majority Opposes New Troops to Afghanistan
  53. ^ a b c Withdrawal edges ahead - Poll: Majority opposes new troops
  54. ^ a b c Americans Split on Afghanistan Troop Increase vs. Decrease
  55. ^ Salmond in Afghan withdrawal call
  56. ^ Support for Afghan war fading: poll
  57. ^ a b c d e f icasualties.org British deaths in Afghanistan
  58. ^ Afghan poll: majority want troops home
  59. ^ YouGov / Channel 4 News poll November 4-5, 2009
  60. ^ a b Most Americans oppose Afghanistan troop boost: poll
  61. ^ a b CNN / Opinion Research poll conducted Oct. 30 - Nov. 1, 2009
  62. ^ a b c Pew Research poll conducted Oct. 28 - Nov. 8, 2009
  63. ^ An overwhelming 84 per cent believe British troops are currently losing the war in Afghanistan
  64. ^ Half of UK public think Afghanistan war is unwinnable
  65. ^ CNN Poll: Will Afghanistan turn into another Vietnam?
  66. ^ CNN - Opinion Research poll conducted October 16-18, 2009
  67. ^ a b c d CNN - Opinion Research poll August 28-31, 2009
  68. ^ a b c d e Poll: Support for Afghan war at all-time low
  69. ^ a b ABC News poll conducted October 15-18, 2009
  70. ^ a b Obama's Ratings Slip on Afghanistan
  71. ^ a b Americans divided on Afghan troop increase
  72. ^ Populus / Times poll conducted October 9-11, 2009
  73. ^ Rising clamour for British troops to pull out of Afghanistan
  74. ^ British support for Afghan mission waning: poll
  75. ^ a b c Support for Afghan Mission Drops in UK, Canada
  76. ^ The Sun / YouGov poll conducted October 8-9, 2009
  77. ^ The 2009 Lowy Institute Poll
  78. ^ Australians happier with US but not China
  79. ^ Majority Want Afghan Troops Levels to Stay the Same or Be Reduced
  80. ^ a b CBS News poll conducted October 5-8, 2009
  81. ^ Poll finds skepticism on Afghanistan democracy
  82. ^ a b Americans Divided on Sending More Troops to Afghanistan
  83. ^ Many Japanese Would Cease Afghan War Role
  84. ^ a b AP-GfK poll conducted October 1-5, 2009
  85. ^ AP Poll: Obama's job approval rises amid concerns
  86. ^ a b Obama ponders Afghanistan troop boost
  87. ^ a b Democrats Strongly Oppose Sending More Troops to Afghanistan, Most Voters Wary of War's Outcome
  88. ^ Most 'remain against Afghan war'
  89. ^ Britons 'opposed to Afghan mission' BBC poll: More than half of Britons oppose their country's campaign in Afghanistan
  90. ^ BBC poll: More than half of Britons oppose their country's campaign in Afghanistan
  91. ^ Six out of 10 Britons oppose Afghanistan war
  92. ^ The Economist / YouGov poll conducted September 27-29, 2009
  93. ^ Leger Marketing poll September 22-25, 2009 - Canadians Massively Want Canada to Stop Combating in Afghanistan
  94. ^ Dutch Oppose Extending Afghan Mission
  95. ^ a b Poll: 50% oppose U.S. surge in Afghanistan
  96. ^ 5 US troops killed as debate grows over Afghan war
  97. ^ New York Times / CBS News poll September 19-23, 2009
  98. ^ Poll: Public pessimistic about Afghanistan
  99. ^ NBC News / Wall Street Journal poll September 17-20, 2009
  100. ^ Younger Finns most eager supporters of Finnish peace-keeping operation in Afghanistan
  101. ^ Poll: Half of Population Supports Peacekeeping Operation in Afghanistan
  102. ^ Few Finns want troops out of Afghanistan -HS/TNS poll
  103. ^ a b Foreign and Domestic Polls Show Declining Support for U.S. Engagement Abroad
  104. ^ a b Public Support for Afghanistan War Wanes
  105. ^ a b Pew Research Center September 10-15, 2009 poll topline
  106. ^ Public Opinion on Afghanistan: All the Numbers Get Worse
  107. ^ a b Amy Goodman: U.S. must not become the evil it deplores
  108. ^ a b Don't mention the war - Germany's Afghanistan taboo
  109. ^ ZDF - Tagesspiegel poll conducted September 11, 2009
  110. ^ Germans focus on Afghanistan after al-Qaida threat
  111. ^ 'Bin Laden' urges Afghan pull-out
  112. ^ a b c A Skeptical View of Afghanistan
  113. ^ a b Anti-War Stirrings Greet Call For More Troops
  114. ^ ARD - Deutschlandtrend poll conducted September 10, 2009
  115. ^ ARD - Deutschlandtrend poll conducted September 10, 2009 details
  116. ^ ARD - Deutschlandtrend poll June 2007 - September 2009
  117. ^ Italians support shift in Afghan strategy
  118. ^ iCasualties.org Italian deaths in Afghanistan
  119. ^ Dutch still support soldiers, but not mission in Afghanistan
  120. ^ a b Losing Afghanistan?
  121. ^ a b West faces losing battle over Afghan poll fraud
  122. ^ a b c CNN Poll: Afghanistan War opposition at all-time high
  123. ^ a b August Tied for Deadliest Month in Afghanistan
  124. ^ Poll: Obama's Ratings on Afghanistan Drop
  125. ^ Two thirds want British troops home from Afghanistan
  126. ^ The Sun / YouGov poll conducted August 28-29, 2009
  127. ^ Poll: Most Americans oppose more troops for Afghanistan
  128. ^ The Economist / YouGov poll conducted Aug. 23-25, 2009
  129. ^ More than half of British public against UK mission in Afghanistan
  130. ^ Majority of Britons 'oppose Afghan war'
  131. ^ Two soldiers killed on foot patrol, taking Afghan death toll to 206
  132. ^ 'Two thirds' want UK soldiers out
  133. ^ Poll shows most Britons oppose war in Afghanistan
  134. ^ a b Poll: Most say Afghanistan war not worth fighting
  135. ^ a b ABC News - Washington Post poll August 13-17, 2009
  136. ^ French Majority Opposes Role in Afghanistan
  137. ^ War set to rage until 2050
  138. ^ YouGov poll for Sky News released August 17, 2009
  139. ^ More British deaths as PM says Afghan mission 'vital'
  140. ^ Soldiers’ deaths take Afghan toll to 204
  141. ^ YouGov poll for Sky News
  142. ^ a b c Most Americans oppose Afghanistan war: poll
  143. ^ a b c Support for Afghan war drops, CNN poll finds
  144. ^ a b c d Global Citizens More Cautious About Afghan War
  145. ^ New Zealanders Agree with Afghanistan Role
  146. ^ Pakistanis Want Out of U.S.-Led War on Terror
  147. ^ Gordon Brown is 'John Major in 1996', according to new poll
  148. ^ YouGov / Daily Telegraph poll July 28-30, 2009
  149. ^ Italians Want Troops Out of Afghanistan
  150. ^ Most want troops out of Afghanistan: survey
  151. ^ Britons question Afghan war as bodies flown home
  152. ^ Most people think British troops should leave Afghanistan, poll finds
  153. ^ Dutch Ponder Future of Afghan Mission
  154. ^ a b c Majority in US oppose both wars
  155. ^ a b c Poll details: Majority in US oppose both wars
  156. ^ a b c Associated Press - GfK poll, July 16-20, 2009
  157. ^ Finns support operations in Afghanistan despite attacks
  158. ^ Few Finns want troops withdrawn from Afghanistan -AL/TT poll
  159. ^ a b c d Britain, Canada Differ from U.S. on Afghan War
  160. ^ a b c Americans Still Support Afghanistan Mission; Canadians and Britons Do Not
  161. ^ a b April date for general election campaign?
  162. ^ a b Lib Dems now breathing down Labour's neck
  163. ^ Public blames casualties in Afghanistan on poor equipment, poll shows
  164. ^ Alan Johnson hints at April general election after Tories open 17-point lead on Labour
  165. ^ Tories take 17-point lead in polls
  166. ^ YouGov poll for Sunday Times, July 16-17, 2009
  167. ^ Half of Czechs do not want Czech soldiers in Afghanistan - poll
  168. ^ a b ABC News-Washington Post Poll
  169. ^ a b c d U.S. Deaths Hit A Record High in Afghanistan
  170. ^ a b Washington Post-ABC News poll July 15-18, 2009
  171. ^ a b Americans Upbeat on Progress in Iraq, Afghanistan
  172. ^ Deaths of U.S. troops exceed 5,000 in wars
  173. ^ Most Canadians oppose military role in Afghanistan
  174. ^ Canadian soldier killed in Afghanistan
  175. ^ Decisive opposition to Canada's Afghanistan mission
  176. ^ Bob Ainsworth forced on defensive over British strategy in Afghanistan
  177. ^ Brown says more troops 'not needed'
  178. ^ Tears for our brave boys
  179. ^ a b Opposition to war in Afghanistan on the rise, poll shows
  180. ^ a b c d Survey of public opinion on Afghan conflict finds support, and doubt
  181. ^ a b Death toll in Afghanistan fuels British opposition to war
  182. ^ Enough. This senseless folly in Afghanistan must stop
  183. ^ a b "Public support for war in Afghanistan is firm, despite deaths"
  184. ^ British PM under pressure over Afghanistan deaths
  185. ^ Brown tries to buoy support for UK Afghan mission
  186. ^ a b Afghan conflict support 'rises'
  187. ^ Britain roiled by troop deaths in Afghanistan
  188. ^ The World from Berlin - ARD poll
  189. ^ Not Calling Afghanistan a War Is a 'Semantic Farce'
  190. ^ The Afghanistan Debate - Germany Mulls Future as Attacks Surge
  191. ^ German leaders defend Afghan mission
  192. ^ Double-Talk on Afghanistan Reaching 'New Level of Absurdity'
  193. ^ Half of Canadians Adamant About Ending Afghan Mission Before 2011
  194. ^ CNN Poll: Americans divided on Afghanistan war
  195. ^ Australians Reject New Afghan Deployment
  196. ^ Four in 10 say end Afghan mission early, poll finds
  197. ^ Poll shows support for Taliban talks
  198. ^ Gallup / Berlingske Tidende April 2009 poll
  199. ^ Half of Australians Would Leave Afghanistan
  200. ^ CNN Poll: Obama not making U.S. less safe
  201. ^ Dutch Oppose Extending Afghan Mission
  202. ^ Dutch news in brief, Tuesday 14 April 2009
  203. ^ Majority Opposed to Afghan Mission, Many Concerned about New Law
  204. ^ Rape law saps support for Afghan mission: poll
  205. ^ Gordon Brown claims Nato coup over Afghanistan
  206. ^ Obama's Afghanistan Problem
  207. ^ CBC News/New York Times poll April 6, 2009
  208. ^ Raus aus Afghanistan
  209. ^ Escape from Afghanistan
  210. ^ NATO confronted with protests
  211. ^ German Armed Forces casualties in Afghanistan
  212. ^ Public opinion towards defence and foreign affairs: Results from the ANU poll p.14
  213. ^ Two-thirds oppose sending more troops
  214. ^ Australians Oppose Sending Troops to Afghanistan, Poll Says
  215. ^ Australians oppose extra Afghan troops: poll
  216. ^ Most Germans Want Their Troops Out Of Afghanistan - Poll
  217. ^ Germans Would Remove Troops from Afghanistan
  218. ^ Aussies oppose extra troops for Afghanistan: poll
  219. ^ No blank cheque on Afghan war, says Rudd
  220. ^ Australians: No More Troops to Afghanistan
  221. ^ Australians oppose extra Afghan troops: poll
  222. ^ Australians Against More Troops in Afghanistan
  223. ^ Poll: More view Afghan war as 'mistake'
  224. ^ As US public sours on Afghanistan, Obama calls for 'exit strategy' - The president said the US cannot stay indefinitely
  225. ^ Majority 'want Iraq war inquiry'
  226. ^ 'Afghan war vital' but Brits want out
  227. ^ Poll: 60pct in UK unconvinced about Afghan mission
  228. ^ Britons Unconvinced on Afghanistan Mission
  229. ^ Taliban chief backs Afghan peace talks
  230. ^ YouGov / Sunday Times survey results March 12-13, 2009
  231. ^ Poll: Most support plan to bolster U.S. troops in Afghanistan
  232. ^ Half of Canadians Would End Afghan Mission
  233. ^ Almost Half of Canadians Would End Afghan Mission Before 2011
  234. ^ US set to pop troop question once more to Australia
  235. ^ a b Financial Times poll: Only 1-in-3 favor sending more troops to Afghanistan
  236. ^ a b BBC World News America poll: Only one third of Americans support troop increase in Afghanistan
  237. ^ a b An unpopular war of his own (New York Times / CBS poll)
  238. ^ a b With Afghanistan Troop Decision, Obama Makes His First Major Move without Majority Support
  239. ^ Poll: Most back Obama's troop plan for Afghanistan
  240. ^ Americans support Obama on Afghanistan
  241. ^ Danish troops in negotiations with moderate 'local' Taliban
  242. ^ Americans See Afghanistan War as Still Worth Fighting though many would like faster withdrawal of troops than is likely
  243. ^ Canada’s love affair with Barack Obama
  244. ^ a b c d EU voters resistant to further Afghan deployments: poll
  245. ^ a b c Poll shows EU resistance on Afghan war
  246. ^ Obama will seek Afghanistan troops elsewhere, MacKay says
  247. ^ Canadians feel the love for Obama, but are lukewarm to his plans: poll
  248. ^ Nation's Hopes High for Obama, Poll Shows (Washington Post - ABC News poll)
  249. ^ Britons Object to More Troops in Afghanistan
  250. ^ Canadians Want Quicker End to Afghan Mission
  251. ^ Canadians Question Afghanistan Mission
  252. ^ Swedes Reject Troop Increase in Afghanistan
  253. ^ Canadian Majority Wants Troops Out of Afghanistan Before 2011
  254. ^ Canadians Would Leave Afghanistan Before 2011
  255. ^ Most Britons want troops out of Afghanistan: poll
  256. ^ Britons Would Leave Afghanistan in 2009
  257. ^ Germans to fight Obama on troops
  258. ^ Germany to Obama: We Will Resist Calls for More Troops
  259. ^ Germans prepare to resist Obama on troops
  260. ^ Japan committee votes to extend Afghan mission
  261. ^ Czech Oppose More Afghan Deployments
  262. ^ Poll: Most Czechs do not want more Czech soldiers in Afghanistan
  263. ^ Poll: Most Czechs do not want more Czech soldiers in Afghanistan
  264. ^ 70% of Czechs against sending more soldiers to Afghanistan
  265. ^ "Government losing support for Afghanistan campaign". http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/09/29/2377129.htm?section=world.  
  266. ^ "Opposition mounts against Afghan war". http://www.theage.com.au/national/opposition-mounts-against-afghan-war-20080929-4qew.html.  
  267. ^ "French Want Soldiers Out of Afghanistan". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/31833.  
  268. ^ "Poles against mission in Afghanistan". http://www.polskieradio.pl/thenews/foreign-affairs/?id=91641.  
  269. ^ "Public support for Afghan mission lowest ever: poll". http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2008/09/05/poll-afghan.html.  
  270. ^ "Pressure grows on Nicolas Sarkozy for Afghanistan pullout". London. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article4592903.ece.  
  271. ^ "French Majority Would Leave Afghanistan". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/31603/french_majority_would_leave_afghanistan.  
  272. ^ "Poll: U.S. confidence in Afghanistan low". http://www.upi.com/Top_News/2008/09/05/Poll_US_confidence_in_Afghanistan_low/UPI-23021220658091/.  
  273. ^ "Americans Lack Confidence in U.S. Afghanistan Policy". http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/americans-lack-confidence-us-afghanistan/story.aspx?guid=%7BC97583A4-7908-4E2D-9498-38E11AB6AB59%7D.  
  274. ^ a b c "More Canadians Oppose Afghanistan Extension". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/31183/more_canadians_oppose_afghanistan_extension.  
  275. ^ "Fewer Norwegians Support Afghan Mission". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/31350/fewer_norwegians_support_afghan_mission.  
  276. ^ "Views on Afghanistan War Plummet in U.S.". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/31268/views_on_afghanistan_war_plummet_in_us.  
  277. ^ a b Afghan War Edges Out Iraq as Most Important for U.S.
  278. ^ a b "Britons Call for Return of Troops in Afghanistan". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/31051/britons_call_for_return_of_troops_in_afghanistan.  
  279. ^ "Poles disapprove of Polish foreign military missions". http://www.polskieradio.pl/thenews/foreign-affairs/?id=82766.  
  280. ^ "One in two Dutch oppose Afghanistan mission: poll". http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSL1915886320080419.  
  281. ^ a b "Dutch Still Divided on Afghanistan Mission". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/30510/dutch_still_divided_on_afghanistan_mission.  
  282. ^ "French Reject Larger Role in Afghanistan". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/30356/french_reject_larger_role_in_afghanistan.  
  283. ^ "America's Failure in Afghanistan". http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,534467,00.html.  
  284. ^ "Norway urges stronger U.N. role in Afghanistan". http://in.reuters.com/article/companyNews/idINL0582837520080205.  
  285. ^ "AFGHANISTAN: Most Italians Want to Quit". http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=36301.  
  286. ^ "Poll results January 2008" (PDF). http://www.thestrategiccounsel.com/our%5Fnews/polls/2008-01-14%20GMCTV%20Jan%2010-131.pdf.  
  287. ^ "The Afghanistan Question". http://www.angus-reid.com/analysis/view/30584/the_afghanistan_question/.  
  288. ^ "U.S. Backs Afghan Mission, But Sees No Winner". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/us_backs_afghan_mission_but_sees_no_winner/.  
  289. ^ a b "Dutch Still Opposed to Afghan Mission Plan". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/dutch_still_opposed_to_afghan_mission_plan/.  
  290. ^ "Only One-in-Four Dutch Back Afghan Mission". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/29264/only_one_in_four_dutch_back_afghan_mission.  
  291. ^ "Japanese Divided Over Role in Afghanistan". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/29457/japanese_divided_over_role_in_afghanistan.  
  292. ^ "Climate, not terror most worries Aussies". http://www.thewest.com.au/aapstory.aspx?StoryName=424104.  
  293. ^ Poles Want Troops Out of Afghanistan
  294. ^ "Australians Ponder Iraq, Afghanistan Missions". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/28118/australians_ponder_iraq_afghanistan_missions.  
  295. ^ "Amid escalating violence in Afghanistan, rising opposition in Germany to military mission". http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/08/19/news/germany.php.  
  296. ^ "Poles Oppose Afghan and Iraqi Missions". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/16365.  
  297. ^ Finns Would Not Alter Afghan Mission
  298. ^ "Poll results January 2008 and earlier" (PDF). http://www.thestrategiccounsel.com/our%5Fnews/polls/2008-01-14%20GMCTV%20Jan%2010-131.pdf.  
  299. ^ "Transatlantic Trends - Key Kindings 2007, page 14, Chart 9." (PDF). http://www.transatlantictrends.org/trends/doc/Transatlantic%20Trends_all_0920.pdf.  
  300. ^ "NATO: Alliance Of the Unwilling". http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,1725548,00.html.  
  301. ^ "Poll results January 2008 and earlier". http://articles.latimes.com/2007/jul/05/world/fg-afghan5.  
  302. ^ "Germany reports a citizen kidnapped". http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,2144,2387842,00.html.  
  303. ^ "Some Italians Say Afghanistan a Waste of Money". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/15098.  
  304. ^ U.S. Presses NATO to Send More Troops to Afghanistan
  305. ^ "For the First Time, Americans Oppose Afghan War". http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/view/14497.  
  306. ^ "America and the War on Terror". AEI Public Opinion Study. http://www.aei.org/publications/filter.all,pubID.22819/pub_detail.asp. Retrieved 2007-09-27.   Published July 24, 2008.
  307. ^ "World Opinion Opposes the Attack on Afghanistan". http://www.globalpolicy.org/empire/media/2001/1121opinion.htm.  
  308. ^ "Strange Victory: A critical appraisal of Operation Enduring Freedom and the Afghanistan war". http://www.comw.org/pda/0201strangevic.html.  
  309. ^ We can't fight our way out of Afghanistan
  310. ^ Reassessing Obama's 'war of necessity'
  311. ^ Obama to Weigh Buildup Option in Afghan War

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