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Internet phenomena in the People's Republic of China: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of phenomena specific to the Internet within the People's Republic of China.

Memes

  • Very erotic very violent — An common internet catchphrase, after a report by Xinwen Lianbo, the most viewed of China's state-sponsored news programs, where a young girl was reportedly to have come across content on the internet which was "Very erotic, very violent". This incident sparked wide forms of parody on the internet, and also questioned the credibility of the state broadcaster's newscasts.
  • Very good very mighty - a common catchphrase found throughout Chinese forums, and has many different variants.
  • Jia Junpeng — A post on the Baidu Tieba WOW forum which attracted more than 400,000 viewers and 17,000 replies, despite only consisting of the text "Jia Junpeng, your mother is calling you home for dinner".
  • Honglaowai — An American singing Chinese Communist songs.
  • Bus uncle — The reaction of an angry middle aged man towards a young man seated behind him on a bus in Hong Kong, which became widespread over the internet.
  • Back Dorm Boys — Two Chinese males lip-synching to Backstreet Boys in a dormitory.
  • Xianxingzhe — the first bipedal humanoid robot in China, commonly subject to parody and ridicule on the internet.
  • Hong Kong 97 — a game made in Japan and set around the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong in 1997, which features poor quality graphics, difficult gameplay, and character control, and a bizarre storyline. The game has gained a cult following for its notoriously poor quality - it has been ranked as a kuso-ge (Japanese for "shitty game"), a game so bad that it's good.
  • Q-version — cartoonification or infantilization in the artistic renderings of real life characters or objects, commonly found on the internet.
  • Fist of the North Star — a Japanese manga commonly subject to parody in mainland China and Taiwan.

Politically-motivated memes

See also

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This is a list of phenomena specific to the Internet within the People's Republic of China.

Contents

Memes

  • Very erotic very violent — A common Internet catchphrase, after a report by Xinwen Lianbo, the most viewed of China's state-sponsored news programs, where a young girl was reportedly to have come across content on the Internet which was "Very erotic, very violent". This incident sparked wide forms of parody on the Internet, and also questioned the credibility of the state broadcaster's newscasts.
  • Very good very mighty - a common catchphrase found throughout Chinese forums, and has many different variants.
  • Jia Junpeng — A post on the Baidu Tieba World of Warcraft forum which attracted more than 400,000 viewers and 17,000 replies, despite only consisting of the text "Jia Junpeng, your mother is calling you home for dinner".
  • Honglaowai — An American singing Chinese Communist songs.
  • Bus uncle — The reaction of an angry middle aged man towards a young man seated behind him on a bus in Hong Kong, which became widespread over the Internet.
  • Back Dorm Boys — Two Chinese males lip-synching to Backstreet Boys in a dormitory.
  • Xianxingzhe — the first bipedal humanoid robot in China, commonly subject to parody and ridicule on the Internet.
  • Hong Kong 97 — a game made in Japan and set around the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong in 1997, which features poor quality graphics, difficult gameplay, and character control, and a bizarre storyline. The game has gained a cult following for its notoriously poor quality - it has been ranked as a kuso-ge (Japanese for "shitty game"), a game so bad that it's good.
  • Q-version — cartoonification or infantilization in the artistic renderings of real life characters or objects, commonly found on the Internet.
  • Fist of the North Star — a Japanese manga commonly subject to parody in mainland China and Taiwan.

Politically-motivated memes

References

See also


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