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Italian general election, 1921: Wikis

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The Italian general election of 1921 took place on 15 May 1921.

The Liberal governing coalition, strengthened by the joining of Fascist candidates in the "National Blocs", came short of the absolute majority. The Italian Socialist Party, weakened by the split of the Communist Party of Italy, lost many votes and seats, while the Italian People's Party was steady around 20%. The Socialists were stronger in Lombardy (41.9%), than in their historical strongholds of Piedmont (28.6%), Emilia-Romagna (33.4%) and Tuscany (31.0%), due to the presence of the Communists (11.9, 5.2 and 10.5%), while the Populars were confirmed the largest party of Veneto (36.5%) and the Liberal parties in most Southern regions.[1]

Results

e • d 
Parties Chamber of Deputies
Votes +/- % +/- Seats +/-
Liberal parties 41.0
24.5
10.5
4.7
1.3
+3.1 252
148
68
29
7
+45
Italian Socialist Party (socialist) 24.5 -7.5 123 -33
Italian People's Party (Christian-democratic) 20.7 +0.0 108 +8
Communist Party of Italy (communist) 4.6 new 15 new
Italian Republican Party (social-liberal) 3.8 +2.3 6 -3
Slavic and German parties (regionalist) 1.3 new 9 new
Party of Combatants (conservative) 1.2 -2.9 10 -20
Economic–Agrarian Party (agrarian-conservative) 0.7 -0.8 5 -2
Italian Reform Socialist Party (social-democratic) 0.6 -0.9 4 -2
Independent Socialist Party (socialist) 0.6 +0.0 1 =
Sardinian Action Party (regionalist) 0.5 new 2 new
Fasci di Combattimento (fascist) 0.5 new 35 +35
Total (turnout 56.7%)   100.0   535  
Source: Piergiorgio Corbetta; Maria Serena Piretti, Atlante storico-elettorale d'Italia, Zanichelli, Bologna 2009

References

  1. ^ Piergiorgio Corbetta; Maria Serena Piretti, Atlante storico-elettorale d'Italia, Zanichelli, Bologna 2009
  2. ^ The list was composed mainly of Liberals, Radicals, Democrats, Reform Socialists and other members of the governing coalition, but comprised also some Fascists (35, including Benito Mussolini, were elected).
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