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For the car, see Morris Ital.

Rastafari movement
Flag of Ethiopia (1897).svg

Main doctrines
Jah · Afrocentrism · Ital · Zion
Central figures

Jesus Christ · Queen of Sheba · King Solomon · Haile Selassie · Marcus Garvey · Leonard Howell · God

Key scriptures
Bible · Kebra Nagast · The Promise Key · Holy Piby · My Life and Ethiopia's Progress · Royal Parchment Scroll of Black Supremacy
Branches and festivals
Mansions · United States · Shashamane · Grounation Day
Notable individuals
Bob Marley · Peter Tosh · Walter Rodney · Mutabaruka · Benjamin Zephaniah
See also:
Vocabulary · Persecution · Dreadlocks · Reggae · Ethiopian Christianity · Index of Rastafari articles

Ital or I-tal is food often celebrated by those in the Rastafari movement. The word derives from the English word "vital", with the initial syllable replaced by i.[1] This is done to many words in the Rastafari vocabulary to signify the unity of the speaker with all of nature. Rastafarians derive their beliefs and morality from intense personal meditations and prayer, and therefore there is no single dogma of Rastafarian belief. Due to this emphasis on individual personal meditation in Rastafari, the expression of Ital eating varies widely from Rasta to Rasta, and there are few universal "rules" of Ital living.

The primary goal of adhering to an Ital diet is to increase Livity, or the life energy that Rastas generally believe lives within all of us, as conferred from the Almighty. A common tenet of Rastafarian beliefs is the sharing of a central Livity among living things, and what is put into one's body should enhance Livity rather than reduce it. Though there are different interpretations of ital regarding specific foods, the general principle is that food should be natural, or pure, and from the earth; Rastas therefore often avoid food which is chemically modified or contains artificial additives (e.g., color, flavorings, and preservatives). Some also avoid added salt in foods, especially salt with the artificial addition of iodine, while pure sea or kosher salt is eaten by some. In strict interpretations, foods that have been produced using chemicals such as pesticides and fertilizer are not considered ital.

Early adherents adopted their dietary laws based on their interpretation of several books of the Bible, like the Genesis ("Then God said, "I give you every Seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food."[2]), the Leviticus and Deuteronomy. In common with religions such as Judaism, Islam, and Ethiopian Christianity, most Rastas avoid the eating of pork. Some Rastas also avoid eating shellfish because, in common with pigs, they are considered to be scavengers. Most Rastas avoid the consumption of red meat, some do not eat fish over 12 inches in length, and some are strict vegetarians or vegans.[3]

The most strict interpretations also avoid food that has been preserved by canning or drying and even prohibit the use of metal cooking utensils. In this case, only clay and wood cooking pots, crockery, and cutlery are used. Few adherents of ital follow the strictest interpretation; some Rastas do not adhere to them at all.

Due to its roots in Jamaica and the deleterious effects alcohol has had on Jamaican society, many Rastafarians do not approve of alcohol consumption. However, many Rastas, especially those in the United States and Europe, do drink alcohol on occasion as long as it does not reach a level that clouds the mind or reduces their livity. Many Rastas disapprove of cigarettes due to the serious health concerns associated with their use, and a few Rastas avoid coffee and other caffeinated beverages, though this is less common. Most Rastas, however, do favor the use of cannabis because they believe it causes a strong prayerful state. Some Rastas do not believe in modern medicine, but many urbanized Rastas allow such practice.

See also

References

  1. ^ Ital Cooking - EatJamaican.com
  2. ^ Genesis 1:29
  3. ^ Wood, A., Logan, J. and Rose, J., Movement and Change: Movement and Change, Nelson Thornes, 1997. ISBN 0174370679, 9780174370673

External links

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

Czech

Noun

Ital m.

  1. Italian (person)

Declension

Related terms


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