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Great Mosque of Esfahan, View of the north iwan from the courtyard

An iwan (Persian: إيوان eyvān) is defined as a vaulted hall or space, walled on three sides, with one end entirely open.

Iwans were a trademark of the Sassanid architecture of Persia, later finding their way into Islamic architecture. This transition reached its peak during the Seljuki era, when iwans became established as a fundamental design unit in Islamic architecture.

Typically, iwans open on to a central courtyard, and have been used in both public and residential architecture.

Contents

The Great Iwan of Cairo

The Great Iwan (or al-Iwan al-Kabir, Dar al-'Adl, Iwan of al-Nasir) of Cairo was a public and ceremonial space located in the southern section of the Saladin Citadel where the Mamluk sultan sat enthroned to administer justice, receive ambassadors, and carry out other duties of state. The structure used to be known as Dar al-'Adl during the reign of Saladin, the Mamluk ruler of the Bahri dynasty Al-Nasir Muhammad rebuilt the monumental structure twice, in 1315 and 1334. The Great Iwan was demolished by Muhammad Ali Pasha in the early 19th century.

The 19th century Description de l'Egypte depicted a square hypostyle structure with five parallel aisles and a dome. The building was open to the exterior on three sides through arcades, and the main façade was articulated with a large central arch flanked by two smaller arches on either side. [1][2]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Rabbat, Nasser O. 1989. Citadel of Cairo (Geneva: AKTC), p. 11-13.
  2. ^ Gillispie, Charles Coulston & Michel Dewachter. 1987. Monuments of Egypt : the Napoleonic edition : the complete archaeological plates from La description de l'Egypte. (Princeton, NJ : Princeton AP & Architectural League of NY, The J. Paul Getty Trust).

See also

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Welsh

Proper noun

Iwan

  1. A male given name, an equivalent of John.

See also


Simple English

, View of the north iwan from the courtyard]]

An iwan ((Persian: إيوان) eyvān) is defined as a vaulted hall or space, walled on three sides, with one end open. Iwans were a trademark of the Sassanid architecture of Persia. They then found their way into Islamic architecture.

Typically, iwans open on to a central courtyard, and have been used in both public and residential architecture.


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