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Interstate Highways in Alaska: Wikis

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Map of the Interstates of Alaska

There are four officially designated Interstate Highways in Alaska, even the routes do not connect directly to any highways in the contiguous United States, except either by the Alaska Marine Highway System ferries or via Canadian highways.

These routes are numbered A-1 through A-4 and receive similar funding to interstates in other states; however they are not signed with interstate highway shields.

They follow various combinations of Alaska Routes, which generally fail to meet Interstate Highway standards, being for the most part two-lane rural highways without controlled access. The federal government established the classification of these roads as Interstate Highways, primarily for funding purposes. Limited-access freeways exist only within and near Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Wasilla.

Contents

Routes

* Interstate A1 — 408.23 miles (656.98 km)[1]
Anchorage to Canadian border 
Encompasses the Glenn Highway; the Richardson Highway between the Glenn Highway and the Tok Cut-Off; the Tok Cut-Off; and the Alaska Highway between Tok and the Canadian border.
* Interstate A2 — 202.18 miles (325.38 km)[1]
Tok to Fairbanks 
Encompasses the Alaska Highway between Tok and Delta Junction; and the Richardson Highway between Delta Junction and Fairbanks.
* Interstate A3 — 148.12 miles (238.38 km)[1]
Anchorage to Soldotna 
Encompasses the Seward Highway between Anchorage and Tern Lake; and the Sterling Highway between Tern Lake and Soldotna.
* Interstate A4 — 323.69 miles (520.93 km)[1]
Palmer to Fairbanks 
Encompasses the Parks Highway which runs from Palmer to Fairbanks.

See also

References

External links

Main Interstate Highways (major interstates highlighted)
4 5 8 10 12 15 16 17 19 20 22 24 25 26 27 29 30
35 37 39 40 43 44 45 49 55 57 59 64 65 66 68 69
70 71 72 73 74 75 76 (W) 76 (E) 77 78 79 80 81 82
83 84 (W) 84 (E) 85 86 (W) 86 (E) 87 88 (W) 88 (E) 89 90
91 93 94 95 96 97 99 (238) H-1 H-2 H-3
Unsigned  A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4 PRI-1 PRI-2 PRI-3
Lists  Primary  Main - Intrastate - Suffixed - Future - Gaps
Auxiliary  Main - Future - Unsigned
Other  Standards - Business - Bypassed
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Simple English

There are Interstate Highways in Alaska that get money from the government. Even though these are Interstate Highways, most of them are not grade separated, which means drivers must use a specially made group of ramps to get to the road. They mostly are along roads with two lanes. Also, there are no signs for these Interstate Highways.

The four Interstate Highways in Alaska are:

  • Interstate A1 goes from Anchorage to the Canada border. It is 408.23 miles (656.98 km) long.[1]
  • Interstate A2 goes from Tok to Fairbanks. It is 202.18 miles (325.38 km) long.[1]
  • Interstate A3 goes from Anchorage to Soldonta. It is 148.12 miles (238.38 km) long.[1]
  • Interstate A4 goes from Palmer to Fairbanks. It is 323.69 miles (520.93 km) long.[1]

References

Main Interstates (numbers that end in 0 or 5 are colored pink)
4 5 8 10 12 15 16 17 19 20 22 24 25 26 27 29 30
35 37 39 40 43 44 45 49 55 57 59 64 65 66 68 69
70 71 72 73 74 75 76 (W) 76 (E) 77 78 79 80 81 82
83 84 (W) 84 (E) 85 86 (W) 86 (E) 87 88 (W) 88 (E) 89 90
91 93 94 95 96 97 99 (238) H-1 H-2 H-3
Unsigned  A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4 PRI-1 PRI-2 PRI-3

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