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Italian battleship Caio Duilio: Wikis

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  • the Italian battleship Caio Duilio was one of the longest-lived World War I dreadnoughts?

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Italian battleship Caio Duilio in 1948.
Career Regia Marina Ensign Marina Militare Ensign
Name: Caio Duilio
Builder: Castellammare di Stabia
Laid down: 24 February 1912
Launched: 24 April 1913
Commissioned: 13 June 1916
Fate: Scrapped, 1957
General characteristics
Class and type: Andrea Doria-class battleship

Caio Duilio was an Italian Andrea Doria-class battleship that served in the Regia Marina during World War I and World War II. She was named after the Roman fleet commander Gaius Duilius.

Built as a 29,861 tonne battleship with thirteen 305/46 mm guns, she and her sister ship Andrea Doria went through several changes in their careers, including receiving seaplanes.

Extensive modernisation took place between 1937 and 1940. Among other changes, the number of 305/46 mm guns was reduced to ten, and they were rebored to 320/44 mm, to equal the caliber of the French Dunkerque-class battleships.

Caio Duilio was damaged by a torpedo during the Battle of Taranto. She was towed to Genoa for repairs lasting six months, and narrowly escaped further damage when the port was bombarded by British warships in February 1941. In December 1941, Duilio participated in the First Battle of Sirte. She was placed on the reserve in 1942 because of fuel shortages. After the Armistice with the Allies in 1943, Caio Duilio was used as a training ship. Finally the 41-year-old dreadnought, now old and worn out, was scrapped at La Spezia in 1957.

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