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1992 Italy 1996
Italian general election, 1994
All 630 seats in the Italian Chamber of Deputies
and 315 (of the 326) seats in the Italian Senate
27 March 1994
First party Second party Third party
Silvio Berlusconi.jpg Replace this image male.svg Replace this image male.svg
Leader Silvio Berlusconi Achille Occhetto Mario Segni
Party Pole of Freedoms Alliance of Progressives Pact for Italy
Leader's seat Rome Centre Bologna West XV - Rome
Last election New alliance New alliance New alliance
Seats won 366 (H)
155 (S)
213 (H)
122 (S)
46 (H)
31 (S)
Popular vote 17,746,612 12,632,680 6,019,038
Percentage 46.1% 32.8% 15.6%

Incumbent Prime Minister
Carlo Azeglio Ciampi
[[Independent|{{Template: Independent/meta/shortname}}]]

An early national general election was held in Italy on March 27, 1994 to elect members of the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate. Silvio Berlusconi's centre-right won handly the election for the Chamber and only narrowly lost that for the Senate.

The Berlusconi I Cabinet obtained a vote of confidence also in the Senate thanks to the defection of four Senators of the Italian People's Party (Vittorio Cecchi Gori, Stefano Cusumano, Luigi Grillo and Tomaso Zanoletti), who decided not to participate to the vote.

The vote of the Senators for life was not decisive as three (Gianni Agnelli, Francesco Cossiga and Giovanni Leone) voted in favour of the government, three were absent (Carlo Bo, Norberto Bobbio and Amintore Fanfani) and five voted against (Giulio Andreotti, Francesco De Martino, Giovanni Spadolini and Paolo Emilio Taviani and Leo Valiani).

The Senate finally gave to Berlusconi 159 votes in favour and 153 against.[1]

Contents

Electoral System

A new electoral system was introduced in these elections, after the abolition of the proportional representation, which was established after the end of World War Two, by a referendum in 1993.

The new intricate electoral system of Italy, nicknamed as Mattarellum (after Sergio Mattarella, who was the official proponent), provided a 75% of the seats on the Chamber of Deputies (the Lower House) as elected by first-past-the-post system, whereas the remaining 25% was assigned on a proportional way with a minimum threshold of 4%. If possible, the method associate on the Senate was even more complicated: 75% of seats by uninominal method, and 25% by a special proportional method that actually assigned the remaining seats to minority parties.

Results

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Chamber of Deputies

Coalition Results
Uninominal Proportional Total
Votes % Seats Coalition Party Seats Seats
Party Votes % Seats
  Pole of Freedoms,
Pole of Good Government
and others of centre-right[2]
18,200,270 46.3% 302 Forza Italia-CCD 8,138,781 21.0% 30 64 366
National Alliance 5,214,133 13.5% 23
Lega Nord 3,235,248 8.4% 11
Pannella List 1,359,283 3.5% -
  Alliance of Progressives
and others of left-wing[3]
12,722,157 33.0% 164 Democratic Party of the Left 7,881,646 20.4% 38 49 213
Communist Refoundation Party 2,343,946 6.1% 11
Federation of the Greens 1,047,268 2.7% -
Italian Socialist Party 849,429 2.2% -
The Net 719,841 1.9% -
Democratic Alliance 456,114 1.2% -
  Pact for Italy 6,019,038 15.6 4 Italian People's Party 4,287,172 11.1% 29 42 46
Patto Segni 1,811,814 4.7% 13
  Italian Democratic Socialist Party[4] 219,819 0.6% - Italian Democratic Socialist Party 179,495 0.5% - - -
  South Tyrolean People's Party 187,997 0.5% 3 South Tyrolean People's Party 231,842 0.6% - - 3
  Sardinian Action Party 82,258 0.2% - - - - - - -
  Trentino Tyrolean Autonomist Party 58,962 0.2% - - - - - - -
  Southern Action League 53,131 0.1% 1 Southern Action League 59,873 0.2% - - 1
  Vallée d'Aoste 43,700 0.1% 1 - - - - - 1
  Other 916,826 2.4% - Others 903,804 2.3% - - -

Senate of the Republic

Coalition Results
Uninominal Proportional Total
Votes % Seats Seats Seats
  Pole of Freedoms[5] 6,570,468 19.9% 74 8 82
  Pole of Good Government[6] 4,544,573 13.7% 54 10 64
  National Alliance[7] 2,077,934 6.3% - 8 8
  Pannella List[8] 767,765 2.3% - 1 1
  Forza Italia-CCD[9] 149,965 0.5% - 1 1
  Total centre-right 14,110,705 42.7% 128 28 156
  Alliance of Progressives 10,881,320 32.9% 96 26 122
  Italian Socialist Party[10] 103,490 0.3% - - -
  Magris List[11] 61,400 0.2% 1 - 1
  The Net[12] 12,560 0.0% - - -
  Total left-wing 11,058,770 33.4% 97 26 123
  Pact for Italy 5,519,090 16.7% 3 28 31
  Pensioners' Party 250,637 0.8% - - -
  Lombard Alpine League 246,046 0.8% 1 - 1
  South Tyrolean People's Party 217,137 0.7% 3 - 3
  Vallée d'Aoste 27,493 0.1% 1 - 1
  Others 1,644,671 5.0% - - -

References

  1. ^ Il Sole 24 Ore - Nel 1994 decisivi per Berlusconi tre senatori a vita.
  2. ^ The Pole of Freedoms was present in Northern Italy and Tuscany (8,735,506 votes), the Pole of Good Government in Marche, Umbria, Lazio, Southern Italy and Insular Italy (6,412,044), National Alliance presented autonomous lists in Northern Italy, Tuscany, Marche, Abruzzo and part of Campania (2,566,848), the Christian Democratic Centre presented autonomous lists in Molise (10,772) Pannella List presented autonomous lists in Piedmont, Lombardy, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Liguria, Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany, Lazio, Campania, Apulia, part of Sicily and Sardinia (475,100).
  3. ^ The Alliance of Progressives was present throughout Italy (12,632,680 votes), but the Italian Socialist Party presented autonomous lists in Sicily (71,857) and The Net presented autonomous lists in Sardinia (17,620).
  4. ^ Some candidates of the Italian Democratic Socialist Party ran under the banner of Pact for Italy.
  5. ^ The Pole of Freedoms was present in Northern Italy and Tuscany.
  6. ^ The Pole of Good Government was present in Marche, Umbria, Lazio, Southern Italy and Insular Italy.
  7. ^ National Alliance fielded candidates in Northern Italy, Tuscany, Marche, Umbria and Abruzzo, while in the rest of the country it was part of the Pole of Good Government.
  8. ^ Pannella List was present in Piedmont, Lombardy, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany, Lazio and Apulia.
  9. ^ Forza Italia-CCD fielded candidates in Abruzzo, while in the rest of the country it was part of the Pole of Freedoms or of the Pole of Good Government.
  10. ^ The Italian Socialist Party fielded candidates in Sicily, while in the rest of the country it was part of the Alliance of Progressives.
  11. ^ The Magris List was present only in the district of Trieste.
  12. ^ The Net fielded candidates in Sardinia, while in the rest of the country it was part of the Alliance of Progressives.

External links

Preceded by
1992 general election
Italian general elections Succeeded by
1996 general election

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