The Full Wiki

Irony mark: Wikis

  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...

  • the irony mark is an atypical punctuation mark that, along with others, has been featured in some French artistic and literary publications to denote typographically different meanings in sentences?

More interesting facts on Irony mark

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

؟

Punctuation

apostrophe ( ' )
brackets ( [ ], ( ), { }, ⟨ ⟩ )
colon ( : )
comma ( , )
dashes ( , , , )
ellipses ( , ... )
exclamation mark ( ! )
full stop/period ( . )
guillemets ( « » )
hyphen ( -, )
question mark ( ? )
quotation marks ( ‘ ’, “ ” )
semicolon ( ; )
slash/stroke ( / )
solidus ( )
Word dividers
spaces ( ) () () ( ) () () ()
interpunct ( · )
General typography
ampersand ( & )
at sign ( @ )
asterisk ( * )
backslash ( \ )
bullet ( )
caret ( ^ )
copyright symbol ( © )
currency generic: ( ¤ )
specific: ฿, ¢, $, , ƒ, , , , £, , ¥, , , , , , ,
daggers ( , )
degree ( ° )
ditto mark ( )
inverted exclamation mark ( ¡ )
inverted question mark ( ¿ )
number sign/pound/hash ( # )
numero sign ( )
ordinal indicator (º, ª)
percent (etc.) ( %, ‰, )
pilcrow ( )
prime ( )
registered trademark ( ® )
section sign ( § )
service mark ( )
sound recording copyright symbol ( )
tilde ( ~ )
trademark ( )
underscore/understrike ( _ )
vertical/broken bar, pipe ( |, ¦ )
Uncommon typography
asterism ( )
falsum ( )
index/fist ( )
therefore sign ( )
because sign ( )
interrobang ( )
irony mark/percontation point ( ؟ )
lozenge ( )
reference mark ( )
tie ( )

The irony mark or irony point (؟) (French: point d’ironie; also called a snark or hook) is a proposed punctuation mark that was suggested to be used to indicate that a sentence should be understood at a second level (e.g. irony, sarcasm, etc.). It is illustrated by a small, elevated, backward-facing question mark. The irony mark has never been used widely. It appears occasionally in obscure artistic or literary publications.

Contents

History

The irony point as written by Alcanter de Brahm

This mark ؟ was proposed by the French poet Alcanter de Brahm (alias Marcel Bernhardt) at the end of the 19th century. It was in turn taken by Hervé Bazin in his book Plumons l’Oiseau ("Pluck the bird", 1966), in which the author proposes several other innovative punctuation marks, such as the doubt point (Point de doute.svg), certitude point (Point de certitude.svg), acclamation point (Point d'acclamation.svg), authority point (Point d'autorité.svg), indignation point (Point d'indignation.svg), and love point (Point d'amour.svg).

Its form is essentially the same as the late medieval Irony mark full.svg, a percontation point (punctus percontativus), which was used to mark rhetorical questions.[1]

Printing

This character can be represented using the reversed question mark found in Unicode as (⸮) U+2E2E. It can also be represented by the similar Arabic question mark U+061F (؟). This representation can cause problems in text processing using certain programs as it can cause the text to be interpreted in a right-to-left fashion consistent with the Arabic language.[citation needed]

Typefaces by the !Exclamachine Foundry include a "snark" period-tilde ligature glyph at U+E2D2 (sometimes represented as ".~"). This glyph and digraph have the advantages of having no other meaning, and not getting confused with sentence-leading inverted punctuation in Spanish bilingual texts.[2][3]

Percontation point

The "rhetorical question mark" or percontation point was invented by Henry Denham in the 1580s and was used at the end of a rhetorical question; however, its use died out in the 1600s. It was the reverse of an ordinary question mark, so that instead of the main opening pointing back into the sentence, it opened away from it.[4] This character can be represented using the reversed question mark (؟) found in Unicode as U+2E2E. The percontation point is analogous to the "Irony Mark"—used to indicate that a sentence should be understood at a second level (e.g. irony, sarcasm, etc.)—but these are rarely seen.[1]

Rhetorical questions in some (informal) situations can use a bracketed question mark, eg. "Oh, really(?)", for example in 888 subtitles.[5]

The question mark can also be used as a "meta" sign to signal uncertainty regarding what precedes. It is usually put between brackets (?). The uncertainty may concern either a superficial (such as unsure spelling) or a deeper truth, (real meaning) level.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Proposal to add Medievalist and Iranianist punctuation characters to the UCS by Michael Everson, Peter Baker, Marcus Dohnicht, António Emiliano, Odd Einar Haugen, Susana Pedro, David J. Perry, Roozbeh Pournader.
  2. ^ "FAQ". Thesnark.org. 2007-06-14. http://thesnark.org/faq/. Retrieved 2010-02-21. 
  3. ^ "Typofile: Irony Mark???". Typophile.com. http://www.typophile.com/node/28817. Retrieved 2010-02-21. 
  4. ^ Truss, Lynne. Eats, Shoots & Leaves, 2003. p. 142. ISBN 1-592-40087-6.
  5. ^ The equivalent for an ironic or sarcastic statement would be a bracketed exclamation mark, eg. "Oh, really(!)".







Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message