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Pirate radio in Ireland has had a long history, with hundreds of stations having operated from within the country. Due to past lax enforcement of the rules, the lack of commercial radio until 1989, and the small physical size of the country, pirate radio has proliferated up to recent years. They were tolerated by the government which only occasionally raided them in an effort to show compliance with Irish law, although the national broadcaster, RTÉ, took a harsher approach, including radio jamming.

Whilst the number of recorded pirate radio stations was in the hundreds, only a few have been notable enough to be remembered. This is because at different stages, pirate stations were the mainstay of radio listenership, particularly in Dublin.

Unlike other countries, Irish pirate stations were almost always on land, with publicly available phone numbers and addresses, advertising and known presenters. A recent government crackdown now means Ireland has one of the most hardline anti-pirate policies in Europe, and few major stations survive.

Stations nowadays are usually FM-based. In the 1980s however, most major stations broadcast on both MW and FM. There have also been several shortwave pirate stations in Ireland, but pirate shortwave broadcasting has declined greatly, as with SW broadcasting in general. The early pioneering pirates were usually MW only. One of the first stations was Radio Milinda which broadcast on 300Mtrs MW. It was the very first radio station to be raided and prosecuted. It was raided on the 17/12/1972 and the subsequent court case took place on the 08/02/1973. They were fined £2. each and all the equipment was confiscated.

Contents

Pirate radio today

In 2002 a new radio regulation body, the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg), was founded by the Irish government to replace the Office of the Director of Telecommunications Regulation (ODTR). Part of the reason for the change was pressure from the licenced radio community, which felt that pirate operators were taking their listeners, and that a level playing field needed to be restored.

ComReg had much more funding, staff and resources than its predecessor – and these were put to use in May 2003, when a major crackdown on Dublin pirates saw virtually every station wiped off the band. This series of raids, which was conducted over two days and involved Garda Síochána officers and ESB staff, was referred to as "Black Tuesday" by the free radio community.

Follow-up action in the years to come meant that any station that ventured on air usually didn't last that long – with the officials often tracking down and closing operators sometimes within five working days. The hardline stance has also been extended to other pirate heartlands such as Cork, Limerick and the border counties. For the first time, ComReg began to carry out raids at night and weekends – removing the only remaining "safe" time to broadcast without a licence.

Today Ireland has few pirate stations. In Dublin a couple venture on air mainly at the weekends, using low power. Outside Dublin there are a few larger, full-time operators left, but they generally don't tend to last long. Stations which operate intermittently, or regularly change name and/or location tend to survive longer (many have never been raided) although obviously have more difficulty building up a substantial listenership and hence are perceived as being less of a threat to the licenced stations.

ComReg's policy has come under criticism from many in the radio industry, who believe that the organisation should focus its resources on stations which cause interference, rather than simply carrying out blanket raids on all stations. These critics point out that while a mechanism has been put in place to remove pirates within a week, little has been done to free up the procedures for starting a licenced radio station. They call for a more tolerant attitude towards benevolent pirates, until a framework is introduced to allow niche stations to be set up and run at low cost with less strict regulation.

Many of the remaining stations are so-called "Border Blasters", which operate from just inside the Republic of Ireland, in counties Cavan, Donegal and Monaghan and broadcasting with directional antennas in to Northern Ireland. These stations had been generally more tolerated by Comreg/ODTR/DOC due to the broadcasts being aimed across the border, and not taking advertising or listenership to a significant degree from stations licenced by the BCI. However in recent years the main border pirates have been the target of repeated raids, with the largest stations forced off-air. A significant increase in the number of legal FM radio stations in Northern Ireland and increased cross-border co-operation between COMREG and the UK's OFCOM has led to this increased action towards the 'Border Blasters'

In some cases, the issuing of licences to new stations to broadcast in a genre traditionally served by pirate radio has led to local pirates closing down as their listeners, staff and advertisers move to the licenced station. In Dublin, Spin 1038 took much of the youth-oriented audience and Dublin's Country Mix 106.8 took from country music pirates.

An addition to pirate radio, particularly in the late 1990s has been a number of Catholic churches, particularly in rural areas, who broadcast their services at the high frequency end of the FM band, or on frequencies around 27 MHz (an arrangement not permitted by legal 27 MHz CB) for parishioners who cannot attend personally. The high end of the FM band was favoured by church broadcasters using the domestic FM band, as this was mostly unused for legal stations outside Dublin and Cork. The church broadcasters were largely ignored until 2006 when Comreg contacted a number of churches warning them to stop the transmissions, and claimed the broadcasts were suspected of interfering with airband frequencies. (A few months after this move the high end of the FM band became populated by transmitters for the almost national roll-out of Newstalk radio, which previously broadcast to Dublin only). The 2006 controversy made international news, after the issue was aired on RTÉ's Liveline radio show. Shortly afterwards the authorities introduced a new licence scheme (similar to one in the UK) that would allow a frequency band just above the legal 27 MHz CB band to be used for this purpose. Listeners would have to purchase scanners or other special receivers capable of receiving 27.5–28 MHz. Another form of religious broadcast to appear in Ireland in the 1990s was the many FM and AM relays of the UK based UCB (United Christian Broadcasters) and to a lesser extent the related CrossRhythms station from satellite. However these re-broadcasts have now mostly ceased.

Unlicensed radio was just getting back up to speed in Dublin but on Friday 13 April 2007 an apparent raid by Comreg on a two year old Dublin Pirate station "Fun FM" has sparked fear into the pirate community. Other stations have apparently received warnings too and long running youth dance station Pulse FM 94.6 have decided to call it a day and closed down that same Friday at 8.45pm.But that was only to change their name to Dance fm 94.6 by doing this com reg would have to set up a whole new investigation.

Galaxy FM 91.6 Ceased broadcasting on the final week of September 2007, for a reason which is unsure. The station's Bebo Profile says "due to reasons out of our control" which could indicate a raid, possibly due to Galaxy not being able to keep operations secretive. Galaxy offered a strong line up of presenters from ex-pirates such as Pulse, Club, Capital and Freedom FM.

Notable stations

Radio Dublin

Radio Dublin started in 1966, and peaked in the mid 1990s, broadcasting on MW, SW and FM simultaneously. After Eamonn Cooke took over, Radio Dublin had ever increasing ambitions. It was the first radio station in the Republic of Ireland to complete a 24 hour broadcast, this on the occasion of the Irish general election of June 1977. The "marathon" broadcast over the following Christmas, of at least 185 hours was history in the making leading the way into really a new world of 1978. It was for many years accepted as just another radio station, with little being known about its lack of a licence. Its output changed constantly, depending on who was managing it. The station ceased fulltime operation after the jailing of the station's then owner Eamonn Cooke for unrelated sex offences[1]. Radio Dublin closed down in May 2003 and has never returned.

Here is a list of some of the people involved with Radio Dublin over the years:

  • Ken Sheehan - station founder;
  • Roger Lloyd, aka Prince Terry - one of the originals with RD;
  • Don Moore, aka Doctor Don;
  • Debbie Moore;
  • Derek Jones;
  • Paul Vincent;
  • Dave C;
  • Declan Meehan – East Coast FM, Today FM;
  • Simon Maher – general manager, Phantom FM;
  • Ger Rowe (Radio Dublin Channel 2) – chief executive, Phantom FM;
  • Pat Jennings (Radio Dublin Channel 2);
  • Ray Jackson (Radio Dublin Channel 2) - one of the people behind temporary licence runs of Premier FM and Christmas FM;
  • Mike Doyle (Radio Dublin Channel 2);
  • Vincent Hughes (Radio Dublin Channel 2);
  • Steve Conway – some-time deejay with Phantom FM and writer;
  • John Clarke – 2FM (former Head);
  • Steve K – Spin 103;
  • Barry Dunne – Dublin's 98;
  • John Bowe - LMFM;
  • Chris Murray – LMFM;
  • Marty Whelan - RTE and Lyric FM;
  • Martin King - Today FM and TV3;
  • Dave Fanning – rock dj on RD; 2FM and RTE;
  • Joe Doyle – temporary licence runs for IMR/ICMR/Hot Country;
  • Tracy Lee – former Today FM presenter ("Nothing but Nineties");
  • Les Vickers – former RTE Radio 1 presenter, and, also, temporary-licenced Zenith Classic Rock;
  • Gareth O'Callaghan – 4FM;
  • Aidan Cooney – Q102 and TV3;
  • Barry Lang – former 2FM deejay;
  • John O'Hara;
  • Pat James - rock dj;
  • DJ Lee;
  • Kevin Barrett;
  • Graham Turner;
  • Ian Walker;
  • Maurice Nevins;
  • Alan Hunter;
  • Bernard Evans;
  • Chris Canning;
  • Adrian St. Juste;
  • Mark Manning;
  • Gerry Moore;
  • Brendan Kilkenny
  • Keith Shanley - Former Presenter KLAS,CKR, KFM, PD & Breakfast Show Country Mix, Breakfast Show Christmas FM 08 & 09

Radio Milinda

Radio Milinda started Broadcasting early in 1972. It was the first pirate radio station to be raided and prosecuted in the republic of Ireland. On the 17 December 1972 a large contingent of police raided Radio Milinda and seven people were arrested. They were fined £2 each and all equipment and media was confiscated. It was founded by Jimmy McCabe, Jimmy Lynch and Richie Kearns. Very shortly after the first transmissions they were joined by Declan Meehan, Mark Storey and Michael Lynch. Radio Milinda broadcast on 300Mtrs M.W. Radio Milinda was believed to have been of the most professional sounding stations of the day having a broad listener base in Ireland as well as the UK

Sunshine Radio and Radio Nova "The Super Pirates"

Sunshine Radio was the first of the so-called Super Pirate radio stations in the Republic of Ireland and commenced broadcasting on September 9, 1980 from studios in the Sands Hotel, Portmarnock, County Dublin. It was the longest operating of the major stations. Sunshine closed at the end of 1988 having achieved the highest ratings of any Dublin radio station to this day. Their head office was in JWT House in Baggot Street in the heart of the city's commercial district. Sunshine Radio was set up by former Radio Caroline men Chris Cary, Robbie Robinson, aka Robbie Dale, and ex-BBC broadcast engineer Jimmy White with some financial support from one of Radio Caroline's partners Philip Soloman. Shortly after making its first test transmissions the stations main aerial tower was vandalised and subsequently collapsed. Cary and Soloman backed out of the venture and sold to Dale only weeks after the station opened. Sunshine Radio started on 531 kHz (announced as 539 to rhyme with Sunshine) medium wave, adding an FM service a year later. Chris Cary went on to start Radio Nova in the following year, 1981, with studios in Herbert Street, Dublin. Nova was the first major Irish pirate to commence with FM, on 88.1 MHz. The station added an AM frequency at a later stage which varied between 819 kHz, 828 kHz 846 kHz and 738 kHz. After the success of Radio Nova on FM, Robbie Robinson broadcast Sunshine at high power on 101 MHz, and renamed the station Sunshine 101. Nova ran until 1986 when Chris Cary closed the station following a dispute with the National Union of Journalists. Other stations came on air like Q102 some claiming a Cary connection like NRG 103 (some thought that "NRG" was an abbreviation for "Nova Radio Group"), but the name sounded like Energy 103 and Power FM, but none were able to come near to the Nova or Sunshine success. Sunshine 101 dominated the Dublin radio market until it closed down at the end of December 1988 in compliance with the new Broadcasting & Wireless Telegraphy act, which had come into effect at midnight on December 31 that year. Many of the present day stars of Irish broadcasting are proud to acknowledge their early days as part of the teams to came out of Sunshine and Nova.

The stations provided 24 hour music, with hourly news updates to Dublin City and County. The stations were raided only once, in 1983, leaving Nova off the air for less than a week and Sunshine a little longer because it waited for the District Court to order the return of its equipment confiscated in the raid. Pirate radio had a very noticeable impact on both listener figures and the advertising revenue of RTÉ, which could resort only to frequency jamming of the Nova and Sunshine MW & FM transmitters to try to reduce listenership. The Irish communications minister ordered the then chairman of RTÉ Fred O'Donovan to stop the illegal jamming campaign.

Well-known names in radio associated with the superpirates Sunshine Radio, Radio Nova, Nova's sister stations, Magic 103, Q102 or Energy 103 include: now retired broadcaster Bob Gallicoe, 2FM's Colm Hayes and John Clarke, Today FM's Tom Hardy, Phil Cawley and Tony Fenton, FM104's Dave Kelly, 4FM deejay Brian McColl, licensed Q102's Scott Williams, Jason Maine, Liam Coburn and Aidan Cooney, Dublin's Country Mix 106.8's David Dennehy and Greg Gaughren (also with East Coast FM), Radio 1's John Kenny, East Coast FM's Declan Meehan (also on Sundays on Today FM), 4FM's Gareth O'Callaghan (ex-2FM and Galway Bay FM) and David Harvey, and Jim Cotter of Philadelphia's WRTI. TV would include RTÉ News and Sports' Brian Dobson, Anna Cassin, Ken Hammond and Eamonn Falvey and TV3's Aidan Cooney (also on Q102), Martin King (also on Today FM) and Andrew O'Hanlon.

Smaller Stations of the late '70s, early '80s

Other memorable pirate stations in Dublin included Radio Dublin, Capitol Radio, Big D, Radio City, TTTR and ARD (Alternative Radio Dublin), Amongst the DJs at the Big D were Chris Wilkinson and Dennis Murray. Well-known names on radio and television that went through these smaller stations would include many of those who would go on to superpirates as listed above, but also people who left the pirate scene just before the superpirates emerged such as Marty Whelan, Gerry Ryan, Dave Fanning, Ian Dempsey and Robbie Irwin.

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Cork

CBC(Cork Broadcasting Company)was the first pirate station in Cork in 1978. Dj's were Dj Daniel, Mark Bell, Rob Jones, Tony Allen, Noel Evans,Domino,Susan James,Geoff Harris, Jim Lockhart.

In Cork the big stations were ERI (1982–1988) and the original (1982–1984) South Coast Radio. ERI unsuccessfully applied for a commercial licence in the area in 1989 under the name 'Sound of the South'. Subsequently its studio and transmission facilities were leased to a new licensed station, the then 'Radio South' in 1989, allowing this new station to come on air relatively quickly. Radio South was relaunched in July 1990 as 96FM and eventually bought out by County Sound in February 1991 with the original 4 shareholders selling all their shares to the Mallow based station. Outside of Cork city in County Cork, the two most significant stations during the 1980s were the Bandon-based WKLR, and NCCR (North Cork Community Radio), which broadcast from the old Majestic Ballroom in Mallow. WKLR (West Cork Local Radio) founded in 1984, initially intended for the West Cork area, but towards the end of the station's life had extended its transmission to cover Cork city and much of the rest of Co. Cork. The close-down night of NCCR in Mallow on the 31st December 1988 was struck by tragedy, when local farmer and former presenter and shareholder of the station – Pat O'Connor – who was participating in an interview – collapsed and died suddenly during a commercial break. The station immediately announced it was closing earlier than planned "due to unforeseen circumstances". Pat O'Connor had also been a brief national celebrity was he was chosen as a representative of rural Ireland to guest present an edition of the 'Saturday Live' chat show on RTÉ TV in 1987, however his RTÉ appearance meant he had to resign his involvement in the pirate NCCR to avoid controversy beforehand, and did not appear on NCCR again until the closedown night. NCCR had come into being in 1985 when a community co-operative took over the ownership of a previous station – NCLR (North Cork Local Radio) that had been in existence since 1981. Another well remembered pirate station in County Cork was Community Radio Youghal (CRY), whose existence, (like NCLR in Mallow) was ironically inspired by a stint in the town of RTÉ's mobile community radio station (which provided temporary community radio services during visits to dozens of towns nationwide in the 1980s). CRY had been on air for almost a decade and was one of the longest surviving pirates in Ireland when it closed at the end of 1988. CRY returned to the airwaves (with a licence) years later in 1995. The 90's also saw the birth of one of Cork's most memorable pirate stations, Radio Friendly. Radio Friendly provided Corkonians with music from the "Underground" DJs of Cork, some from the infamous Sir Henry's nightclub at the time and its DJs included Stevie G and Greg & Shane of Fish Go Deep. The station got its name from its owners MR P, Miss Ken D and some Djs from Dublins Power FM. The original transmitter was the original Power 98.7FM equipment. Another big station in the late 90s early 00's was Kiss 105.5FM (run by Tom Donegan) which had a more commercial side than Radio Friendly and was aimed at a younger audience, such DJs such as Colin Edwards, Damien Sreenan, Dave Newman and Derek O Keefe were regulars on this, it closed down in 2001. The main pirate station in Cork nowadays is another Kiss (run by WKD aka Bossman), but they have been the subject of much Comreg attention and have been raided several times having broadcasting equipment confiscated. The most recent relaunch of Kiss 94.8 lasted only 3 weeks with the station being raided once again (13/08/2008 13:00) and all equipment was confiscated while off air. This is believed to be due to the poularity of the station which poses a financial threat to other licencsed broadcasters in the area. Early in 2009 Kiss returned to a new frequency of 106.5, in which they were broadcasting since 2006. This was over-rided by a City Pirate called Pulse FM which had taken the frequency back, which they were broadcasting since 2005. Kiss was stuck in a deep grave at this time, and found a near frequency at the lower end of the band, 87.8, the former frequency of Galaxy FM with the same owners of Pulse FM who had returned onto the airwaves. Kiss is still living on to this day, 19/9/2009, with such a high demand for the radio pirate by the younger audience, there is no end to Kiss. Kiss now Broadcasting on 88.7

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Galway

Galway's first pirate radio station was Saor Raidió Chonamara (Free Radio Conemara) which first came on the air during Oireachtas na Gaeilge 1968 as a direct response to the Irish government's inaction over Irish language broadcasting. The station used a medium wave transmitter surreptitiously imported from the Netherlands. The Irish government responded by proposing a national Irish-language radio station RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta which came on the air on Easter Sunday 1972. Its headquarters are now in Casla, Co. Galway. A pop-format pirate radio station, Independent Radio Galway, staffed mostly by local university students, began broadcasting from a studio off Shop Street, Galway City, in summer 1978, and remained intermittently on the air, despite halfhearted raids by Gardaí, until the early 1980s.

In 1983 Radio Renmore took to the airwaves founded by Gary Hardiman. Snowflake radio followed the Christmas of that year and in the summer of 1984 Renmore Local Radio (RLR) was born fronted by Gary Hardiman and presenter Brian Walsh. With its Galway-accented jingles advertising the station's presence on 199metres MW, the station was a great local success. The station was nevertheless supplanted in 1984 by the professionally-backed Atlantic Sound broadcasting from Forster Street, which later became Atlantic 10–26 home of the Hit with talent like Don Stevens, Keith York, Brian Walsh, Richie O Shea & Steve Marshal and WLS (which stood for 'West Local Station') in 1985, and also Coast 103 in 1987–1989. County Sound Radio began broadcasting from Tuam in North Galway on March 17, 1987 bringing a different sound to the local radio scene. It appealed to a mixed adult audience and featured the Alfasound jinglepack of County Sound Radio in Surrey UK. County Sound Radio moved to Galway City early in 1988 and broadcast live 24 hours per day until December 31, 1988 when the then Minister for Communications Ray Burke introduced new legislation aimed at suppressing pirate stations [1]. These CHR/AC stations, mostly headed and staffed by professional broadcasters with experience in Israel, the United States, and Ireland and Britain, brought the concept of community-based pirate radio in Galway to an end (with the exception of NUIG College Campus Radio, FlirtFM) , but heralded a more professional local radio format which survives in the legally-broadcasting Galway Bay FM, which came on the air in 1989 (Broadcast as "Radio West" 1989–93). Other stations in Galway during the 1980s included KFM and Emerald Radio in the city where Gary Hardiman and Brian Walsh showed up again. Candy FM in Ballinasloe and GDR in Loughrea. After 1989 there was very little pirate activity in the city with the exception of Quincentinial Radio and Radio Friendly (both short lived) and the more enduring (but intermittant) Radio Pirate Woman. In late 2007 a new licenced radio station began broadcasting in Galway. I- Radio (I 102–104) has been hugely successful with young listeners.

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Waterford

Waterford was home to three long running stations – Suirside, ABC Radio and WLR-FM, the latter winning the franchise to run the legal station for the Waterford City and County area after the competition run in early 1989 (following the introduction of the Radio and Television Act, 1988). ABC Radio which began operation in the nearby coastal town Tramore in 1982 had a distinct UK flavour with many English DJs and a notably slicker high tempo style than the other two. ABC Radio moved to a new studio in Waterford City in 1984. WLR-FM was the first continuous broadcast operation in the City or County. Full-time broadcasting by WLR commenced in 1978 with the station initially being located at Killotteran, just outside the city. After a few months WLR suffered a raid by the authorities on the 28 November 1978, but quickly returned to the airwaves. WLR moved to studios in the city at Wellington street, and later moved to Georges street (next door to what became the original location of the licenced WLR FM. WLR would settle firmly into a middle of the road station complete with local news and chat. Suirside (which was a breakaway group from WLR) was unusual in that at one time it broadcast on Short Wave in addition to the usual FM and MW frequencies. In later years Suirside relaunched under the name 'Crystal City Sound'. A short time later the station relaunched again as NCR (Nolan Cahill Radio), NCR closed down on the 26 December 1988. The Co. Waterford town of Dungarvan also had a long running pirate community radio station 'DCR' during the 1980s. DCR ran from a music store called Ben O'Neill's which is still in existence.

In the late 1990s Waterford had one of the more significant pirate stations in the country at the time with the professionally run 'ABC Power 104', which targeted a youth audience. The station launched in December 1995, lasting until October 2001, and included some personnel from the original ABC radio of the 1980s. ABC Power 104 made the issue of a youth licence for the area an election issue in the Waterford constituency prior to the 1997 General Election, this included a petition signing campaign. Shortly afterwards the IRTC decided that the Southeast was to be chosen as a pilot for a youth regional licence, which subsequently was awarded to Beat 102–103. A number of former ABC Power 104 presenters went on to work for the new licenced youth station – including Niall Power, Andy McCloskey, Pete Windle and Ray Colclough.

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Limerick

Limerick has had an amount of pirate radio stations over the years, however not many of these have had sufficient longevity to make a significant impact.

The biggest radio stations in the region from the late 70s to mid-80s were RLWE (Radio Limerick Weekly Echo), Raidio Luimni, Big L, and Hits 954.

Other reasonably-significant radio stations in the area over the years included CCR (City Centre Radio), Radio Vera, Radio Munster, SoundChannel and Mid-West Radio (a name since adopted somewhat confusingly by a legal radio station in Mayo, in the West of Ireland).

Following the biggest closedown of the pirates in Ireland in 1988, and the subsequent legalisation of local radio services in the country, many people viewed that the pirate era was consigned to the past, and Limerick became home to a single government-licensed service called Radio Limerick One which ironically later had its broadcasting licence revoked only to continue operating as a pirate station (RLO) for 10 years, being constantly raided and fined, finally ceasing transmission after 10 years early 2007 as owners and engineers ventured to other projects.

The inexplicable failure to offer more choice – Limerick had initially been earmarked for at least two stations – meant that inevitably a number of pirate stations reappeared, the biggest ones being Kiss FM (2000–2001), specialist dance station Touch 107, Radio Magic 107.6FM, Galtee Radio, Country Gold, Estuary, NCW 106, and Wave FM (2003), which later became Galaxy 105 (2004). There were also all-too-brief appearances of Q101, Power 98FM, Club FM, Fresh 103 and Enterprise Radio

XFM

XFM was seen as one of the grandads of operating pirates in Ireland, having run almost continuously since 1991, when it was called Alice's Restaurant; Although other stations such as Radio Star Country, shortwave pirate Jolly Roger Radio/Riverside Radio and EFR/Choice FM (Mayo) have been around longer. XFM plays mainly alternative and rock music.

Kiss 103FM

Kiss 103 FM launched in March 1993 with a powerful signal on 103.2 MHz. It was marked at the time as being the first 'commercial' pirate station to operate since the 'super pirates' of the 1980s. Kiss FM was unique amongst the pirates of the time in that it was heavily formatted and operated twenty four hours per day. With studios in Terenure in South West Dublin, the station linked via UHF links to transmitters at Kilakee in the Dublin mountains. The station was regarded at the time to have attracted the best of the talent from the burgeoning pirate scene – as well as several presenters who had worked on the pirate stations of the 1980s. The station was an instant success, attracting the wrath of commercial operators and the Government regulator. Over the course of its eight month existence, the station's signals were jammed repeatedly by FM104, one of the (then) only two licenced commercial operators for the Dublin area, and its various mountain transmitter sites were raided by the Department of Communications. Kiss 103 finally closed in November 1994. No station in the history of pirate radio in Ireland experienced as much Government action as did Kiss 103. The station's transmitter sites were raided four times in eight months, while it's studio site was raided on two occasions, resulting in losses of expensive broadcasting equipment.

Kiss 103 was said to have caused a change in the attitude of the Government and the commercial radio sector toward unlicenced radio; prior to its launch, a number of hobby pirates had operated with relative immunity – Radio Dublin, DLR 106, Sunset Radio, NSR, Coast FM, Kiss FM (which changed its name prior to the launch of Kiss 103, Radio Active and others. In the months after the closedown of Kiss 103, only three pirates remained on air in Dublin – Coast FM, Club FM (Dance) and DLR 106.

Freedom 92FM

This station broadcast for seven years, serving Dublin city and surrounding areas. Playing non-stop chart music, it was hugely successful, with a large youth audience and many high-profile DJs. It distinguished itself from other Dublin stations through its relaxed on-air approach, with presenters you could identify with, few advertisements and no news coverage to interrupt the music.

The station was removed from the air by the Black Tuesday raids in May 2003 (see Pirate radio today). Some Freedom DJs now work for licenced Dublin stations.

Ronan Devitt (CKRfm and fm104 - Currently RTE Pulse).

Louise Jordan (Currently FM104).

Ryan Phillips (Currently Spin1038).

Neil Kavanagh (Currently production engineer Newstalk).

Paul Dee (Currently Dublins 98).

Greg Browne (Kfm, Immedia UK, Spin1038, currently RTE Pulse and flying for Ryanair as a pilot).

Michael Hogan (Currently Dublins 98).

Darragh O'Dea (Currently Dublins 98).

Simon Davis (Currently broadcast engineer).

The Freedom website has been resurrected at http://www.freedom92fm.net

Pulse FM 103.2

Pulse FM began life as a garden shed based radio station, as with others in this list. However, Pulse was driven strongly by commercial forces from the beginning. On air from 1995 to 1999, its existence coincided with a population boom in the 18–25 year age bracket. Pulse derived much of its income from promoting underage and overage discos in suburban Dublin, and as promoters and operators, the station management made substantial sums from this as well as advertising DJ hire services. Filed accounts at the CRO (No. 288948) confirm the financial success of the station. Its backers invested heavily in CTE transmission and modulation equipment, producing a slick, clean FM sound, clearly received all over the Greater Dublin Area.

Pulse FM was characterised by professional, well spoken, south Dublin posh accented DJs contrasting with the majority of other Dublin pirates at the time. Heavily playlisted, slick voiceovers and jingle work all combined to make Pulse FM extremely successful.

Prior to its closure, Pulse FM's owners commissioned an 'independent' report which put Pulse on a par with currently licenced commercial stations such as FM104 and 98FM.

Pulse FM formed a consortium to apply for the new 'Youth Music' station licence, offered by the IRTC. However, this application was not successful.

Phantom FM

Phantom FM began broadcasting to Dublin in 1996 from a garden shed in Sandyford. (previously it had broadcast under various names including Spectrum FM from Ballybrack) Arguably one of the most successful Pirate stations of the 1990s, Phantom played mainly indie music which had a huge underground following in Dublin. This market which was completely ignored by the mainstream radio stations at the time which accounts for the success Phantom enjoyed. The unlicenced Phantom FM came to an end in the May 2003 crackdown on Dublin pirate radio stations. One of two transmitter sites used at the time by Phantom was raided by Comreg, however the studio in the city centre was untouched. Phantom briefly returned to the air on the Sunday afternoon following the raids, with a broadcast of its 'Anorak' programme, before finally closing as a pirate.

Phantom were notable that they were the first of post-1989 pirate stations to broadcast legally in Ireland when the Broadcasting Commission of Ireland awarded temporary licences on 2 occasions to the station. Phantom subsequently won the competition for an Alternative Music licence in November 2004, but due to legal challenges from one of the losing consortia (Zed FM/scrollside FM), it only went on air at the end of October 2006 with its new licence. Claims by the consortium, backed by Bob Geldof, Hot Press owner Niall Stokes and businessman Dermot Hanrahan, that Phantom's application benefited from their years of illegal broadcasting and a claimed infringement with its temporary licences were rejected.

Phantom has had a mixture of very experienced pirate broadcasters and some new talent during its different phases from unlicensed broadcasting right up to its current permanent licensed state. The Chief Executive Ger Rowe goes back to Radio Dublin Channel 2, circa 1982. General Manager Simon Maher had built up experience in a few pirates, starting in 1990 with Radio Dublin, and was the key figure in setting up Coast FM from his garden shed in Ballybrack. Steve Conway (presenter of Randon Access on Sundays), who goes back to '80s pirates, has the distinction of having been involved in the most famous off-shore pirate Radio Caroline during the late '80s and the '90s.

Other stations

During the 1990s the majority of pirate stations ran a dance music format with Galaxy 107, Energy 106, Sunset, NSR 105, Kiss 103, Club FM and later Pulse 103 battling for supremacy and enjoying short spells at the top of the pile in Dublin. Leading Dublin non-dance pirates included Coast FM, DLR/Hits 106 and Freedom FM.

The following deejays or broadcasters are just some examples of those who had involvement with some of the stations listed above: Simon Maher (Phantom), Steve K (Spin 103), Barry Dunne (98FM), Tracey Lee (Today FM), Chris Murray (LMFM),Enda Caldwell(Radio Luxembourg), Mr Spring (2FM), James Davids (Spin 1038), Damien McCaul (Q102), Al Gibbs (FM104), Tony Dixon (FM104), Nikki Hayes (2FM) and Declan Pearse (98FM).

Outside Dublin most activity was to be found in the border regions although Cork, Limerick, Waterford as well as smaller towns like Castlebar, Tralee, Wexford and Enniscorthy all had varying levels of pirate activity through this period

Offshore Radio

While offshore pirates were rarer in Ireland, they still existed, and many notable UK offshore stations had a connection with Ireland. Both Radio Atlanta and Radio Caroline were built on board ships which were docked in a private Irish port at Greenore in the Republic of Ireland. The Dutch stations Radio Parajids and REM island were also fitted out in Irish ports while Laser 558 had some Irish staff and financial backing. Another offshore station located at various locations off the coast of Scotland in international waters, later identified itself as Radio Scotland and Ireland when its radio ship moved to anchorage off the west coast and within range of Ireland (for a time they anchored off Northern Ireland). During the mid 1960s there were unconfirmed reports of test broadcasts from Irish offshore stations like "Radio Shannon" and "Radio Lambay" but such transmissions if they ever took place were probably the work of landbased radio enthusiasts. Some UK offshore stations, particularly Radio Scotland and Radio Caroline North had a following in Ireland.

Northern Ireland

During the early 1970s there were several political "clandestine" stations operated by various nationalist and loyalist organisations however most of these were short lived. Later there were several attempts to establish commercial pirates in NI but the authorities quickly moved against these too. (Penalties for pirate broadcasting under UK law were a lot harsher than in Ireland.) Some of these stations subsequently moved across the border and broadcast into Northern Ireland from the Republic.

At one point there were over 15 stations doing so. Surprisingly there were only a handful of (mostly short lived) "political" stations South of the border as it was felt that the authorities were less likely to be tolerant of such stations. The longest running illegal station in Northern Ireland was Belfast's Irish language station "Raidió Fáilte" (lit. "Radio Welcome") in 2005 the authorities decided to licence Radio Failte. Such an action which would have been unthinkable before the Northern Ireland Peace Process

KISS FM

Kiss 106 launched from Dundalk in November 1998 and has continued under various guises as such until the present day with some short breaks in service. Wild Country, 106.6 The Frog and Lite 101.5 FM are all part of the Eye Media Group and have also operated alongside Kiss 106 as sister stations since around 2003. Currently Kiss FM is back on the air on 101.6 103.9 & 104.2 FM as Feel Good Radio. [2]

Storm 106 was a breakaway from Kiss 106 Dundalk by one of the original shareholders of Kiss 106 launching in 2002 and still on air to this present day as [3] an online dance station with a similar format to the old Nitetime programming from 7pm to 7am Kiss 106 of 1999.

See also

References

External links


Pirate radio in Ireland has had a long history, with hundreds of stations having operated from within the country. Due to past lax enforcement of the rules, the lack of commercial radio until 1989, and the small physical size of the country, pirate radio has proliferated up to recent years. They were tolerated by the government which only occasionally raided them in an effort to show compliance with Irish law, although the national broadcaster, RTÉ, took a harsher approach, including radio jamming.

Whilst the number of recorded pirate radio stations was in the hundreds, only a few have been notable enough to be remembered. This is because at different stages, pirate stations were the mainstay of radio listenership, particularly in Dublin.

Unlike other countries, Irish pirate stations were almost always on land, with publicly available phone numbers and addresses, advertising and known presenters. A recent government crackdown now means Ireland has one of the most hardline anti-pirate policies in Europe, and few major stations survive.

Stations nowadays are usually FM-based. In the 1980s however, most major stations broadcast on both MW and FM. There have also been several shortwave pirate stations in Ireland, but pirate shortwave broadcasting has declined greatly, as with SW broadcasting in general. The early pioneering pirates were usually MW only. One of the first stations was Radio Milinda which broadcast on 300Mtrs MW. It was the very first radio station to be raided and prosecuted. It was raided on the 17/12/1972 and the subsequent court case took place on the 08/02/1973. They were fined £2. each and all the equipment was confiscated.

Contents

Pirate radio today

In 2002 a new radio regulation body, the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg), was founded by the Irish government to replace the Office of the Director of Telecommunications Regulation (ODTR). Part of the reason for the change was pressure from the licenced radio community, which felt that pirate operators were taking their listeners, and that a level playing field needed to be restored.

ComReg had much more funding, staff and resources than its predecessor – and these were put to use in May 2003, when a major crackdown on Dublin pirates saw virtually every station wiped off the band. This series of raids, which was conducted over two days and involved Garda Síochána officers and ESB staff, was referred to as "Black Tuesday" by the free radio community.

Follow-up action in the years to come meant that any station that ventured on air usually didn't last that long – with the officials often tracking down and closing operators sometimes within five working days. The hardline stance has also been extended to other pirate heartlands such as Cork, Limerick and the border counties. For the first time, ComReg began to carry out raids at night and weekends – removing the only remaining "safe" time to broadcast without a licence.

Today Ireland has few pirate stations. In Dublin a couple venture on air mainly at the weekends, using low power. Outside Dublin there are a few larger, full-time operators left, but they generally don't tend to last long. Stations which operate intermittently, or regularly change name and/or location tend to survive longer (many have never been raided) although obviously have more difficulty building up a substantial listenership and hence are perceived as being less of a threat to the licenced stations.

ComReg's policy has come under criticism from many in the radio industry, who believe that the organisation should focus its resources on stations which cause interference, rather than simply carrying out blanket raids on all stations. These critics point out that while a mechanism has been put in place to remove pirates within a week, little has been done to free up the procedures for starting a licenced radio station. They call for a more tolerant attitude towards benevolent pirates, until a framework is introduced to allow niche stations to be set up and run at low cost with less strict regulation.

Many of the remaining stations are so-called "Border Blasters", which operate from just inside the Republic of Ireland, in counties Cavan, Donegal and Monaghan and broadcasting with directional antennas in to Northern Ireland. These stations had been generally more tolerated by Comreg/ODTR/DOC due to the broadcasts being aimed across the border, and not taking advertising or listenership to a significant degree from stations licenced by the BCI. However in recent years the main border pirates have been the target of repeated raids, with the largest stations forced off-air. A significant increase in the number of legal FM radio stations in Northern Ireland and increased cross-border co-operation between COMREG and the UK's OFCOM has led to this increased action towards the 'Border Blasters'

In some cases, the issuing of licences to new stations to broadcast in a genre traditionally served by pirate radio has led to local pirates closing down as their listeners, staff and advertisers move to the licenced station. In Dublin, Spin 1038 took much of the youth-oriented audience and Dublin's Country Mix 106.8 took from country music pirates.

An addition to pirate radio, particularly in the late 1990s has been a number of Catholic churches, particularly in rural areas, who broadcast their services at the high frequency end of the FM band, or on frequencies around 27 MHz (an arrangement not permitted by legal 27 MHz CB) for parishioners who cannot attend personally. The high end of the FM band was favoured by church broadcasters using the domestic FM band, as this was mostly unused for legal stations outside Dublin and Cork. The church broadcasters were largely ignored until 2006 when Comreg contacted a number of churches warning them to stop the transmissions, and claimed the broadcasts were suspected of interfering with airband frequencies. (A few months after this move the high end of the FM band became populated by transmitters for the almost national roll-out of Newstalk radio, which previously broadcast to Dublin only). The 2006 controversy made international news, after the issue was aired on RTÉ's Liveline radio show. Shortly afterwards the authorities introduced a new licence scheme (similar to one in the UK) that would allow a frequency band just above the legal 27 MHz CB band to be used for this purpose. Listeners would have to purchase scanners or other special receivers capable of receiving 27.5–28 MHz. Another form of religious broadcast to appear in Ireland in the 1990s was the many FM and AM relays of the UK based UCB (United Christian Broadcasters) and to a lesser extent the related CrossRhythms station from satellite. However these re-broadcasts have now mostly ceased.

Unlicensed radio was just getting back up to speed in Dublin but on Friday 13 April 2007 an apparent raid by Comreg on a two year old Dublin Pirate station "Fun FM" has sparked fear into the pirate community. Other stations have apparently received warnings too and long running youth dance station Pulse FM 94.6 have decided to call it a day and closed down that same Friday at 8.45pm.But that was only to change their name to Dance fm 94.6 by doing this com reg would have to set up a whole new investigation.

Galaxy FM 91.6 Ceased broadcasting on the final week of September 2007, for a reason which is unsure. The station's Bebo Profile says "due to reasons out of our control" which could indicate a raid, possibly due to Galaxy not being able to keep operations secretive. Galaxy offered a strong line up of presenters from ex-pirates such as Pulse, Club, Capital and Freedom FM.

Notable stations

Radio Dublin

Radio Dublin started in 1966, and peaked in the late 70s and up unto the early 80s until the arrival of Radio Nova and Sunshine radio whose professionalism and quality stereo reception left the station a drift in their wake in the subsequent years. Broadcasting on MW, SW and FM simultaneously. After Eamonn Cooke took over, Radio Dublin had ever increasing ambitions. It was the first radio station in the Republic of Ireland to complete a 24 hour broadcast, this on the occasion of the Irish general election of June 1977. The "marathon" broadcast over the following Christmas, of at least 185 hours was history in the making leading the way into really a new world of 1978. It was for many years accepted as just another radio station, with little being known about its lack of a licence. The station ceased fulltime operation after the jailing of the station's then owner Eamonn Cooke for unrelated sex offences[1]. Radio Dublin closed down in May 2003 and has never returned.

Here is a list of some of the people involved with Radio Dublin over the years:

  • Ken Sheehan - station founder;
  • Roger Lloyd, aka Prince Terry - one of the originals with RD;
  • Don Moore, aka Doctor Don;
  • Debbie Moore;
  • Derek Jones;
  • Paul Vincent;
  • Pat Gill;
  • Dave C; (now deceased- R.I.P)
  • Declan Meehan – East Coast FM, Today FM;
  • Simon Maher – general manager, Phantom FM;
  • Ger Rowe (Radio Dublin Channel 2) – chief executive, Phantom FM;
  • Pat Jennings (Radio Dublin Channel 2);
  • Ray Jackson (Radio Dublin Channel 2) - one of the people behind temporary licence runs of Premier FM and Christmas FM;
  • Mike Doyle (Radio Dublin Channel 2);
  • Vincent Hughes (Radio Dublin Channel 2);
  • Steve Conway – some-time deejay with Phantom FM and writer;
  • John Clarke – 2FM (former Head);
  • Steve K – Spin 103;
  • Barry Dunne – Dublin's 98;
  • John Bowe - LMFM;
  • Chris Murray – LMFM;
  • Marty Whelan - RTÉ and Lyric FM;
  • Phil Cawley - Today FM;
  • Martin King - Today FM and TV3;
  • Dave Fanning – rock DJ on RD; 2FM and RTÉ;
  • Joe Doyle – temporary licence runs for IMR/ICMR/Hot Country;
  • Tracy Lee – former Today FM presenter ("Nothing but Nineties");
  • Les Vickers – former RTÉ Radio 1 presenter, and, also, temporary-licenced Zenith Classic Rock;
  • Gareth O'Callaghan – 4FM;
  • Aidan Jay - Aidan Cooney Q102 and TV3;
  • Keith Shanley - Former Presenter Radio West, KLAS,CKR, KFM, PD & Breakfast Show Country Mix, Breakfast Show Christmas FM 08 & 09;
  • Paul Saunders - KFM;
  • Barry Lang – former 2FM deejay who left to pursue a career as an airline pilot;
  • John O'Hara;
  • James Martin - playwright Jimmy Murphy (Brothers of the brush, Kings of the Kilburn High Rd);
  • Pat James - rock DJ;
  • DJ Lee;
  • Kevin Barrett;
  • Graham Turner;
  • Ian Walker;
  • Maurice Nevins;
  • Alan Hunter; - Former Kiss FM, Heartbeat, Radio Nova, Easy 103.
  • Bernard Evans;
  • Chris Canning;
  • Adrian St. James "The Big Bopper"
  • Mark Manning;
  • Brendan Kilkenny

Radio Milinda

Radio Milinda started Broadcasting early in 1972. It was the first pirate radio station to be raided and prosecuted in the republic of Ireland. On the 17 December 1972 a large contingent of police raided Radio Milinda and seven people were arrested. They were fined £2 each and all equipment and media was confiscated. It was founded by Jimmy McCabe, Jimmy Lynch and Richie Kearns. Very shortly after the first transmissions they were joined by Declan Meehan, Mark Storey and Michael Lynch. Radio Milinda broadcast on 300Mtrs M.W. Radio Milinda was believed to have been of the most professional sounding stations of the day having a broad listener base in Ireland as well as the UK

Sunshine Radio and Radio Nova "The Super Pirates"

Sunshine Radio was the first of the so-called Super Pirate radio stations in the Republic of Ireland and commenced broadcasting on September 9, 1980 from studios in the Sands Hotel, Portmarnock, County Dublin. It was the longest operating of the major stations. Sunshine closed at the end of 1988 having achieved the highest ratings of any Dublin radio station to this day. Their head office was in JWT House in Baggot Street in the heart of the city's commercial district. Sunshine Radio was set up by former Radio Caroline men Chris Cary, Robbie Robinson, aka Robbie Dale, and ex-BBC broadcast engineer Jimmy White with some financial support from one of Radio Caroline's partners Philip Soloman. Shortly after making its first test transmissions the stations main aerial tower was vandalised and subsequently collapsed. Cary and Soloman backed out of the venture and sold to Dale only weeks after the station opened. Sunshine Radio started on 531 kHz (announced as 539 to rhyme with Sunshine) medium wave, adding an FM service a year later. Chris Cary went on to start Radio Nova in the following year, 1981, with studios in Herbert Street, Dublin. Nova was the first major Irish pirate to commence with FM, on 88.1 MHz. The station added an AM frequency at a later stage which varied between 819 kHz, 828 kHz 846 kHz and 738 kHz. After the success of Radio Nova on FM, Robbie Robinson broadcast Sunshine at high power on 101 MHz, and renamed the station Sunshine 101. Nova ran until 1986 when Chris Cary closed the station following a dispute with the National Union of Journalists. Other stations came on air like Q102 some claiming a Cary connection like NRG 103 (some thought that "NRG" was an abbreviation for "Nova Radio Group"), but the name sounded like Energy 103 and Power FM, but none were able to come near to the Nova or Sunshine success. Sunshine 101 dominated the Dublin radio market until it closed down at the end of December 1988 in compliance with the new Broadcasting & Wireless Telegraphy act, which had come into effect at midnight on December 31 that year. Many of the present day stars of Irish broadcasting are proud to acknowledge their early days as part of the teams to came out of Sunshine and Nova.

The stations provided 24 hour music, with hourly news updates to Dublin City and County. The stations were raided only once, in 1983, leaving Nova off the air for less than a week and Sunshine a little longer because it waited for the District Court to order the return of its equipment confiscated in the raid. Pirate radio had a very noticeable impact on both listener figures and the advertising revenue of RTÉ, which could resort only to frequency jamming of the Nova and Sunshine MW & FM transmitters to try to reduce listenership. The Irish communications minister ordered the then chairman of RTÉ Fred O'Donovan to stop the illegal jamming campaign.

Well-known names in radio associated with the superpirates Sunshine Radio, Radio Nova, Nova's sister stations, Magic 103, Q102 or Energy 103 include: now retired broadcaster Bob Gallicoe, 2FM's Colm Hayes and John Clarke, Today FM's Tom Hardy, Phil Cawley and Tony Fenton, FM104's Dave Kelly, 4FM deejay Brian McColl, Alan Hunter (now consulting in Broadcasting and online radio), licensed Q102's Scott Williams, Jason Maine, Liam Coburn and Aidan Cooney, Dublin's Country Mix 106.8's David Dennehy and Greg Gaughren (also with East Coast FM), Radio 1's John Kenny, East Coast FM's Declan Meehan (also on Sundays on Today FM), 4FM's Gareth O'Callaghan (ex-2FM and Galway Bay FM, David Harvey and Jim Cotter of Philadelphia's WRTI. TV would include RTÉ News and Sports' Brian Dobson, Anna Cassin, Ken Hammond and Eamonn Falvey and TV3's Aidan Cooney (also on Q102), Martin King (also on Today FM) and Andrew O'Hanlon.

Smaller Stations of the late '70s, early '80s

Other memorable pirate stations in Dublin included Radio Dublin, Capitol Radio, Big D, Radio City, TTTR and ARD (Alternative Radio Dublin), Amongst the DJs at the Big D were Chris Wilkinson and Dennis Murray. Well-known names on radio and television that went through these smaller stations would include many of those who would go on to superpirates as listed above, but also people who left the pirate scene just before the superpirates emerged such as Marty Whelan, Gerry Ryan, Dave Fanning, Ian Dempsey and Robbie Irwin.

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Cork

CBC (Cork Broadcasting Company) was the first pirate station in Cork in 1978. DJs were DJ Daniel, Mark Bell, Rob Jones, Tony Allen, Noel Evans, Domino,Susan James, Geoff Harris, Jim Lockhart. Also around 1978 were ABC Radio 233metres and Cork City Radio which transmitted on 199 meters. It later changed its name to CCLR 261.

In Cork the big stations were ERI (1982–1988) and the original (1982–1984) South Coast Radio. ERI unsuccessfully applied for a commercial licence in the area in 1989 under the name 'Sound of the South'. Subsequently its studio and transmission facilities were leased to a new licensed station, the then 'Radio South' in 1989, allowing this new station to come on air relatively quickly. Radio South was relaunched in July 1990 as 96FM and eventually bought out by County Sound in February 1991 with the original 4 shareholders selling all their shares to the Mallow based station. Outside of Cork city in County Cork, the two most significant stations during the 1980s were the Bandon-based WKLR, and NCCR (North Cork Community Radio), which broadcast from the old Majestic Ballroom in Mallow. (The licenced local station C103 (originally known as 'County Sound') is a direct descendant of the unlicenced NCCR). WKLR (West Cork Local Radio) founded in 1984, initially intended for the West Cork area, but towards the end of the station's life had extended its transmission to cover Cork city and much of the rest of Co. Cork. The close-down night of NCCR in Mallow on the 31st December 1988 was struck by tragedy, when local farmer and former presenter and shareholder of the station – Pat O'Connor – who was participating in an interview – collapsed and died suddenly during a commercial break. The station immediately announced it was closing earlier than planned "due to unforeseen circumstances". Pat O'Connor had also been a brief national celebrity was he was chosen as a representative of rural Ireland to guest present an edition of the 'Saturday Live' chat show on RTÉ TV in 1987, however his RTÉ appearance meant he had to resign his involvement in the pirate NCCR to avoid controversy beforehand, and did not appear on NCCR again until the closedown night. NCCR had come into being in 1985 when a community co-operative took over the ownership of a previous station – NCLR (North Cork Local Radio) that had been in existence since 1981. Another well remembered pirate station in County Cork was Community Radio Youghal (CRY), whose existence, (like NCLR in Mallow) was ironically inspired by a stint in the town of RTÉ's mobile community radio station (which provided temporary community radio services during visits to dozens of towns nationwide in the 1980s). CRY had been on air for almost a decade and was one of the longest surviving pirates in Ireland when it closed at the end of 1988. CRY returned to the airwaves (with a licence) years later in 1995. The 90's also saw the birth of one of Cork's most memorable pirate stations, Radio Friendly. Radio Friendly provided Corkonians with music from the "Underground" DJs of Cork, some from the infamous Sir Henry's nightclub at the time and its DJs included Stevie G and Greg & Shane of Fish Go Deep. The station got its name from its owners MR P, Miss Ken D and some Djs from Dublins Power FM. The original transmitter was the original Power 98.7FM equipment. Another big station in the late 90s early 00's was Kiss 105.5FM (run by Tom Donegan) which had a more commercial side than Radio Friendly and was aimed at a younger audience, such DJs such as Colin Edwards, Damien Sreenan, Dave Newman and Derek O Keefe were regulars on this, it closed down in 2001. The main pirate station in Cork nowadays is another Kiss (run by WKD aka Bossman), but they have been the subject of much Comreg attention and have been raided several times having broadcasting equipment confiscated. The most recent relaunch of Kiss 94.8 lasted only 3 weeks with the station being raided once again (13/08/2008 13:00) and all equipment was confiscated while off air. This is believed to be due to the poularity of the station which poses a financial threat to other licencsed broadcasters in the area. Early in 2009 Kiss returned to a new frequency of 106.5, in which they were broadcasting since 2006. This was over-rode by a City Pirate called Pulse FM which had taken the frequency back, which they were broadcasting since 2005. Kiss was stuck in a deep grave at this time, and found a near frequency at the lower end of the band, 87.8, the former frequency of Galaxy FM with the same owner ( Franko aka the Man who cant be moved) of Pulse FM who had returned onto the airwaves. Kiss moved to 88.7 in late 2009 due to a temporaray licenced station about to appear on 87.7, 'too near' their previous frequency. Kiss fm ceased to operate on 2/4/10 due to financial reasons. & Now KissFm is back on 88.7 MHz 19/8/10

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Galway

Galway's first pirate radio station was Saor Raidió Chonamara (Free Radio Connemara) which first came on the air during Oireachtas na Gaeilge 1968 as a direct response to the Irish government's inaction over Irish language broadcasting. The station used a medium wave transmitter surreptitiously imported from the Netherlands. The Irish government responded by proposing a national Irish-language radio station RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta which came on the air on Easter Sunday 1972. Its headquarters are now in Casla, Co. Galway.

In the summer of 1978, a pop-format pirate radio station, IRG Independent Radio Galway, staffed mostly by local university students, began broadcasting from a studio off Shop Street, Galway City. IRG remained intermittently on the air, despite halfhearted raids by Gardaí (Irish police), until the early 1980s.

In 1981, WCCR (West Coast Community Radio) began broadcasting headed by Gerry Delaney as station manager. Kevin and Mike Kearns were new voices on the air along with Bob Houston and Keith Finnegan. Shane Martin would join them later that year, only to depart after a few months due to a dispute with the owners.

In 1983, Radio Renmore took to the airwaves founded by Gary Hardiman. Snowflake Radio followed the Christmas of that year and in the summer of 1984 Renmore Local Radio (RLR) was born fronted by Gary Hardiman and presenter Brian Walsh. With its Galway-accented jingles advertising the station's presence on 199 metres MW, the station was a great local success.

The station was nevertheless supplanted in 1984, by the professionally-backed Atlantic Sound broadcasting from Forster Street under the care of Alan Russell, which later became Atlantic 1026 "Home of the Hits" with talent like Don Stevens, Keith York, Brian Walsh, Richie O'Shea & Steve Marshall. A difference of opinion between station owner and on-air DJs led to the departure of nearly all staff, who then set up WLS Music Radio (which stood for 'West Local Station') across the street in 1985.

Shane Martin (from the now defunct WCCR), was brought in by station manager Mick Naughton to revive Atlantic Sound and change its format to suit the Galway audience. Shane called in favours from local bands and DJs and entertainment friends to assist with the new makeover. Thus began a great rivalry between Atlantic Sound and WLS. It was a healthy rivalry that lasted over a year, until one Sunday morning a truck appeared outside the Atlantic Sound studios and all the gear was being loaded into it. This happened so fast, the morning DJ had no idea that he was broadcasting to nobody, The transmitter was already in the truck. Atlantic Sound was no more and WLS was the only station left to cater to the Galway audience.

In 1986 Twiggs FM came onto the airwaves. The brainchild of Shane Martin and owners of Twiggs nightclub where he worked in Salthill, Galway. Twiggs was the first radio station to broadcast "Live" bands on-air in Galway City. During this time WLS staff would frequent the nightclub posting stickers everywhere promoting their radio station.

Shane Martin eventually left Twiggs FM and the nightclub because the original focus had changed, and set up KFM about 8 miles outside Galway City. He brought in Barry Williams to assist and in between on-air shows, they would take turns with a pickaxe, to dig a trench up the mountainside to bury cable to a new and higher transmission ariel which would give them better stereo FM sound and a farther reach. A couple of months after the KFM startup, WLS began jamming the KFM frequency playing German marching music.

WLS had its own problems very soon thereafter, and once again most of the staff abandoned ship and set up Coast 103 in a building on Prospect Hill. In the meanwhile, Shane Martin from KFM kept bumping into Keith York and Steve Marshall in various pubs and niteclubs. They kept saying... "why don't you come and work for a real radio station"! He eventually did, and the rest is Galway Pirate Radio History!

Coast 103 became the most successful Pirate Radio station on the Irish west coast ever, reaching all the way to Limerick and beyond. Advertisers flocked to the unique sound the station delivered and audience numbers grew by the thousands. Coast 103 was the Radio Nova of the west coast. The on-air personnel were Keith York, Barry Williams, Shane Martin, Steve Marshall, Richie O'Shea, Stuart Clark, Dave Shearer and Niall Stewart,

County Sound Radio began broadcasting from Tuam in North Galway on March 17, 1987 under the guidance of Benen Tierney. County Sound brought a different sound to the local radio scene. It appealed to a mixed adult audience and featured the Alfasound jinglepack of County Sound Radio in Surrey UK. County Sound Radio moved to Galway City early in 1988 and broadcast live 24 hours per day until December 31, 1988 when the then Minister for Communications Ray Burke introduced new legislation aimed at suppressing pirate stations [1].

These CHR/AC stations, mostly headed and staffed by professional broadcasters with experience in Israel, United States, Ireland and Britain, brought the concept of community-based pirate radio in Galway to an end (with the exception of NUIG College Campus Radio, FlirtFM), but heralded the new and legal local radio format which survives in the legally-broadcasting Galway Bay FM, which came on the air in 1989 (Broadcast as "Radio West" 1989–93).

Other stations in Galway during the 1980s included Emerald Radio fronted by Donal Mahon, Candy FM in Ballinasloe and GDR in Loughrea.

After the official Irish Government closedown of all Pirate Radio stations on Dec 31, 1988, there was very little pirate activity in the city with the exception of Quincentinial Radio, when the voice of Shane Martin was heard once again at 6:07pm, nine days into the violation with the assistance of Tony Allen voiced liners in reference to "Galway DJ's prefer not to be unemployed". Radio Friendly was also heard (both short lived) and the more enduring (but intermittent) Radio Pirate Woman. In late 2007 a new licenced radio station began broadcasting in Galway. I- Radio (I 102–104) has been hugely successful with young listeners.

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Waterford

Waterford was home to three long running stations – Suirside, ABC Radio and WLR-FM, the latter winning the franchise to run the legal station for the Waterford City and County area after the competition run in early 1989 (following the introduction of the Radio and Television Act, 1988). ABC Radio which began operation in the nearby coastal town Tramore in 1982 had a distinct UK flavour with many English DJs and a notably slicker high tempo style than the other two. ABC Radio moved to a new studio in Waterford City in 1984. WLR-FM was the first continuous broadcast operation in the City or County. Full-time broadcasting by WLR commenced in 1978 with the station initially being located at Killotteran, just outside the city. After a few months WLR suffered a raid by the authorities on the 28 November 1978, but quickly returned to the airwaves. WLR moved to studios in the city at Wellington street, and later moved to Georges street (next door to what became the original location of the licenced WLR FM. WLR would settle firmly into a middle of the road station complete with local news and chat. Suirside (which was a breakaway group from WLR) was unusual in that at one time it broadcast on Short Wave in addition to the usual FM and MW frequencies. In later years Suirside relaunched under the name 'Crystal City Sound'. A short time later the station relaunched again as NCR (Nolan Cahill Radio), NCR closed down on the 26 December 1988. The Co. Waterford town of Dungarvan also had a long running pirate community radio station 'DCR' during the 1980s. DCR ran from a music store called Ben O'Neill's which is still in existence.

In the late 1990s Waterford had one of the more significant pirate stations in the country at the time with the professionally run 'ABC Power 104', which targeted a youth audience. The station launched in December 1995, lasting until October 2001, and included some personnel from the original ABC radio of the 1980s. ABC Power 104 made the issue of a youth licence for the area an election issue in the Waterford constituency prior to the 1997 General Election, this included a petition signing campaign. Shortly afterwards the IRTC decided that the Southeast was to be chosen as a pilot for a youth regional licence, which subsequently was awarded to Beat 102–103. A number of former ABC Power 104 presenters went on to work for the new licenced youth station – including Niall Power, Andy McCloskey, Pete Windle and Ray Colclough.

2003-04 Energy 102 Fm Its existence coincided with a population boom in the 18–35 year age bracket . CTE transmission and modulation equipment, producing a slick, clean FM sound, clearly received all over the Greater Galway Area. Heavily playlisted, slick voiceovers and jingle work all combined to make Energy 102 Fm extremely successful . |Ger Coen was link two station , he now run radio in Sweden Spain

Pirate Radio Outside Dublin: Limerick

Limerick has had an amount of pirate radio stations over the years, however not many of these have had sufficient longevity to make a significant impact.

The biggest radio stations in the region from the late 70s to mid-80s were RLWE (Radio Limerick Weekly Echo), Raidio Luimni, Big L, and Hits 954.

Other reasonably-significant radio stations in the area over the years included CCR (City Centre Radio), Radio Vera, Radio Munster, SoundChannel and Mid-West Radio (a name since adopted somewhat confusingly by a legal radio station in Mayo, in the West of Ireland).

Following the biggest closedown of the pirates in Ireland in 1988, and the subsequent legalisation of local radio services in the country, many people viewed that the pirate era was consigned to the past, and Limerick became home to a single government-licensed service called Radio Limerick One which ironically later had its broadcasting licence revoked only to continue operating as a pirate station (RLO) for 10 years, being constantly raided and fined, finally ceasing transmission after 10 years early 2007 as owners and engineers ventured to other projects.

The inexplicable failure to offer more choice – Limerick had initially been earmarked for at least two stations – meant that inevitably a number of pirate stations reappeared, the biggest ones being Kiss FM (2000–2001), specialist dance station Touch 107, Radio Magic 107.6FM, Galtee Radio, Country Gold, Estuary, NCW 106, and Wave FM (2003), which later became Galaxy 105 (2004). There were also all-too-brief appearances of Q101, Power 98FM, Club FM, Fresh 103 and Enterprise Radio

XFM

XFM was seen as one of the grandads of operating pirates in Ireland, having run almost continuously since 1991, when it was called Alice's Restaurant; Although other stations such as Radio Star Country, shortwave pirate Jolly Roger Radio/Riverside Radio and EFR/Choice FM (Mayo) have been around longer. XFM plays mainly alternative and rock music.

Kiss 103FM

Kiss 103 FM launched in March 1993 with a powerful signal on 103.2 MHz. It was marked at the time as being the first 'commercial' pirate station to operate since the 'super pirates' of the 1980s. Kiss FM was unique amongst the pirates of the time in that it was heavily formatted and operated twenty four hours per day. With studios in Terenure in South West Dublin, the station linked via UHF links to transmitters at Kilakee in the Dublin mountains. The station was regarded at the time to have attracted the best of the talent from the burgeoning pirate scene – as well as several presenters who had worked on the pirate stations of the 1980s. The station was an instant success, attracting the wrath of commercial operators and the Government regulator. Over the course of its eight month existence, the station's signals were jammed repeatedly by FM104, one of the (then) only two licenced commercial operators for the Dublin area, and its various mountain transmitter sites were raided by the Department of Communications. Kiss 103 finally closed in November 1994. No station in the history of pirate radio in Ireland experienced as much Government action as did Kiss 103. The station's transmitter sites were raided four times in eight months, while it's studio site was raided on two occasions, resulting in losses of expensive broadcasting equipment.

Kiss 103 was said to have caused a change in the attitude of the Government and the commercial radio sector toward unlicenced radio; prior to its launch, a number of hobby pirates had operated with relative immunity – Radio Dublin, DLR 106, Sunset Radio, NSR, Coast FM, Kiss FM (which changed its name prior to the launch of Kiss 103), Radio Active and others. In the months after the closedown of Kiss 103, only three pirates remained on air in Dublin – Coast FM, Club FM (Dance) and DLR 106.

Freedom 92FM

This station broadcast for seven years, serving Dublin city and surrounding areas. Playing non-stop chart music, it was hugely successful, with a large youth audience and many high-profile DJs. It distinguished itself from other Dublin stations through its relaxed on-air approach, with presenters you could identify with, few advertisements and no news coverage to interrupt the music.

The station was removed from the air by the Black Tuesday raids in May 2003 (see Pirate radio today). Some Freedom DJs now work for licenced Dublin stations.

Ronan Devitt (CKRfm and fm104 - Currently RTÉ Pulse).

Louise Jordan (Currently FM104).

Ryan Phillips (Currently Spin1038).

Neil Kavanagh (Currently production engineer Newstalk).

Paul Dee (Currently Dublins 98).

Greg Browne (Kfm, Immedia UK, Spin1038, currently RTÉ Pulse and flying for Ryanair as a pilot).

Michael Hogan (Currently Dublins 98).

Darragh O'Dea (Currently Dublins 98).

Simon Davis (Currently broadcast engineer).

The Freedom website has been resurrected at http://www.freedom92fm.net

Pulse FM 103.2

Pulse FM began life as a garden shed based radio station, as with others in this list. However, Pulse was driven strongly by commercial forces from the beginning. On air from 1995 to 1999, its existence coincided with a population boom in the 18–25 year age bracket. Pulse derived much of its income from promoting underage and overage discos in suburban Dublin, and as promoters and operators, the station management made substantial sums from this as well as advertising DJ hire services. Filed accounts at the CRO (No. 288948) confirm the financial success of the station. Its backers invested heavily in CTE transmission and modulation equipment, producing a slick, clean FM sound, clearly received all over the Greater Dublin Area.

Pulse FM was characterised by professional, well spoken, south Dublin posh accented DJs contrasting with the majority of other Dublin pirates at the time. Heavily playlisted, slick voiceovers and jingle work all combined to make Pulse FM extremely successful.

Prior to its closure, Pulse FM's owners commissioned an 'independent' report which put Pulse on a par with currently licenced commercial stations such as FM104 and 98FM.

Pulse FM formed a consortium to apply for the new 'Youth Music' station licence, offered by the IRTC. However, this application was not successful.

Quite a few former deejays with Pulse FM are currently on licenced radio.

Phantom FM

Phantom FM began broadcasting to Dublin in 1996 from a garden shed in Sandyford. (previously it had broadcast under various names including Spectrum FM from Ballybrack) Arguably one of the most successful Pirate stations of the 1990s, Phantom played mainly indie music which had a huge underground following in Dublin. This market which was completely ignored by the mainstream radio stations at the time which accounts for the success Phantom enjoyed. The unlicenced Phantom FM came to an end in the May 2003 crackdown on Dublin pirate radio stations. One of two transmitter sites used at the time by Phantom was raided by Comreg, however the studio in the city centre was untouched. Phantom briefly returned to the air on the Sunday afternoon following the raids, with a broadcast of its 'Anorak' programme, before finally closing as a pirate.

Phantom were notable that they were the first of post-1989 pirate stations to broadcast legally in Ireland when the Broadcasting Commission of Ireland awarded temporary licences on 2 occasions to the station. Phantom subsequently won the competition for an Alternative Music licence in November 2004, but due to legal challenges from one of the losing consortia (Zed FM/scrollside FM), it only went on air at the end of October 2006 with its new licence. Claims by the consortium, backed by Bob Geldof, Hot Press owner Niall Stokes and businessman Dermot Hanrahan, that Phantom's application benefited from their years of illegal broadcasting and a claimed infringement with its temporary licences were rejected.

Phantom has had a mixture of very experienced pirate broadcasters and some new talent during its different phases from unlicensed broadcasting right up to its current permanent licensed state. The Chief Executive Ger Rowe goes back to Radio Dublin Channel 2, circa 1982. General Manager Simon Maher had built up experience in a few pirates, starting in 1990 with Radio Dublin, and was the key figure in setting up Coast FM from his garden shed in Ballybrack. Steve Conway (some-time Phantom presenter and writer), who goes back to '80s pirates, has the distinction of having been involved in the most famous off-shore pirate Radio Caroline during the late '80s and the '90s.

Other stations

From the mid-1990s on, the majority of pirate stations ran a dance music format with Galaxy 107, Energy 106, Sunset, NSR 105, Kiss 103, Club FM and later Pulse 103 battling for supremacy and enjoying short spells at the top of the pile in Dublin. Leading Dublin non-dance pirates included Coast FM, DLR/Hits 106, Sun FM and Freedom FM.

The following deejays or broadcasters are just some examples of those who had involvement with some of the stations listed above: Simon Maher (Phantom), Steve K (Spin 103), Barry Dunne (98FM), Tracey Lee (ex-Today FM), Chris Murray (LMFM), Enda Caldwell(Radio Luxembourg), Mr Spring (2FM), James Davids (Spin 1038), Damien McCaul (Q102), Al Gibbs (FM104), Tony Dixon (FM104), Nikki Hayes (2FM) and Declan Pearse (98FM).

Outside Dublin most activity was to be found in the border regions although Cork, Limerick, Waterford as well as smaller towns like Castlebar, Tralee, Wexford and Enniscorthy all had varying levels of pirate activity through this period

Offshore Radio

While offshore pirates were rarer in Ireland, they still existed, and many notable UK offshore stations had a connection with Ireland. Both Radio Atlanta and Radio Caroline were built on board ships which were docked in (and made initial test transmissions from) a private Irish port at Greenore in the Republic of Ireland. The Dutch stations Radio Parajids and REM island were also fitted out in Irish ports while Laser 558 had some Irish staff and financial backing. Another offshore station located at various locations off the coast of Scotland in international waters, later identified itself as Radio Scotland and Ireland when its radio ship moved to anchorage off the west coast and within range of Ireland (for a time they anchored off Northern Ireland). During the mid 1960s there were unconfirmed reports of test broadcasts from Irish offshore stations like "Radio Shannon" and "Radio Lambay" but such transmissions if they ever took place were probably the work of landbased radio enthusiasts. Some UK offshore stations, particularly Radio Scotland and Radio Caroline North had a following in Ireland.

Northern Ireland

During the early 1970s there were several political "clandestine" stations operated by various nationalist and loyalist organisations however most of these were short lived. Later there were several attempts to establish commercial pirates in NI but the authorities quickly moved against these too. (Penalties for pirate broadcasting under UK law were a lot harsher than in Ireland.) Some of these stations subsequently moved across the border and broadcast into Northern Ireland from the Republic.

At one point there were over 15 stations doing so. Surprisingly there were only a handful of (mostly short lived) "political" stations South of the border as it was felt that the authorities were less likely to be tolerant of such stations. The longest running illegal station in Northern Ireland was Belfast's Irish language station "Raidió Fáilte" (lit. "Radio Welcome") in 2005 the authorities decided to licence Radio Failte. Such an action which would have been unthinkable before the Northern Ireland Peace Process

KISS FM

Kiss 106 launched from Dundalk in November 1998 and has continued under various guises as such until the present day with some short breaks in service. Wild Country, 106.6 The Frog and Lite 101.5 FM are all part of the Eye Media Group and have also operated alongside Kiss 106 as sister stations since around 2003. Currently Kiss FM is back on the air on 101.6 103.9 & 104.2 FM as Feel Good Radio. [2] KISS was taken off air on Friday 25th June 2010 By both Comreg and Ofcom and has not returned.

Storm 106 was a breakaway from Kiss 106 Dundalk by one of the original shareholders of Kiss 106 launching in 2002 and still on air to this present day as [3] an online dance station with a similar format to the old Nitetime programming from 7pm to 7am Kiss 106 of 1999.

See also

References

External links








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